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    1. Kit: ME, by (Yearly Subscriber) MODEL A MODEL is offline
      Builder Last Online: Feb 2019 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/4 Rating:  Thanks: 2
      Started: 06-09-17 Build Revisions: Never  
      Supported Attribution Scratch Built

      Mieaux vaut tard que jamais! (Better late than never!)

      Well, its been a very long time since I last finished a model! The Beatles were still hoped to reunite! and Nixon was just about to be toppled!
      (Also, this is my first scratch built A Model A Model, (finally!) model!)

      Both of the above statements are true, however, I have studied model making my whole life, and been around it and model makers, since I was just a little Donald. I was the manager of Paul Freiler's Historical Models for half my life, at the time I left it. I then did a too short stint making models for the movies. I worked in Northrops display model group for a few months, and I have been working in the concept car field for nineteen years!

      I am afraid that I might have been "Hijacking" some of your threads, I do go on and on! but never of course was that my intent, and if I have offended anyone? please accept my apologies!

      All that said, here I go!


      A Model A Model, (finally!)
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  1. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    Almost there! This is the smaller half of my mold, and it has the thinner A Model A Model, (finally!) walls. It has only to shrink 2mm more to have achieved 15% shrinkage. The shrinkage on this half has been evening out. I did make many cuts into the outside surface to increase the surface area, and improve upon the de-gassing of the mineral spirits A Model A Model, (finally!) .

    The other half continues to shrink as well, but not at the same rate.

    Maybe another week?




    A Model A Model, (finally!)
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #77

  2. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    What an expriment!
    QUOTE QUOTE #78

  3. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    Well, the shrinkage seems to have leveled off at around 13%. -I poured a "fast cast" to better evaluate the progress, and to give myself something to work with. -I should have planned this better, but it turned out OK.

    Besides a little clean up, I need to thicken the wings, and maybe a little enhancing of some details. -the wings will grow thinner A Model A Model, (finally!) with each shrinking, and would be as thin as a razor with the next casting A Model A Model, (finally!) , so, I have to bow to practicality over scale.


    Researching this technique further, I have found out that besides Mineral Spirits A Model A Model, (finally!) , Naptha, Toluene, and Xylene can be used. -and that shrinkages as much as 75% may be possible! The important consideration is to measure volumes and not weight.

    Supposedly:

    a 75% reduction could be achieved by mixing 1 part catalyzed A Model A Model, (finally!) RTV A Model A Model, (finally!) with 3 parts solvent.
    60% reduction = 1 part catalyzed A Model A Model, (finally!) RTV A Model A Model, (finally!) with 2 parts solvent,
    and, so on . . .

    We'll see.


    A Model A Model, (finally!)
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #79

  4. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    Well? It has been too long since I worked on anything! I still have a lot more molding and casting A Model A Model, (finally!) to do with my incredible shrinking quail, -But, today I re-started playing with my hydraulic press, and the pattern I made,?, I forget when I made that. -anyway, I have bought some Nickel-Silver, (Thank you Markus!)

    And today I thought to play.

    I purchased some sheet 0.032" or 0.813mm (hard). -In Copper or Aluminum, this thickness would not be an issue. But I didn't know about Nickel-Silver.

    Also bought some bar stock, 1" and 1/2", and 1/8th" to play with on the lathe. I have ordered some "Dead soft" sheet, but it won't show for another week!

    I was expecting to destroy my pattern, the Nickel-Silver seems so hard, I did my best to anneal carefully, and to my surprise! my plexi-glass pattern worked!

    I am making another pattern out of Aluminum this time, and will try it with the "Dead-Soft" sheets when they show.

    This first picture is of the Nickel-Silver's first pass through my press. I did anneal it before pressing, and before every other subsequent pressing, or hammering, or even cutting and grinding. I was a little paranoid about fatigue cracks.

    A Model A Model, (finally!)-img_6639-2-jpg

    This second picture was taken after several cycles of pressing, annealing, trimming, pressing , more annealing, and some hammering thrown in on a "as I guessed I needed to" basis.

    A Model A Model, (finally!)-img_6642-jpg

    And, this last picture is of the moment when a tortured piece of metal, starts to look like a usable part. An instrument cluster.

    A Model A Model, (finally!)-img_6650-jpg

    I still have a lot of fine tuning to do, but I can see the potential. I do recommend trying Nickel-Silver, or as Markus would say "German-Silver", -it polishes up very nicely, and it looks like Stainless Steel. (however, metalurgically speaking it should be considered a Brass, with 18% Nickel.) (The alloy that I have is #752.)

    Drilling, sawing, soldering just like Brass. It should turn the same, we'll see.

    I also bought an ingot of Zinc, and want to do some casting A Model A Model, (finally!) with sand A Model A Model, (finally!) , and investment type molds. -I thought of a technique a few years ago, that I never tried, and I found out recently, that "my" technique is actually used commercially!

    2019 may be fun yet!

    PS- I also need to look into etching and/or engraving this stuff! Ferric Chloride should work? (I never trust the word "should")

    PPS- I did solder some bits together, soft solder with my resistance soldering unit, and then took them into work and sand A Model A Model, (finally!) -blasted them. The appearance is much like Cast Iron, or a work-aged Aluminum casting A Model A Model, (finally!) . I have only one grit at work, but different media, coarseness, will create different effects.


    A Model A Model, (finally!)
    Last edited by MODEL A MODEL; 01-03-19 at 04:44 AM.
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #80

  5. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    I have already started on a new and better pattern, this one out of Aluminum. I will change the orientation some, and I need to be a little more careful about some of the details.

    A Model A Model, (finally!)-img_6653-2-jpg

    The "Dead-Soft" sheets did show up today, and in addition to being "soft" they are also half the thickness of this, my first try. -The Nickle-Silver is a pretty good color match, for the original 1930/31 instrument cluster. (the original clusters were Nickle plated A Model A Model, (finally!) .

    A Model A Model, (finally!)-size-fourth-scale-2-jpg

    Looks like I'm going to be busy this weekend.


    PS- Many years ago I picked up a small pantograph, and it is my hope that I will be able to use it with the actual article to engrave all those lines, and establish the locations of the holes. (my hope.)

    PPS- I spent a good part of yesterday grinding and filing a new pattern. -and reworking my first pressing. Becoming more confident in the use and abuse of Nickel Silver. I do recommend its use. If the subject your modeling originally had a Stainless Steel or Nickel Plated A Model A Model, (finally!) radiator, try working in Nickle Silver.

    A Model A Model, (finally!)-img_6661-jpg

    The above is one piece of Nickle Silver, formed just as the prototype article was. - Presented here after having been annealed, formed, trimmed, annealed, trimmed, ground, filed, annealed, many, many tines. To see how far I could go, I took it up to a high polish, then decided to rework some surfaces and contours, imbedding it into my pitch bowl, reworking it, and repeating the whole process yet again. Stopping short of a high polish.

    Again, this stuff should be called White Brass, as it is an alloy of Copper 60%, Zinc 20%, and Nickle 20%. (actually this alloy is 65/17/18) -and it has all the characteristics of Brass. Drill, file, sand A Model A Model, (finally!) , turn and soldering the same. Polishes up very easily, and then looks like Stainless Steel, or a Nickle Plating.


    A Model A Model, (finally!)
    Last edited by MODEL A MODEL; 01-09-19 at 03:33 AM.
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #81

  6. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    Every lunch break this week, I have been slowly dialing in my new pattern. -a lot of subtle curves. Trying to keep everything balanced.

    A Model A Model, (finally!)-pattern-hydraulic-press-jpg

    A Model A Model, (finally!)-little-filing-grinding-sanding-jpg

    Initially blocked out with a band-saw, a little help from my Dremel A Model A Model, (finally!) tool, and then just a lot of rolled up sandpaper, and elbow grease.


    I intend to use this pattern with the "dead soft" Nickle-Silver sheets, make several pressings, experiment with etching, and engraving. - I'll have to assemble my pantograph first, actually I have to find all the parts to the pantograph, and assemble it and then figure out how to make it do what I want!


    A Model A Model, (finally!)
    Last edited by MODEL A MODEL; 01-10-19 at 02:12 PM.
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #82

  7. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    Started late today, finished my aluminum pattern, annealed and pressed the thinner A Model A Model, (finally!) sheet stock, trimmed one too short, but it's all a learning process.

    A Model A Model, (finally!)-img_6683-2-jpg

    A Model A Model, (finally!)-img_6694-jpg

    A very different experience working with this thinner A Model A Model, (finally!) stock. I had a less delicate feel with my first attempt.

    A Model A Model, (finally!)-img_6691-2-jpg

    A cold and wet day, and someone nearby must have startled a skunk! Unpleasant to be working out back so I spent most of the day rereading my books.

    A Model A Model, (finally!)-img_6700-2-jpg

    A Model A Model, (finally!)-img_6711-2-jpg


    A Model A Model, (finally!)
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #83

  8. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Trying always to improve on my techniques, and to think about what I'm doing, I created a recessed area in a portable "pedestal" Allowing me to drop my forming tool into it to use as a hammer-form.

    A Model A Model, (finally!)-recessed-cut-aluminum-plate-drop-pattern-hammeri-jpg

    A Model A Model, (finally!)-copper-scrap-wrapped-clamp-pad-help-hold-pressed-metal-mar-jpg

    A scrap of Copper was wrapped around the end of my clamp to help protect the Nickle-Silver surface.

    A Model A Model, (finally!)-pressing-annealing-hammering-psttern-jpg

    After much annealing, and returning to the press, and more annealing, and hammering with the use of wood "caulking tools"




    A Model A Model, (finally!)
    Last edited by MODEL A MODEL; 02-03-19 at 04:18 PM.
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #84

  9. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Making time after work to torture some Copper.

    Not pretty, but I am learning!

    Learning as I go. How better to hold the work while I pound on it. Choice of materials for my punches, the values of wood versus metal. -And of that, the benefits of different shapes, and how to apply the strikes. All the time developing a better sense for when to anneal.

    A Model A Model, (finally!)-trying-front-cross-jpg

    A Model A Model, (finally!)-front-cross-mess-jpg

    Roger is probably right, in suggesting to me that I'll have to make this part out of several pieces, soldered together. -I had wanted to duplicate the chassis components as much like the actual parts. Being all stamped from a single piece of steel. -And maybe I will continue with my original plan to make a pair of conforming dies, and try to press a part or two?


    A Model A Model, (finally!)
    Last edited by MODEL A MODEL; 02-13-19 at 04:43 AM.
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #85

  10. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Don, don't forget that a part which seems to be done in one shoot could in fact be made with 2 or 3 different dies. Just look at some vintage car factory videos; it's for me always interesting to see how many steps are needed to stamp a roof or a door skin. Take for example the real front fender from the Mark II: it's not done in one piece but with at least 2!
    For your tentative, I would prefer a metal die vs a wood one. The big problem is that to fabricate the die in metal is requiring a disproportional amount of work and resources for just one part.
    My idea by modelling: do it as simple as you can, but it must be good looking after all needed steps!
    QUOTE QUOTE #86

  11. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Thanks Roger,

    Your right of course. This piece is my second try, and may still be made usable. "Micro-metalsmithing", or to be fair, in my case "mini-metalsmithing" (your the "micro-metalsmith!) is a self taught activity. I can honestly say that every session at it, I am learning.

    The simplest way to make this part would be to make the pattern and vacuum form a sheet of styrene A Model A Model, (finally!) . -I could be done, and then maybe use that plastic part to pour an Epoxy A Model A Model, (finally!) "Steel" die, pour two, both sides, forming a set, and then try my luck at the hydraulic press? I have some epoxy A Model A Model, (finally!) somewhere, not sure of its shelf life?

    Lots to learn!

    PS- I could also create sand A Model A Model, (finally!) molds and pour a low temperature metal, again creating conforming dies. OR, -I could lay up a fiber-glass part, but I wouldn't learn from that, I already know how to lay up fiber-glass. I also have concerns about longevity with articles made with resins.


    A Model A Model, (finally!)
    Last edited by MODEL A MODEL; 02-13-19 at 11:04 AM.
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #87

  12. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Reading up on silversmithing, the shape I'm trying to make is called ANTICLASTIC. Big word. It is considered to be one of the harder shapes to make, and this chassis cross member has two of them side by side. -So?- I think that if I divide the form in two I will be better able to make something useful.

    Every night after my day job, I clear my desk and do battle. Lots of hammering, a little learning, bit of a work-out, and I have been making notes of what is working, and what isn't.

    I'm not going to post every attempt, but maybe I can cut up some of what I've got? to cobble together a final part?


    A Model A Model, (finally!)
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #88

  13. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    The difference between us both: When I am beginning a project, I'm doing it! If it does not go in one piece, then in 2 or more! But, the most important: if you like your studies, do them and have fun!
    QUOTE QUOTE #89

  14. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Hello Roger,

    Well, no work today, my day job ran me ragged. -I do think that I have a new plan, a new way of looking at the problems that I have set before myself. It's pretty clear in my minds eye. -I just have to make the time to get it done. (I have certainly explored a way to not do it!)

    The difference between us, I think, is that you are a more linear thinker. I am saying this as two friends talking. -and I am THE lateral thinker! I always have been. I can think of ten ways to do almost anything, read of a few more, try several, watch a few videos, (time means little to me), and after all that, I still will not have made any progress!

    My reason for choosing to make a Ford Model A, is not any great love for the car, (I do like them, but . . . ) but to use it as a learning project. Ford Model A's are very likely the best documented car, here in the U.S.A. A distant second is probably the Volkswagen Beetle. I can purchase, beg or borrow actual components. And there are several societies involved with their restorations, and club magazines filled with information. Judging guide-lines are published and updated regularly. And regional clubs, regional meets, a whole field to tap into for support and information. -I chose the Model A precisely because I wanted my work to be scrutinized by well informed people. I have a little of an art education, and I know of the value of group critiques, and/or my skin is not so thin that I cannot accept unsolicited criticism.

    I hope to establish a portfolio of works, that I then can use to approach owners or museums of subjects that I am in love with.

    I want to be seen as a craftsman, and to let my labors speak for themselves.

    -Don


    A Model A Model, (finally!)
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #90

  15. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Another difference between us: if I'm doing a model in scale, it's because I like it! I understand you rationale about the Ford A and with that popularity in the US, you will not be confronted with the difficulties I had to do my models. I was lucky to get from GM blueprints for the frame and underbody for the Toronado; I had regrets at that time that I had nothing for the body. Fortunately, a Toronado was located in the town I was living and I went with the bicycle plus paper and a cheap analog camera to document what was needed.
    The Avanti is the less accurate model of the three because...well, Avanti cars are not very common here! (and in the US either)
    I was fortunate to have a good support from the Mark II forum members with pictures and dimensions and especially because at 8 or 10 miles there were 4 cars in various stages of disrepair!
    If I understand well your thinking, you choose that (for me just an old car) Ford A to exercise and improve your skills. Why not? If you succeed, it may be a nice scale model. Just think less and do more!
    QUOTE QUOTE #91

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