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    1. Kit: , by (Established Member) Mr.Tin is offline
      Builder Last Online: Dec 2018 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/8 Rating:  Thanks: 0
      Started: 10-18-11 Build Revisions: Never  
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      Hi all, since the link to my McLaren seems to have elicited only one response I thought I'd try posting a photo on the post. So here's a Birdcage Maserati chassis I did in 1/12th. It was measured from the Hill/Gurney car which a neighbour was restoring along with no less than FOUR others!
      He went on to
      a) employ my son and
      b) restore another 4 plus the Streamliner which had to be completely rebodied due a very inaccurate body having been fitted! So all those allegedly accurate models you've seen made up until about 2007 weren't!!
      Anyway, here goes:-
      Mr.Tin
      Birdcage Maserati chassis in 1/12th scale-allmas-jpg
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  1. sydeem's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Sydney
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    You have to believe everyone looks at your thread but when you do such amazing work most are too intimidated to reply. Just believe that a hundred modelers are drooling and trying to understand why they cant achieve the detail. Because of guys like you I post my builds to encourage the less advantaged to not be intimidated from posting or we would only have about four active posters.
    Syd
    QUOTE QUOTE #2

  2. ScaleMotorcars's Avatar Administrator
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    Daniel
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    Sometimes words just fail especially with work like this. I encourage you to post more images. Its the pictured that really draw a crowd. If you want to do one better then show us how you did. Allot of guys just shake their heads in amazement and feel they could never achieve such an amazing builds. That's when guys like you show them the way.
    QUOTE QUOTE #3

  3. Ton's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Ton
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    Hi Martin,

    The birdcage is work of art. I have the CMC chassis on my desk but your work is much more inspiring. Somewhere in the stack I also have a Make-up 1:12 resin Birdcage Maserati chassis in 1/12th scale model which I will start some day.
    Regards

    Ton
    QUOTE QUOTE #4

  4. Mr.Tin's Avatar Established Member
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    Martin
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    Syd,
    I don't do it for applause. I like to help people with techniques where I can and to show that it isn't actually that difficult. It can be fiddly, tedious even, but it's no mystery. The Birdcage, for instance was measured, photographed, drawn and made to nearly what you see in the picture in about 17 days. That perhaps is the difference between an amateur and a professional. Speed, which isn't important to the pure hobbyist. Whereas I needed to feed the family! I am entirely self taught. I did my first model boat for a client when I was 17 and it had to be good because boy, did I ever need the money! It's been pretty much the same ever since!
    When I saw a forum where people actually MAKE stuff I was keen to take part, not go in for the bragging rights.
    I don't need that, but I do like to encourage, help, advise where I have something to offer.

    You'll note I am a much better modelmaker than a photographer!

    Cheers,
    Martin


    Birdcage Maserati chassis in 1/12th scale
    A man needs a plan...and a shed
    QUOTE QUOTE #5

  5. Mr.Tin's Avatar Established Member
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    Martin
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    Ton,
    thanks for the kind words. Funnily enough the French guy who bought the chassis model from me was putting it under a Make-Up body. I told him that unless the Make-Up body was unusually thin, the chassis wouldn't fit as it was exactly to scale. He didn't seem to care and paid me on the nail. I never heard another thing from him.
    I intended to carve the body buck in wood and then beat an aluminium body over it, but he wanted what I'd done and insisted on paying "Wingrove" money for it, so naturally I sold it. Apologies to Gerald.

    This kind of job is really just a question of accurate measurement and drawing and a bit of a knack for clean soldering, which is easily learned and practised. OK, I was a bit proud of that tiny gear selector which works in a gate and the 1mm diameter steel ball joints in the throttle linkage, but they're all a case of plan it, do it and try again when you cock it up...and you will at first!

    Cheers,
    Martin


    Birdcage Maserati chassis in 1/12th scale
    A man needs a plan...and a shed
    QUOTE QUOTE #6

  6. ScaleMotorcars's Avatar Administrator
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    Daniel
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    Wingrove money. I like it.
    Gerald's a member, I'm sure he'd fine with it.
    QUOTE QUOTE #7

  7. Mr.Tin's Avatar Established Member
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    Martin
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    Daniel, it was the only way I could think of putting it across the French guy that I wasn't going to give it away like so much fine modelmaking. So I told him it would cost him "Wingrove money" because I didn't really want to sell it, but when he offered some serious spondoolicks, I had to think of the family. That is, after all, why we work, I guess.

    Here's another couple of shots. the steering wheel is made of 24 pieces of pear veneer round an aluminium spoke and rim core. the steering column has three (IIRC!) universal joints in miniature with actual spiders in the centre like a Hardy Spicer, held in with separate caps on each of the four spider "arms". The steering rack also works, but overscale friction made that a bit stiff.
    The suspension works and the gear stick works in a scale gate and has to be pushed down against a spring to engage first and reverse with a flip over detent. That assembly is around 1/4" cube.
    It was a fascinating project.
    Martin
    Birdcage Maserati chassis in 1/12th scale-field1-jpgBirdcage Maserati chassis in 1/12th scale-field2-jpg


    Birdcage Maserati chassis in 1/12th scale
    Attached Images Attached Images Birdcage Maserati chassis in 1/12th scale-maschas-jpg 
    QUOTE QUOTE #8

  8. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Jeffrey
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    Just like everyone else, I'm completely floored. Your work is first rate and I'm jealous. Just fantastic.
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #9

  9. Ton's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Ton
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    I guess your french customer had a problem because the body is one big lumb of resin Birdcage Maserati chassis in 1/12th scale But the finished make-up model and your chassis would be a great display!
    Regards

    Ton
    QUOTE QUOTE #10

  10. Mr.Tin's Avatar Established Member
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    Martin
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    Ah, maybe that was his idea. After all, the chassis is all but lost under the body, so maybe he displayed them separately.
    I shall never know!
    Thanks for the kind words, but really, if you can solder, you can do it. The aluminium parts are just good old K&S Birdcage Maserati chassis in 1/12th scale Metal Centre. Their ally is superb for general work and nice and thin. But their sheet brass is horrible gooey yellow stuff. For thin metal, I recommend nickel silver which can be bought from model railway suppliers, unless you can get half hard brass in your preferred thicknesses. You need CZ120 for sheet, CZ121 for sections.
    Cheers,
    Martin


    Birdcage Maserati chassis in 1/12th scale
    A man needs a plan...and a shed
    QUOTE QUOTE #11

  11. Ton's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Ton
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    One day!.....and I will give a try: I love soldering! But don't you need a resistance soldering unit? All these joints are so close!
    Regards

    Ton
    QUOTE QUOTE #12

  12. Mr.Tin's Avatar Established Member
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    Martin
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    Ton,
    I don't even know what a resistance soldering unit is. Sounds like alchemy to me. I used a standard 65Watt stick iron with solder that has some silver in it apparently (£1 from the Chinese junk shop) and a pot of Superflux. I always use extra flux. Make the joint quickly and there's no risk of melting the previous one. Failing that use a heat sink, like a pair of aluminium forceps, but I never had the need. I used to hold the chassis member with my fingers and make the joint before the heat burnt me. On one of the pictures you can see the jigs that I used to hold inboard front suspension mounts in "mid-air" for soldering. That was the only really difficult bit of the job.
    Believe me, I spend almost nothing on my models!!

    Cheers,
    Martin


    Birdcage Maserati chassis in 1/12th scale
    A man needs a plan...and a shed
    QUOTE QUOTE #13

  13. Dunny1's Avatar Active Member
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    Bryan
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    I love your work, could you post a few more close up photos.
    QUOTE QUOTE #14

  14. Ton's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Ton
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    Martin,

    The old fashioned soldering :-) I thought there was only one strength of Flux. This is the modern alchemy

    [B]THE BASICS:[/B] WHAT IS RESISTANCE SOLDERING?Resistance soldering is the name applied to a technique where the heat to melt solder (or strip wire) is instantaneously generated by passing a high amerage electrical current through a resistive material. There are three key components of resistance soldering:A specialized step-down transformer that will generate the appropriate current
    A resistive material to generate the heat
    The ability to complete an electrical circuit

    [B]THE ADVANTAGES:[/B] WHY SHOULD I TRY RESISTANCE SOLDERING?Heating is instantaneous and confined to solder connection. This helps the user to easily create a more professional solder joint.
    Resistance soldering is [B]many times faster[/B] than soldering with traditional irons.
    Resistance soldering handpieces cool extremely fast, reducing risk of serious injury.
    Resistance soldering electrodes and elements last 2-3 times longer than traditional soldering iron tips, greatly reducing replacement costs.
    Resistance soldering systems are easily customized to particular applications, helping to achieve optimum soldeirng results with minimum effort and training.
    Footswitch allows the ability to “cold fixture”, creating a free hand for the operator.
    Perfect for work in confined spaces.
    Handpieces are considerably lighter than a soldering iron, thereby reducing operator fatigue.
    More efficient use of electricity creates savings on power consumption costs.
    Many difficult soldering applications, including heatsink problems, are best solved with the concentrated and controlled heat that resistance soldering systems provide.
    Regards

    Ton
    QUOTE QUOTE #15

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