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    1. Kit: , by (VIP/Sponsor) xken is offline
      Builder Last Online: Nov 2019 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/8 Rating:  (3 votes - 5.00 average) Thanks: 0
      Started: 10-07-11 Build Revisions: Never  
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      I have all the reference materials including the real car in my garage to build this. This will be a follow on tutorial to the Model T build with a more complicated subject that will take a great deal more time to build. A this point I am not really sure where I will end up but hope to learn more about building cars instead of planes and have a little fun doing it.
      Brass Build 1962 Jaguar XKE Roadster-xke-engine-001-jpg
      Here is the start of the engine by locating the cylinders. I usually start my builds with the engine which is generally the most difficult and time consuming part of the build. Here I have marked, center punch and starting with a smaller drill bit; drilling the holes. Initially the two sheets were spray glued together to locate the holes, then separated for subsequent drilling.
      Brass Build 1962 Jaguar XKE Roadster-xke-engine-002-jpg
      I drilled holes progressively larger to one size below the finished size. This was done for both parts of the top and bottom of the block, which are the scribe lines on the sheets.
      I then used a larger ream to very carefully sneak up on a press fit for each cylinder tube. The press fit is critical for holding the parts in space while being soldered. This start will be the foundation of the engine assembly.
      Brass Build 1962 Jaguar XKE Roadster-xke-engine-003-jpg
      Here the first sheet has been reamed with cylinder walls press fit in place. The engine drawing at 1/8th scale is in the background.
      Brass Build 1962 Jaguar XKE Roadster-xke-engine-004-jpg
      Here the second sheet has been clamped to the first to be matched. In using a drill press drift and out of round will occur, the ream gets the holes back to round for a press fit. The second sheet once clamped in place need trimming to match and this was accomplished very carefully using a sharp X-acto blade and the first sheet as the pattern to match to. The blade will carve away the brass and work slowly to not only achieve the match but also the press fit.

      Build Photos

      Brass Build 1962 Jaguar XKE Roadster-jaguar-jpg 


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  1. ScaleMotorcars's Avatar Administrator
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    Daniel
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    I see you still have that huge penny around...
    QUOTE QUOTE #17

  2. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Jeffrey
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    'm following this one carefully. I'm in the middle of doing the Monogram kit. Take all the time you need for this one, Ken. I'm not going anywhere.
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #18

  3. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Kenneth
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    Hot Brass Build 1962 Jaguar XKE Roadster Ford Coupe,

    Save this link if you are building the Monogram Jag. Read the description under each image or just click on the image to see more pictures. Some are just engines some are full car restoration. Save for future reference. Enjoy!

    Ken

    Classic Jaguar engine department
    QUOTE QUOTE #19

  4. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Kenneth
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    Now to make the internal crankshaft support walls. Here 5 identical pieces were traced,cut out ganged together and finish filed to correct size. The half round is for the crankshaft bearing area. Each piece was then final fitted to their respective position.

    Brass Build 1962 Jaguar XKE Roadster-xke-engine-016-jpg
    Soldering the pieces in place is a tricky operation and you can now understand why the side walls were left open. I cut a tube representing the crankshaft bearing diameter and press fit to inside the length of the block.
    First the two end pieces were soldered in place using the tube to press down and hold while being soldered.
    Then I wrapped the tube with masking Brass Build 1962 Jaguar XKE Roadster tape to act as a spring to hold the subsequent pieces in place. The key is to make sure to stay centered side to side.as well.
    Brass Build 1962 Jaguar XKE Roadster-xke-engine-017-jpg
    Here you can see all parts soldered in place both at the top flange and at the cylinder location. Once the top flange was soldered in place the locations at the cylinder walls were soldered with a very hot Brass Build 1962 Jaguar XKE Roadster iron and holding at 90 degrees to allow the solder to flow down the wall joint between the cylinder openings. This is the reason the side walls were left open to allow access with the soldering iron to flow the joint.
    Brass Build 1962 Jaguar XKE Roadster-xke-engine-018-jpg
    Once the walls were in place and excess solder cleaned away the left side of the block was closed up. First the piece was soldered in place, then additional soldered was flowed in place with a hot Brass Build 1962 Jaguar XKE Roadster iron to puddle and form the radii along the block. Below is the finished raw soldered joint cleaned with acetone on a Q-tip. This is a good practice to adopt before filing so as not to dull files with the residue flux.
    Brass Build 1962 Jaguar XKE Roadster-xke-engine-019-jpg

    Here is the side cleaned of the excess solder using the back edge of an X-acto blade as a scraper and assorted files and finished with a Scotchbrite pad.
    Brass Build 1962 Jaguar XKE Roadster-xke-engine-020-jpg

    Next I will close the right side to provide a super strong structure, then all the little details on the block will be added and fussed with including the crankshaft bearing locations.

    Ken
    Last edited by xken; 10-15-11 at 11:38 AM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #20

  5. Ton's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Ton
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    Ken, do you use a resistance soldering unit?
    Regards

    Ton
    QUOTE QUOTE #21

  6. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Kenneth
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    Ton,

    No, just the big iron below, everything so far has been soldered with this very iron. If anyone wishes to purchase one I suggest looking at a Stained Glass supplier outlet; most other retailers do not offer them this big and wattage. This one is about 34 years old, buy an extra chisel tip if you buy an iron.

    Keep a wet sponge on a ceramic plate handy to wipe the tip clean when soldering.

    Ken

    QUOTE QUOTE #22

  7. Ton's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Ton
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    That is a big one! No problems with other soldered parts that disconnect through the heat?
    Regards

    Ton
    QUOTE QUOTE #23

  8. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Kenneth
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    Ton,

    I just have to be careful and plan ahead. Every now and then I have to use heat sinks to protect parts from overheating. Soldering is an acquired skill that improves with practice. Most people tend to not use enough heat to get the solder to flow as it should and end up with cold joints that look lumpy. Reapplying flux and higher heat could easily solve their problems.

    I only have to use a flame torch for really thick or large assemblies.

    Daniel is in the process of rebuilding the Model T build which shows a good selection of parts and assemblies I have put together. Check it out if you have not already.

    Ken
    QUOTE QUOTE #24

  9. ScaleMotorcars's Avatar Administrator
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    Daniel
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    I was thinking the same thing myself but I know he has the old 150w handheld he showed us before.

    Personally I think its has magical powers because I cant find an iron anywhere that does what his does. That or Ken is incredibly patient.
    QUOTE QUOTE #25

  10. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Kenneth
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    Daniel, no magic, soldering is an acquired skill that anyone on this site can master with practice to develop the skill and yes patience is a key factor.

    Grasshopper ...."You must become one with the iron!"

    Closing the right side of the block required more complicated forming. I always mention planning ahead when scratch building, here is a good example. I soldered two flanges to the inside edge of the block lengthwise to provide mating surfaces to the wall pieces.

    The a slightly wider piece .015" sheet was then cut and annealed. Again non-ferrous metals are annealed by heating with a propane torch until you see a shadow follow the flame consistently; then quench in water. The curve was then hand formed using tube as a forming mandrel. The dark color is from the annealing and is easily cleaned off.
    Brass Build 1962 Jaguar XKE Roadster-xke-engine-021-jpg

    Below the formed piece is set in place, fussing was needed to get an almost perfect fit prior to soldering.
    Brass Build 1962 Jaguar XKE Roadster-xke-engine-022-jpg
    Below the part soldered in place with excess solder cleaned away.
    Brass Build 1962 Jaguar XKE Roadster-xke-engine-023-jpg
    The next tricky part was a brake formed part with a 90 degree bend at the top and a slight angle at the bottom with the vertical wall perpendicular to the ground. The bottom edge was butt soldered to the top edge of the curved lower part.

    This is the finished basic block assembly ready for details to be added.
    Brass Build 1962 Jaguar XKE Roadster-xke-engine-025-jpg
    Here is a closeup view of the formed parts showing the value of butt joints; the wall stock is a consistent .015" forming the pocket for the timing chain assembly. These walls will be further thicken to the required dimension and bolt bosses. This was why the mating flanges were important so the walls could extend beyond the block as well as having a surface to solder to.
    Brass Build 1962 Jaguar XKE Roadster-xke-engine-024-jpg

    Ken
    Last edited by xken; 10-16-11 at 09:35 AM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #26

  11. Ctype's Avatar Active Member
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    Bill
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    Ken, With this build going on, you have inspired me to take the leap from plastic to brass. Your work with an iron is incredible. I have a couple of quick questions. What do you use for flux and solder? I looked over the Model T build, but couldn't find the answer there. Also, is the building of the engines interior a personal choice, or will the engine be shown with the head off at times? I like it a lot better than the clunky exterior only engine I'm working on. Might just start over. - again.

    Bill
    QUOTE QUOTE #27

  12. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Kenneth
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    Bill,

    I use Staybrite solder and flux.This can be purchased Through MicroMark or more cost effectively through your local welding supply outlet, ours is named Albright's Welding Supply. The solder comes in rolls and various thicknesses. I use the 1/32" thick as pictured. Their flux is also available in pints and quarts as well.
    Brass Build 1962 Jaguar XKE Roadster-dscn0187-jpg

    As for the engine build it is just a personal challenge at this point. Like the model T the pistons will work off the crankshaft and may drive the rear wheels. I may just do a video of the internals working like I did with the Model T, it is somewhere on You Tube.

    Ken
    QUOTE QUOTE #28

  13. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Kenneth
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    Getting started with the block detailing. Here I am starting on the left side and those that have the Monogram kit will start to see the many details that are lacking on it's engine.

    First I cut the reinforcing pad area by the combustion chamber and filed the radius on the lower edge. Then located the the standing post that was taper turned on the lather and taped with 0-80 Brass Build 1962 Jaguar XKE Roadster threads prior to being soldered in place on the pad. Then locations for the upper bolt pads were drilled to receive 1/16" tubes soldered in place and then drilled and tapped for 00-90 Brass Build 1962 Jaguar XKE Roadster bolts with washers added. The tube helped locate the washers that formed the pad areas. Tubes were then filed flush to the surface of the washers.
    Brass Build 1962 Jaguar XKE Roadster-xke-engine-026-jpg
    Below can be seen the adding of the casting Brass Build 1962 Jaguar XKE Roadster bosses using 1/16" rod. Here the location holes were drilled and reamed for a tight press fit which was enhanced by adding solder to the end of the rod that was then force fit into the hole and then soldered in place. The tight fit will hold the rods in place once the pad is finally soldered in place down the road.

    Those not familiar with reams, they are hardened tapered square tools used to enlarge the diameter of holes. These come in sets and are extremely valuable tools to obtain press fits.
    Brass Build 1962 Jaguar XKE Roadster-xke-engine-028-jpg
    Here a second shorter tapered boss is added to the trimmed flange at the bottom of the block, a tooth pick is used to hold the part in place during the soldering operation.
    Brass Build 1962 Jaguar XKE Roadster-xke-engine-027-jpg
    Here the pad is bolted in place for now, all drilled holes are tapped 00-90 Brass Build 1962 Jaguar XKE Roadster to be used to clamp parts in place for soldering. The three spaced across the center are for the freeze plugs. The two at the bottom left are for the engine mount, others will be for the generator mounting brackets, one of which is yet to be added.

    The pencil marks are locations for more casting Brass Build 1962 Jaguar XKE Roadster bosses.
    Brass Build 1962 Jaguar XKE Roadster-xke-engine-029-jpg

    As I said earlier this is a slow tedious process to detail the engine. If anyone has questions please feel free to ask.

    Ken
    QUOTE QUOTE #29

  14. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Kenneth
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    More details being added.

    Ton asked earlier about small parts staying put. Here is one technique, the casting Brass Build 1962 Jaguar XKE Roadster bosses pads were cut and then drilled for 1/32" rod. Pads located and holes drilled in sidewall. Then the rod was inserted through both and flood soldered in place. The excess solder then cleaned away and the boss filed flat. Looking close you may be able to see the pins.

    Brass Build 1962 Jaguar XKE Roadster-xke-engine-030-jpg

    Here the pads are soldered in place and cleaned. Here you will also see the benefit of the top reinforcing piece being bolted in place so it can be removed to allow room for the iron.

    Brass Build 1962 Jaguar XKE Roadster-xke-engine-031-jpg

    Here is another technique for a small part.The generator bolt bosses were first taper turned on a lathe and drilled with a 3/64' drill bit and the mating end filed to the needed angle. The holes in the side wall were then reamed to accept the 3/64" tube. The picture below shows the bosses in place prior to soldering using 1/32" rod for clarity.

    Brass Build 1962 Jaguar XKE Roadster-xke-engine-032-jpg

    Below you can see the 3/64" tube inserted and being used to locate, hold and keep vertical the boss while being soldered. Note the soldered flow, this is what a really good solder joint should look like when the correct amount of flux and heat is used. The boss and tube should all be soldered in place.

    Once soldered in place the tube is cut off with a jeweler's saw and filed flat. The tube provides a pilot hole to drill with #61 hole and then tapped for 00-90 Brass Build 1962 Jaguar XKE Roadster bolts.

    Brass Build 1962 Jaguar XKE Roadster-xke-engine-033-jpg

    Here all the bolt bosses are in place and filed flat as needed and threaded for 00-90 Brass Build 1962 Jaguar XKE Roadster bolts. The top three holes are for the generator mounting bracket and the lower three are for the engine mount.

    Brass Build 1962 Jaguar XKE Roadster-xke-engine-034-jpg

    Next the freeze plugs; and more bosses for the right side of the engine.

    Ken
    QUOTE QUOTE #30

  15. ScaleMotorcars's Avatar Administrator
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    Daniel
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    In your last photo above I still don't see how you can solder that bolt boss to the block without effecting the one directly next to it.

    How do you isolate the heat that much??? Also the block is very thin and the boss very thick. I would imagine you heat the boss with the soldering iron and the heat transfers to the block but whenever I try that it takes forever and usually ends in a cold joint.
    QUOTE QUOTE #31

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