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Continental Mark II
Goal amount for this year: 518 USD, Received: 200.00 USD (39%)
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Continental Mark II Continental Mark II Continental Mark II Continental Mark II Continental Mark II
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    1. Kit: Roger Zimmermann, by (Yearly Subscriber) Roger Zimmermann is online now
      Builder Last Online: Aug 2019 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/12 Rating:  (17 votes - 5.00 average) Thanks: 25
      Started: 05-17-12 Build Revisions: Never  
      Not Supported Scratch Built

      As stated in my presentation, I'm doing since 2 years a Continental Mark II, scale 1:12. Presently, I'm doing the floor; the trunk floor is ready. The next step is going towards the front by doing the floor under the rear seat. To spare metal and unnecessary reworks, I did first a model with cardboard. Now, it will be easier to cut the brass at the proper place.


      Continental Mark II
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  1. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    The front stabilizer was not yet done; this shortcut is now corrected. At first glance it was an easy addition; there are some issues to take in consideration: as the stabilizer supports are about at the same "altitude" than the lower levers, an indentation is done to clear the lever when the suspension is bottoming. The front tires must not contact the stabilizer in a very tight curve like parking.





    Since a week, (we are now February 12, 2012) I'm with the shock absorbers. What? a week for such simple parts? Well, they may be easy to do: a cylinder, a rod and that is! Not with me: they have to be more or less functional.

    When I did the Toronado, I had the intention to have valving and so on. Obviously, this was not practical; my tooling equipment was not adapted for parts that small. It could be done as an exercise; I had to look also the ratio between labor and usage. I opted for a compromise with a piston and some liquid. The main problem was the seal at the rod, it was never tight. I found a compromise with a BP product I got for another application: Hyvis.

    As my shock absorbers are done on an empirical method, it's each time an adventure for itself; mostly I do not notice the changes I did on my drawings.

    The rear shocks for the Avanti were good, unfortunately, after a while, the thinnest Hyvis got out. When I did the front ones, I probably took in account the problem I had with the rear ones and I used the thick Hyvis. Result: the shock absorbers are too hard!

    I "repaired" the rear ones with a mix of thin and thick Hyvis with good results as they are still effective. As you can see on the picture, this is a real strange product, which is difficult to fill into a small tube!



    The first shock for the Mark II is done; the other one for the front is still at the "filling station" waiting for the air to come out. Then the end cap will be soft soldered, tomorrow or the day after as air bubbles are not quick to go out.

    The other picture is showing one finished front shock absorber and the various parts for the rear ones. Some are already soft soldered in place and other, like the rods/pistons are still missing.



    The rubber parts for the stabilizer were done with a Dow Corning product I have since about 30 years! OK, the curing Continental Mark II takes much longer than when the product was new; by heating it, the curing Continental Mark II is rather fast, allowing to do several parts one by one with one small quantity of mixed silicone rubber.


    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #2177

  2. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    There is nothing very exciting to report. I should continue with the exhaust system, but I have first to measure the angle of the pipes at the manifolds. I believe that the way I did the manifolds, the pipes would go down too "fast". This check will be done during spring time.

    This week, I began to study the cowl and floor of the car. I have some drawings and many pictures; I'm trying to put all the info's on a piece of paper.



    As you probably know, the cowl on this car is basically a large flat piece of sheet metal. Alas, the brass I have in various thicknesses has been extensively used and I don't have enough for large parts. I will get some at the end of next week.

    To kill the time, I'm doing the smaller parts I'm more or less sure of shape and dimensions. On this picture, there are the inner rocker panels, 2 pieces to reinforce the cowl and 2 parts which are coming on the side of the cowl. All parts are unfinished.



    Usually, cowls are flat and vertical. This is a good starting point to build-up the other elements. Not on the Mark II as the cowl in inclined towards the rear.

    I did few progresses as I had difficulties to decide with what to continue. I did a lot of planning in my head; maybe something will result from this smoking head!

    When I understood how the inner rocker panel was done at the front of the body, I could form it partially and solder it to the main inner panels. I continued with the side panels of the cowl and attached them with screws to the inner ends.

    Then I realized that this was would lead to nothing as loose parts are hard to measure. The idea came to attach the inner panels to a piece of flat sheet metal. This way, I can verify angles and dimensions.

    As the whole construction is still unstable, I will continue by attaching permanently the front part of the floor to the inner rocker panels.



    My intention was to assemble something to both cowl's sides. The logical was to go with the lower front part of the floor. But stop! It's not so easy: first I have to do both channels (or supports) at the bolts # 1. And don't forget the recess for the brake pedal!

    Once all was soldered, I noticed that I should have soldered the floor to the sides and then the front supports to the assembly (that's the logical to perform the welding at the factory). Well, I will find a way to overcome this error...

    Now, there is at least one piece of the floor which can be screwed to the frame, even if it's only temporary.



    Now, I have to trim the sides of the lower floor to adapt it to the cowl's sides...

    You have probably noticed that there is for the moment no provision for the tunnel. It will be done later, when the upper part of the cowl will maintain the whole assembly.

    I took the decision to do the back of the floor with polyester. The tunnel has a complex form; I could certainly do a mock-up with wood and bang some brass on it, but the necessary work is a non-sense as the tunnel will hardly be seen from under.

    March 3, 2012: Some progress was done lately with the cowl and floor. The inner rocker panels are soldered with the cowl's sides and I added a strip of stainless steel on the inner rocker panel as the flexion between the cowl and the floor could be critical if the model (in fact the doors) is getting heavier as expected.

    I closed also the bottom of the floor at the cowl's side. The back of the floor will be polyester, as explained earlier.

    The last addition to that inner structure is both lower heater core cases. The first picture is showing how I fixed them for soldering in an attempt to have them in the same plan.



    The whole construction is not cleaned as more soldering will occur.



    The front of the floor is attached to the frame with 4 bolts. The inner ones will not be a problem, however, I will probably not be able to screw the outer ones from inside the body as they are very near from the cowl's sides. There is a chance that I can install the outside bolts through the apertures of the heater core. This concern was also one more reason to add the steel strip. Steel is way more resistant than brass, but much more difficult to work with, especially stainless steel.




    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #2178

  3. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Lately, I did a lot of verifications about the dimensions. Some are acceptable, some are probably not. Oh! it does not go in inches, but 1 mm on that scale is not good. As long as I can correct errors, I'll do. In short: the "ears" you can see on the previous pictures (they represent one face of the door's pillars) in probably 1 mm (0.04") too much forward. This element will be hidden by the front fenders but I may have a clearance trouble with the hood's hinges. I hope somebody from the Mark II forum will help with a dimension I asked.

    I continued with the flat part of the cowl; most of the apertures are already done because it's easier to bore on a piece laying flat on the tool than later with the flexible shaft when the part will be soldered to the main structure.

    I could not resist to install temporarily the brake booster!





    Well, it was like I was afraid: something was not correct with my dimensions. Fortunately, some people at the Mark II forum helped with, I hope, a correct dimension. The forward part of the door's post was too much forward; I had to remove it. The parts did not survive the removal process, I will have to do new ones. Fortunately, they are quickly done.

    I did most holes on the cowl before it was soldered to the structure. However, not all holes were done as I missed at first the holes for the fuse box. There is also an horizontal brace which is crewed on the structure; I had the drill it when I was more or less sure about it's position.

    Due to the "legs" (the inner rocker panels), the drilling was somewhat complicated: I had to improvise with a can as you can see on the first picture. It was not very stable, but I managed to perform the drilling without damage!



    The other pictures are showing the cowl almost ready. Missing are the tunnel aperture and the pivot for the emergency brake. The holes for the hood's hinges are not yet done; they will be drilled when the hinges are done.





    You will certainly notice the 6 captive nuts for the emergency brake lever...


    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #2179

  4. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Yesterday I soldered the last bits of brass at the cowl. This damn part is looking as it would be easy to reproduce; however, there are so many details that at the end it was more complicated as anticipated. By the way, this is, surface wise, the largest sheet metal part I ever did in brass.

    Unless I forgot something, the front end of the floor/cowl is complete. I did a very short tunnel to have some rigidity during handling.

    By testing the construction on the frame with the engine, I noticed that I did an error at the inner rocker panel under the side of the cowl: I would have difficulties to install the exhaust; this error will be corrected at a later date.

    Up to recently, I did not know why the rocker panel was partial under the doors and a filler was placed under the chrome lower molding. The reason is simple: as the exhaust was installed on the frame before the body was dropped on it, the exhaust would have interfered with a full the rocker panel. At the rear of the car, the exhaust tubes are following the frame; this allows for a full rocker panel. I will have to do the same if I want to mate the body on the frame…









    Now, I will go back to the frame and do the brake shields as I got recently some good pictures. I hope to measure the floor sometimes during spring/summer to continue it.

    The replacement of my 5-years old computer was a severe "distraction" during last week. I have now Windows 7, but, frankly, Windows XP was easier to work with. It's like cars: the new model is shinier, but not necessarily better!

    Brake shields are in fact just a stamped steel disk on which the cylinder and shoes are attached. On my front brakes there will be no shoes, it makes the whole matter less complicated. However, the shield has to be formed by stamping, like the original ones!

    The first picture is showing how I'm milling the pattern. The final product will not be 100% like the original, but the overall appearance will be very similar.



    The next picture is showing the tools and a piece of brass .2 mm thick ready to be formed.



    This happens on my small wise, in several steps as I'm looking in between if the metal is not damaged, following picture.



    All went rather well; the next image is showing both shields which are identical. On the real car, there is a RH & a LH part; the stamping is the same; just the hole to adjust the shoes is at a different place.



    The last picture is showing the drum again installed on the suspension; it's definitively looking better with as without a shield.



    I have now to finish the details on the other shield; then I will go to the rear ones, first by milling another pattern.


    Continental Mark II
    Last edited by Roger Zimmermann; 03-29-19 at 06:28 AM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #2180

  5. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Back home from a short vacation (we are in April 2012), I could continue with the rear brake shields. I wasn't sure if I would have success because the center of the shields is real deep. The first picture is showing the tools and a sheet of thin brass. I could keep the base of one of the front tool and add a different punch maintained with 2 screws (the tool I'm referring is on the left).



    Then came the moment to press the brass between the tools; the next picture is showing the result at mid-"travel".



    With more pressure from the wise a good shield was born! Before I did the second one, I put some oil on the brass to facilitate the pressing. It was not a wise decision as there is more tearing near the center hole as with the first part. This tearing is not detrimental to the part, it will not be seen.

    The next picture shows one completed shield and the second one which is almost ready.



    The hole for the centering shaft was bored at 5 mm into the brass sheet; when completed the hole was almost 7 mm in diameter.

    Some details must be added, for example the bulge for the brake cable.

    It took a long time to have the brake shields ready as well as the emergency brake system. Since 2 weeks the kitchen was remodeled which add some distraction but mainly disagreements! The last work at the kitchen was done this morning; it will be good for another 35 years!

    Even if I could have a look at the Avanti model brake system, I had to improvise a little bit. Now, most of the hardware is ready with the exception of the brake cables which are too long. They will be trimmed and installed at the last moment. The cables have a diameter of .3 mm (.012") and the flexible casing is coming from a remote actuator from a camera!





    The last picture is showing also the cables with fittings.



    As I'm not in a position to continue the floor, I'm doing the annoying small details like the transmission's levers and engine control levers.

    When I was ready with the transmission's levers, there was an interference between the air duct and the selector lever. What was wrong? Fortunately, a member of the Mark II forum had the answer in pictures: the flange which was in the way is not horizontal, but at about 45°, permitting the lever to move freely. This is on the first picture; the air duct is not yet corrected.



    Then I moved to the engine control levers located on the top of the intake manifold. These levers are operating the carb and the quick-down. Compared to Cadillac, this set-up is really complex. As my car is equipped with A/C, there is also the fast idle speed-up control; "easy" to reproduce as it's the same as on Cadillac and I have a spare.







    For the moment, there is no linkage to the carb or transmission; they will of course be added. I hope that the assembly can be operated by the accelerator Continental Mark II pedal; however, the needed small springs are a concern as the wire I have is too large in diameter and would create a too stiff spring. Of course, I could buy some wire of the proper diameter...


    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #2181

  6. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    On May 2, 2012, I could visit the man who has 4 Mark II (he bought one last year; this car was in storage at his location).

    I noticed that the angle of the exhaust pipes at the collector in about 20° downwards; I will have to rework my exhaust collectors...This will add some distance between collector and the steering box.

    With all the dimensions I got yesterday, I'm now in a position to do the floor from front to rear. This will takes some months to do it. Stay tuned!

    Thanks to what I saw yesterday, I could finish the rod going to the transmission. I did also a return spring (it's not nice, it will be replaced) which is not too strong for the construction. The first picture is "idling" mode and the second one "full throttle" with the corresponding levers moving.





    For once, something large is in the works: the trunk floor. The part pictured is just one piece of brass; with careful planning, it could be done rather quickly. I have now to do the details like the rear channel, the spare wheel well and the channel under the pan near the well. The aperture for the wheel well is approximate; it will be trimmed when the well is ready. This part must be done in brass as is has to be thin. It will be a good exercise for the rest of the floor: I'm now tempted to do it all brass.



    After the large trunk floor was done, I had to do the rear channel and the one under the pan; this channel is used to assemble the floor to the frame as well as an anchor for the fuel tank.

    When the parts were done, I assembled with silver solder to the pan. I had some concerns about warping; the end result was beyond my expectations: there was a large bulge in the floor, doing "bong-bong", an indication that there was too much metal in the middle. For a while, I toyed with the idea to cut the floor to relieve the tension and excess material, but the success was not guaranteed.

    Suddenly the bright idea: there are ribs in the floor, 5 in all. Maybe the three ones in the flat part would solve the problem? Initially, I intended to reproduce the ribs with a flat strip of brass soft welded to the floor as I had the impression that the trouble to stamp the ribs were not in relation with the end result. Now, it was a little bit different! Another problem: my vice is too small to handle that task; maybe the tool used by my father would help? (sorry, I don't know the term in English). Well, yes, it did and after 2 ribs were done, the floor was flat again!

    The next pictures shows a strip of brass maintain with contact cement to the floor; the other part of the "tool" is also attached with contact cement to the other side of the pan. Then the "magic" tool and the end result.










    Continental Mark II
    Last edited by Roger Zimmermann; 03-29-19 at 07:51 AM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #2182

  7. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Now, the circle is closed! The continuation from this thread is at the page 1. If the administrator of the forum can be put the various posts in the "right" sequence, the whole report will be easier to read.


    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #2183

  8. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger Zimmermann
    Hello Roger,

    Thank you again for these postings!

    I read a lot, I have a pretty large collection of books, and of course, I, we, have access to so much now-a-days, but I prefer to read your postings to almost anything else. A first hand account of problem solving in a simple and effective way.

    Not that you will need to do this again, but for others reading, to get the Hyvis into small cylinders, one could draw it in with a vacuum? The hand pump you used to evacuate your resin Continental Mark II , could have been attached to the cylinders end, dipping the "mouth" into the oil and draw it up into the cylinder by vacuum?

    Or, using a plastic syringe, sold in pet stores for feeding baby birds, or some wood shops for appling glue, back fill the syringe, like a grease gun, and inject the oil into the tube?

    Thank you again, - I continue to show your work to new people, a friend who does jewelry is very much impressed with your skills and tenacity! She has taught at the college level, and says that in the future she will show her students these postings, your postings, to encourage those young people to explore the mechanical side of life. That beauty is not just flowers and other organic shapes, but can be seen in the work of men, now anonymous, who worked together to make useful things.

    -Don
    Last edited by MODEL A MODEL; 03-29-19 at 03:14 PM.
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #2184

  9. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Thank for your comments, Don!
    The Hyvis is not an oil, its much sticking and thicker; I could compare it roughly to fresh pitch from some trees.
    As one end of the shock absorber is closed with the rod and its "bearing", no vacuum can be applied at this end.
    A plastic syringe may be usable; its a good idea.
    Your friend will have a lot of work to encourage young people to explore the mechanical side of life! If my work can influence just one, it will be a great victory!


    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #2185

  10. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger Zimmermann
    Hello Roger, anything further from the Toronado Club?


    Do I need to get a subscription to get a copy of the issue featuring your work?


    I’ve got folders on Conti, and Olive, Wingrove and Baigent, I better start one on you? Before you get too famous!😀
    QUOTE QUOTE #2186

  11. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Don, I heard nothing from the Toronado Club. I have no idea if they want to do something about my model or not. In fact, I don't care! Don't forget: I'm not American. For some people in your country, it's like to be a white negro.


    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #2187

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