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    1. Kit: , by (VIP/Sponsor) xken is online now
      Builder Last Online: Nov 2014 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/8 Rating:  (24 votes - 4.71 average) Thanks: 0
      Started: 02-15-09 Build Revisions: Never  
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      This build will be intended to aquaint those interested in working with brass. I will also keep it simple so as no sophisticated equipment is required. Everything will be hand built with hand tools. So of course if you have equipment you can build quicker. This will be a 1/8th scale Model T racer when completed. I have a picture posted in another thread. And I will find tune as I post.

      Here is getting started by cutting out the profile of the side rails. You need real good light to cut down the scribe line. Once cut out the side rail may have some curl from cutting, very carefully with just your fingers form it back to flat slowly and carefully. The rails were layed out on 1" x 12" x.016" brass sheet. The angles were 3/16" x 36" x.016". When all soldered together the side walls will be 1/32" thick with the return flanges being .016. Working with brass is like playing chess; you have to plan ahead right down to buying your materials. Build the part in you head first step by step, then buy what you need, materials, tools etc.



      Here is soldering the side rails to top angles. The secret to soldering is letting your iron get real hot , touch it to the solder end to gather a puddle on the iron and then to the joint. Remember solder will always flow to heat and since it is liquid is subject to the laws of gravity.
      I apply the liquid flux with a paint brush to the entire joint before soldering. The tempurature is correct when the solder flows freely into the joint. The spring clamps also provide handles to hold the piece while soldering.



      Here is a closeup of the above picture.



      Here is a shot of adding the rail extension since stock sheet was too short. Needed another 11/16". Once finished up the joint is barely visible and I put this to the rear of the chassis where it will be less obvious anyway.



      Here is how to file the bottom angle to fit the side rail. Double sided carpet tape works great to hold small pieces. I would recommend buying a steel block if you do not have one. I think MicroMark offers one. Also handy to hammer some parts back to flat. Be careful to slowly remove the part from the tape so as not to bend or distort the piece. The tape adhesive works well in holding it in place.



      Here is the bottom angle cut and filed to fit. Working with brass requires patience and a good assortment of files.



      Here is how to remove excess solder. Scrape , file, sand and polish. Note: Blades are stamped out as a result one edge is rounded down while the other has a sharp edge. Use the sharp edge to scrape . You can easilly tell the difference when you try to scrape .



      Here is the finished left rail.



      Now to finish up the right side. Then the next installment will be the crossmenbers.
      Please feel free to post questions, and there is no such thing as a stupid question.

      Ken

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  1. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Kenneth
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    Here I have cut out patterns in paper and have spray glued them down to two sheets of brass for both front and rear crossmembers of chassis.







    I am not left handed; I just wanted to hold saw while I took picture with my right hand.



























    If you are going to solder; you will need a roll of binding wire. This is what I use and it does a great job holding assemblies together until soldered.







    Finished Basic Frame



    Last edited by xken; 09-02-11 at 08:29 AM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #2

  2. hot ford coupe's Avatar Super Moderator
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    Jeffrey
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    Wow, Now we're talking. Ken, this is one of the best tutorials I have seen on the site. It demystifies the whole procedure and makes the steps clear as a bell. Thanks so much for taking this on. Speaking for myself, this is going to be indispensible when I go to do the brass chassis for the Coffin. This is what I live and breathe for.
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #3

  3. ScaleMotorcars's Avatar Administrator
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    Daniel
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    Quote Originally Posted by hot ford coupe View Post
    It demystifies the whole procedure and makes the steps clear as a bell.
    Couldnt have said it better.
    " He who works with his hands is a laborer. He who works with his hands, and his head is a craftsman. He who works with his hands, and his head, and his heart, is An Artist. "- St. Francis of Assisi
    QUOTE QUOTE #4

  4. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Kenneth
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    I will keep going the best I can; then migrate into the more advanced stuff that will require Lathes and or Milling machine like the engine and rear axles and things.

    I am having a hard time finding info on the engine support crossmenbers and drawing of the stock engine. All else fails I will bypass until Hawk introduces their engine and then buy one for reference. If some some has this kind of info it would be a great help. Anyone one out there with a Model T engine manual????;';;';

    In the meantime I will also keep pluging away at the Stearman to. I have to admit building this racer is fun and enjoyable and much less difficult than planes.

    Ken
    QUOTE QUOTE #5

  5. ScaleMotorcars's Avatar Administrator
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    Daniel
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    Ken try this link for some tech info.

    Tech Corner

    Detailed wheel building.

    Adobe Web Photo Gallery

    You may want to also try this site. Its a French Model T site but they have allot of info. You may need to register.

    www.Ford-T.fr
    " He who works with his hands is a laborer. He who works with his hands, and his head is a craftsman. He who works with his hands, and his head, and his heart, is An Artist. "- St. Francis of Assisi
    QUOTE QUOTE #6

  6. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Kenneth
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    Thanks this will be great when I get back to building the wheels.

    Ken
    QUOTE QUOTE #7

  7. Don Garrett's Avatar Asst. Administrator
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    Ken...lots of pages, info and drawings scroll down through some of the early speed goodies.

    Dyke's Automobile and Gasoline ... - Google Book Search
    Last edited by Don Garrett; 02-17-09 at 02:49 PM.
    Grandpa McGurk.....Steppin' Large and Livin' easy.
    TDRinnovations.com
    QUOTE QUOTE #8

  8. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Kenneth
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    I have run across this site, unfortunately one cannot down load individual images or pages. I also happen to own a 1918 Original Dykes Manual that has a lot of these pictures in them; but not the ones of the engine views as shown in this version.

    I am still looking, thanks for the help.

    Ken
    QUOTE QUOTE #9

  9. ScaleMotorcars's Avatar Administrator
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    Daniel
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    Ken. At the top of the page you'll see a little box icon with an arrow. Click that and then click and drag the pointer over any page you want. Its going to give you a pop-up with (share this clip) ignore that and right click the mouse. Select copy then past the image into any photo editing software. After that you can save it to your computer.

    Hope that helps.
    " He who works with his hands is a laborer. He who works with his hands, and his head is a craftsman. He who works with his hands, and his head, and his heart, is An Artist. "- St. Francis of Assisi
    QUOTE QUOTE #10

  10. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Kenneth
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    I got it after a few clicks here and there I sent it to the printer and it printed out. A little pixilated but now I have some thing to work with.

    Thanks again. Ken

    PS. Nice Pictures Below these will come in handy!
    Last edited by xken; 02-17-09 at 05:55 PM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #11

  11. Don Garrett's Avatar Asst. Administrator
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    Here a couple shots without all the goodies hangin' off it. Note the three pedals on the transmission.
    A whopping 20 horsepower!
    Attached Images Attached Images    
    Grandpa McGurk.....Steppin' Large and Livin' easy.
    TDRinnovations.com
    QUOTE QUOTE #12

  12. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Kenneth
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    Where did you get these pictures? This looks like the earlier engine that I am after.

    Also I have been comparing the photos of the car I took a Glenmoor with the museum setting photo that Dan posted and they are two different cars. Dan's car photo shows no clinchers on the wheel while the Glenmoor car has clinchers. My understanding is that the clinchers were a later development to make it easier to change tires.

    A friend of mind has joined the site yesterday and he is going to try and put me in touch with the Glenmoor car owner for more information about the car.

    But it appears that the engine in both cars is set back in the chassis about 12" from the normal T location requiring a second front crossmember to support the front of the engine. This member can be seen traversing the radiator in the front view of the car.

    Will be building it next, the same way per installment #2.

    QUOTE QUOTE #13

  13. Don Garrett's Avatar Asst. Administrator
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    Hey Ken, apples and oranges. The frame you are building is circa '26-'27. The engine pics I posted are a restoration from a 1910 vehicle or so days, back when there was no tin cowl. The fire wall was a flat piece wood not metal.
    Before the guys start with the was I at the last supper jokes, let me answer No. But there are times when I seem to recall being around when the dead sea was just beginning to get get sick.

    My head is full of useless information but I'm not sure what your game plan is for your build.
    If you have a specific car in mind or your interruption of one fill me in and I'll make a trip into the dusty cobweb covered archives if it's any help to you.
    Grandpa McGurk.....Steppin' Large and Livin' easy.
    TDRinnovations.com
    QUOTE QUOTE #14

  14. hot ford coupe's Avatar Super Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by Don Garrett View Post
    Before the guys start with the was I at the last supper jokes, let me answer No. But there are times when I seem to recall being around when the dead sea was just beginning to get get sick.

    .
    . Now that's a funny joke right there. I don't care who you are, that's funny right there.
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #15

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