Close

Page 3 of 7 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 LastLast
Results 31 to 45 of 99
    1. Kit: , by (VIP/Sponsor) harrypri is offline
      Builder Last Online: Jun 2016 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/8 Rating:  (1 votes - 5.00 average) Thanks: 1
      Started: 08-20-07 Build Revisions: Never  
      Not Supported

      I started this model a long time ago, but got sidetracked when the Big Deuce and Big T were reissued. I built my highboy deuce and [B][I]two[/I][/B] Big T hot 1/8 Jag finally coming out of mothballs! rods...then the Pocher bug bit and I just [B][I]had[/I][/B] to build my Alfa.

      Well, the Alfa is 99% finished, so I dug the old Jag out of storage. It's the 1976 release of the model, molded in bright yellow (the original issue was molded in red). It wil now become my "active" project...(at least until something else comes along and sidetracks me again!)

      I'm doing a replica of a very early car...one of the first several hundred built, with the external bonnet latches and the road draft tube (which was removed early in the production run). I have several loose wires and hoses to connect yet, as you can see, but the engine is just about finished.








      1/8 Jag finally coming out of mothballs!
      Show Complete First Post

      Show Your Support

      • This build may not be copied, reproduced or published elsewhere without author's permission.
        Please note: The first post will be displayed at the top of every page.
    JOIN THE SMC ALLIANCE NOW

  1. ScaleMotorcars's Avatar Administrator
    Name
    Daniel
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    2,969
    I completely agree. Ive gotten many requests to offer these parts and they are on my to do list as well as a more detailed interior parts and a photo-etched console.

    Harrypie.
    IF you don't mind could you post more photos of your added engine details as well as chassis does and don't. I'm sure it could be put together as a tutorial and help out others. Not asking for a 20 page how to just some key points you noticed along the way and your remedies for them.

    Thanks....
    QUOTE QUOTE #32

  2. harrypri's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Harry
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    377
    I'll see what I can do. Unfortunately I didn't take photos of the engine prior to the shots I've posted, but I'll go back tonight and get some detail shots...along with an explanation of what and why.
    I'll post up some more info tomorrow morning.


    1/8 Jag finally coming out of mothballs!
    QUOTE QUOTE #33

  3. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Jeffrey
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    7,826
    Oh yeah, that would be great. We all could learn so much from a tutorial like that.

    It's a funny thing and I know we've mentioned it before but it's still worth repeating. Once you start to superdetail models, there is really no going back. That's why it's so difficult to build an out of the box stock 1/8 Jag finally coming out of mothballs! build. You see things and you know you can fix them. It tugs on you like a hook in your skin. You just can't leave it alone. That's why my box stock 1/8 Jag finally coming out of mothballs! tutorial stopped being box stock 1/8 Jag finally coming out of mothballs! and I started to add the corrections. Before I know it, I'm throwing out parts or giving them away and reaching for the sheet and stick styrene 1/8 Jag finally coming out of mothballs! . And to add insult to injury, if I'm in the middle of building a part like the timing chain cover and water pump cover on my scratchbuilt engine, if I come across a picture that shows better detail and I can't fix the mod, it's in the garbage with the part and I start a new one. It's not a choice, it's a dang compulsion. I've heard, "don't worry, no one will ever see it". I just know it's there and it makes me feel creepy.

    We've all caught this disease and it's a running epidemic.
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #34

  4. ScaleMotorcars's Avatar Administrator
    Name
    Daniel
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    2,969
    Thanks. A few pics pointing out what you learned would be perfect. That kind of stuff really helps out.
    QUOTE QUOTE #35

  5. harrypri's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Harry
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    377
    As requested...a little more detail on what I've done so far.

    Basically I don't use any aftermarket detail parts. Nothing against the aftermarket guys...the parts and detailing extras that they make are amazing, but personally I prefer to scratch-build my details. I get more satisfaction out of making my own parts out of "found materials" and basic scratchbuilding materials rather than buying the part that someone else made. Just my personal "way", I guess.

    The only reason I bring that up is because you'll see in the following photos that my added work isn't perfect by any means. I don't have the tools to be able to mill my own aluminum parts, for example. I do it all with a very basic set of tools...razor saw, x-acto, files and sandpaper. Pretty much a "low-tech" operation!

    Anyway...on with the show.

    The model itself goes together very well...even though it was originally tooled way back when. There is almost no flash 1/8 Jag finally coming out of mothballs! , and virtually everything fits as it's supposed to. It's kind of nice to be able to build a kit without re-engineering the whole darn thing! The biggest shortcoming of this kit is the lack of some details, several of which are very obvious by their absence.

    I used a couple of Jaguar restoration books as references. I didn't try to add every last linkage, coupling and fitting...that would be impossible. I try to add enough detail to make the model look real, without going super-detail crazy. And since I don't enter contests, I don't have to worry about that aspect of things.

    In this first photo you can just barely see the scratch-built cooling fan, which I cut out of a pie tin! I find the aluminum in those tins to be just the right thickness to work with...stiff enough to hold it's shape yet thin enough to easily cut with an x-acto or scissors. Those throw-away aluminum turkey roasting pans that you can get at the supermarket are also good sources for this type of thin aluminum sheet. One turkey pan has enough material in it to last for years of detailing models.



    The rubber radiator hose material that comes in the kit is much too stiff and thick...the tight bend you see in the photo causes the hose to push against the expansion tank and actually twist it out of alignment...so I made my own hoses by bending a length of sprue 1/8 Jag finally coming out of mothballs! over a candle flame. That way the bend in the hose is permanent and not causing stress on adjoining parts. The hose clamps are strips of the aforementioned pie tin material, and the screw part of the clamp is a length of straight pin inside some wire insulation, superglued to the aluminum strip and painted silver. It's not as detailed as a PE part, but it does the job for me.
    ------------------------------

    Here you can see the battery and heater box. The "Lucas" label on the battery was scanned out of one of my Jaguar books, printed to scale size and applied to the battery with clear enamel 1/8 Jag finally coming out of mothballs! . The battery caps are simply short lengths of white sprue 1/8 Jag finally coming out of mothballs! , and the cable connectors (which look very much like the real car's) are little fittings that I found in the jewelry making aisle of Hobby Lobby...a great source of all kinds of little fittings, chain, wire, etc. A little imagination can turn those items into all sorts of automotive details!



    The intake on the heater box was cut out of the kit part and replaced by a piece of K&S 1/8 Jag finally coming out of mothballs! PE brass material. The linkage on the side is scratchbuilt out of my good old pie tin aluminum, a coil of wire for a spring and a few straight pins.
    -------------------------------

    Next up...the carb linkage. Early Series I cars had a very complex linkage with many redundant adjustments. The kit parts do a pretty good job of replicating this linkage, but there are no actual connections to the carbs themselves! Likewise there is no connection from the linkage back to the firewall (and ultimately to the gas pedal). The intake tubes from the air plenum to the carbs were replaced with aluminum tubing.


    ----------------------------------

    Here's a better view of my scratch-built throttle (and brake) linkages...using the usual assortment of straight pins, wire insulation, etc. Strangely enough, the kit does include the firewall-mounted linkage arm molded in, but no parts are supplied to connect the linkage to the carbs!


    -----------------------------------

    Here's a closer view of the actual linkage to the carbs...lengths of paper clip and small pieces cut out of sheet aluminum. (Very high-tech, huh???)


    ----------------------------------
    Here's a shot of the distributor wiring. The wire looms are small circles cut out of sheet styrene 1/8 Jag finally coming out of mothballs! with six holes drilled to run the wires through. I tried to keep the wires tightly packed and close to the engine, because there's very little clearance between the top of the engine and the underside of the hood...I didn't want the ignition wires to interfere with the hood closing. The coil mounting strap is cut out of a sheet of black coated aluminum, which I got from inside a broken old VCR! There is a gold mine of detailing bits and pieces inside old electronic equipment!!! You can also see the fuel lines here, which are made of paper clip wire, with fittings made of wire insulation painted silver.



    You can also see another of the radiator "sprue hoses" with the homemade clamps, and you can get a glimpse of the cooling fan blades. Also, one of the rubber bellows on the scratch-built tie rod assembly is visible. That "rubber" part is actually made by winding a length of solder around an appropriate diameter (paint brush handle or whatever...), then I "painted" the solder coil with CA glue 1/8 Jag finally coming out of mothballs! to keep things in position. After that I "painted" it again with white glue, which "connects" the individual ribs and makes it look like one piece of corrugated rubber rather than a coil of solder. Painted flat black, it looks pretty much like the real thing...and you'd never know what it was actually made of!
    -------------------------------------

    In this picture you can see the "Lucas Screen Jet" label on the windshield washer reservoir and the data plate behind the front wheel. Both of these were scanned out of a book, printed to size and attached with clear enamel 1/8 Jag finally coming out of mothballs! ...same way as the "Lucas" label on the battery.


    ----------------------------------------

    Finally, another shot of the engine. The valley cover is one molded piece, but a lot of detail can be added simply by painting. I sprayed the part gold, per my reference photos, and picked out the spark plugs and mounting nuts with Testor's silver.


    --------------------------------------

    So...what have we learned here? Simple...you can do a lot with a little. All of the details that I added were made of the simplest materials, much of which are free! Add some painted detailing, and the overall effect can be very convincing.


    1/8 Jag finally coming out of mothballs!
    Last edited by harrypri; 08-28-07 at 11:12 AM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #36

  6. robjos32's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    robert
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    697
    Harrypri. The jag is looking awesome. I can't wait to see what color you decide to paint the car.
    You can have any color you want, as long as it's black. Henry Ford
    QUOTE QUOTE #37

  7. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Jeffrey
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    7,826
    Great tutorial Harry. This is exactly the kind of thing we need. Although all the equipment we speak about like the lathes and the mills help produce exceptional models, they're are generally out of reach by the average modeler in the street. They definitely do what they're supposed to, but if you can't get one, does that mean you'll never be able to make great models? I think that question has been effectively answered by this posting with a resounding no. Beautiful and high quality models can be built provided the artist knows how to handle his or her materials and I think Harry has demonstrated that clearly. Since most of us are unable to get the lathes, etc, we need as many low tech tutorials we can get. Thanks Harry, keep 'em comin'
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #38

  8. harrypri's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Harry
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    377
    Quote Originally Posted by robjos32 View Post
    Harrypri. The jag is looking awesome. I can't wait to see what color you decide to paint the car.
    You already see it. It's a medium metallic 1/8 Jag finally coming out of mothballs! blue from Duplicolor (I don't remember what car it's actually for, but it's definitely NOT a 1961 E-Type factory correct color...but that's ok...it's [I][B]MY[/B][/I] car!!!


    1/8 Jag finally coming out of mothballs!
    QUOTE QUOTE #39

  9. harrypri's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Harry
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    377
    Oh...one more thing I forgot to mention.

    Tiny nuts and bolts are available from various sources, and obviously they would look very realistic when used on a model...because they [I][B]ARE[/B][/I] real, only smaller.

    But they're also very expensive. In my cheapness I used some Evergreen hexagonal styrene 1/8 Jag finally coming out of mothballs! rod. I simply cut off pieces of it with my razor saw and my handy-dandy little aluminum miter box. Presto! Instant scale bolt heads! I used these all over the model. Some of the smaller "screwheads" (like on the heater box and on the straps that connect the expansion tank to the top of the radiator, for example) are simply plain old straight pins. Can't get any easier than that!

    You really don't have to spend a ton of money on detail parts in order to produce a pretty nice model.

    Besides, I need to save all my pennies for my next Pocher!


    1/8 Jag finally coming out of mothballs!
    QUOTE QUOTE #40

  10. harrypri's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Harry
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    377
    One last thing while in the "tutorial" mode...

    In the last photo you can see what looks like a pretty rough looking seam between two of the blue "sheet metal" panels. Believe it or not, that's intentional!

    I know it seems counter-intuitive to leave some seams rough looking, but the real cars-especially the very early ones-were actually a little "rough around the edges". The underhood structure's seams were especially sloppy looking due to a sort of caulk they used between joints, and in general the underhood area of unrestored examples is of somewhat less than "concours" quality, if you know what I mean...as opposed to some over-restored examples that are far cleaner and pristine that a real one rolling out of the factory ever was!


    1/8 Jag finally coming out of mothballs!
    QUOTE QUOTE #41

  11. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Jeffrey
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    7,826
    British Leyland was not too quality conscious back then. My cousin had an XKE as well as a good friend of mine. (I of course had zilch) Both cars were in the shop constantly for things like broken speedometers, non-working headlights, dead batteries, catching on fire, carburetor problems, fuel line problems, clutch problems, and a few other things I don't remember. When Harry says they're a liitle rough around the edges, I can attest to that first hand. My friend sold his Jag for a Volvo. My cousin traded his in for a brand new 65 GTO and that became a problem because it was stolen twice, for good the second time. I loved that car.
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #42

  12. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Jeffrey
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    7,826
    Harry, I just had a great idea for when the pin heads are a bit too big. Chuck one into the Dremel 1/8 Jag finally coming out of mothballs! and recontour it smaller with a file. Round off the top, carefully cut a slot and you have beautiful screws. I also use the hexagonal styrene 1/8 Jag finally coming out of mothballs! rods. If you want some shiny small bolt heads, you can always cover them with a little BMF 1/8 Jag finally coming out of mothballs! and they'll look pretty good. If you haven't got any BMF 1/8 Jag finally coming out of mothballs! , leave the styrene 1/8 Jag finally coming out of mothballs! painted the same color as the engine like it usually is. If you hadn't have mentioned the pins, I wouldn't have even thought of this.
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #43

  13. harrypri's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Harry
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    377
    Quote Originally Posted by hot ford coupe View Post
    Harry, I just had a great idea for when the pin heads are a bit too big. Chuck one into the Dremel 1/8 Jag finally coming out of mothballs! and recontour it smaller with a file. Round off the top, carefully cut a slot and you have beautiful screws. I also use the hexagonal styrene 1/8 Jag finally coming out of mothballs! rods. If you want some shiny small bolt heads, you can always cover them with a little BMF 1/8 Jag finally coming out of mothballs! and they'll look pretty good. If you haven't got any BMF 1/8 Jag finally coming out of mothballs! , leave the styrene 1/8 Jag finally coming out of mothballs! painted the same color as the engine like it usually is. If you hadn't have mentioned the pins, I wouldn't have even thought of this.

    I don't think ever I'll get to the point where I cut slots in pin heads to simulate screw heads...[B][I]WAAAY[/I][/B] too intricate for me! I don't have that much dedication! The pinhead alone "suggests" a screw head in my world...

    As far as my hex plastic "bolt heads"...you rarely see chromed or shiny bolt heads on street cars, so silver paint is good enough. If you're doing a hot 1/8 Jag finally coming out of mothballs! rod or street rod or some sort of custom, then you might have chromed hardware, but in my Jag's case, nothin' fancy...just what the factory threw together (and apparently several different types of fasteners were used as time went on. It all depended on what they happened to have on hand at the time!)

    In fact, after looking through my Jaguar restoration books, it's amazing just how crude and unrefined those first cars were. At first you couldn't even adjust the seats forward or back. The transmission had no synchro for 1st gear (which must have caused a few embarrassing moments). To open the hood you had to get out and release the latch on each side of the hood with a special little tool they provided! And given their reputation, I assume an owner of one of those cars was under the hood a[I][B] LOT[/B][/I]!


    1/8 Jag finally coming out of mothballs!
    QUOTE QUOTE #44

  14. Don Garrett's Avatar Asst. Administrator
    Name
    Don
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    5,953
    It's all good Harry. I'm with you, if Jeff wants to make screws out of pins, that's cool....but I'll pass. Good way to make yourself cross-eyed. Think I'd grab a drafting pen and draw a line on 'em before I went through that exercise.
    You guys have to try to understand, over the past couple of years HFC has morphed into a micro-detail maniac.
    Grandpa McGurk.....Steppin' Large and Livin' easy.
    TDRinnovations.com
    QUOTE QUOTE #45

  15. harrypri's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Harry
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    377
    Quote Originally Posted by Don Garrett View Post
    You guys have to try to understand, over the past couple of years HFC has morphed into a micro-detail maniac.
    Exactly how small [I][B]IS[/B][/I] he???


    1/8 Jag finally coming out of mothballs!
    QUOTE QUOTE #46

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Quick Scale Calculator

 
Scale Calculator   Scale Factor   Real Size:     + Deluxe Scale Calculator
  1: th   Which equals Convert measurement: Reset or clear:  
  Any Scale   Scale Size:     + Deluxe Metric Calculator
 
Top