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    1. Kit: Tamiya/Scale-Master, by (VIP/Sponsor) ScaleMaster is offline
      Builder Last Online: Jun 2020 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/12 Rating:  Thanks: 1
      Started: 06-02-19 Build Revisions: Never  
      Supported Attribution Scratch Built Build in Progress

      I pulled this kit from my stash on May 5, 2019; the night we got home from the GSL.

      1997 reissue of the 1970 Tamiya Lola T-70 Mk III kit. It's been patiently waiting for 22 years in my stash to be built.
      I've been researching, planning and figuring all month. (Actually I was scheming a couple days before in case I didn't find a dream deal on another Caterham kit during the show/trip.)
      It will be built as a street car T-70 replica with some modern upgrades.


      I started by cleaning up the tub and main body panels.
      Lots of filling and sanding Lola T-70 Mk III to remove the twenty ¼ inch diameter ejection pin marks in the tub alone and general parting lines. But still a nicely molded kit considering its age.


      The insides of the body also needed to be addressed for the same issues.




      Lola T-70 Mk III
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  1. ScaleMaster's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Mark
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    I also made the license plate…



    Lola T-70 Mk III
    Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... - Mark D. Jones
    QUOTE QUOTE #212

  2. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    Very nice, is your DMV open? I need to renew!
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #213

  3. ScaleMaster's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Mark
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    Good question. I don't know. Although I have to register one of our cars this month... Online is the only way I do that stuff now, or go to AAA.
    I keep the ends of the real tags and use them to make the little tags for my model plates. The color matches for sure that way...


    Lola T-70 Mk III
    Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... - Mark D. Jones
    QUOTE QUOTE #214

  4. ScaleMaster's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Mark
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    I designed a Weber 48 IDA carb in SolidWorks. I might have gone a little overkill, but sometimes those details print well. Even though I made the springs and hardware I'll probably print the master without some of those details and machine them in metal like usual.

    Linkages that can barely be seen…

    The screen is a separate part too.

    Idle and mixture screws with springs.



    Lola T-70 Mk III
    Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... - Mark D. Jones
    QUOTE QUOTE #215

  5. ScaleMaster's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Mark
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    Once I knew the base of the manifold fit the engine I added the runners and flanges.



    Lola T-70 Mk III
    Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... - Mark D. Jones
    QUOTE QUOTE #216

  6. Jo NZ's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Jo
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    I see that these are new Webers, made in Spain, and CE marked! Great CAD work.
    QUOTE QUOTE #217

  7. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    Very nice indeed!

    Can you describe your "process"? Do you have access to an actual part to measure? Do you work off of photographs? In making engine components I find gasket sets very helpful, -for shapes and dimensions.

    How long did it take you to attain your level of proficiency? How long to model the carbs, for instance?

    And?

    Once you've got your Virtual Model done, which printing process do you prefer and why?

    "Prepping" those parts for painting? Making molds, (RTV), assembly, and occasional repairs? Which adhesives, primers, and rubber do you recommend?

    And?

    Thanks for sharing! I am around engineers all the time, and I have to assemble, paint, surface and repair rapid prototype parts, but I am no longer working within a department of modelers, -so the opportunity to learn is gone. -Well, that's a little bleak, -the opportunity to compare notes and ideas is gone.

    Just yesterday I was asked to restore a logo that had been lost under too much primer Lola T-70 Mk III , and I am currently scribing Lola T-70 Mk III panel lines, making straight and even, on a large model, FDM, that has been scribed, re-scribed, and primed twice before. -I am unfortunately, at the tail end of the "see if Don can fix it?" part of the equation.

    Too many questions? Sorry! -it's just that I am starved for other informed opinions!

    Again excellent work! -and again, thank you for sharing!
    Last edited by MODEL A MODEL; 06-13-20 at 01:16 PM.
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #218

  8. ScaleMaster's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Mark
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    Thank you Jo! I wanted to be sure not to replicate something like an EMPI or other "off" brand Weber looking carbs. This project is of a modern "replica" of a Lola, not a true vintage T-70.

    Don: I am lucky to have access to all the cores and some parts at a performance shop for the parts I don't have in my own garage. So I often literally create the model with the real part in my lap.
    I've been a professional model maker and graphic designer (Scale-Master Decals) for 40 years, but I only started doing digital 3D modeling a less than 5 years ago. I started using it to design bodies, so this is much easier for me than a body.
    It took me about 30-40 hours to make the 3D carb and manifold from scratch.
    I have an FDM and and SLA printer in my shop. The SLA is the only one that can make these parts.
    Most of the parts I grow from the 3D files I use as masters and make RTV Lola T-70 Mk III molds and cast copies in urethane Lola T-70 Mk III resin Lola T-70 Mk III .
    I get my casting Lola T-70 Mk III supplies from BJB Enterprises because they are local and relatively consistent.
    Tamiya Lola T-70 Mk III paints and primers are a safe bet, but for economical reasons I also use automotive spray can and polyester high fill primers.
    CA is my primary adhesive.

    Let me know if I missed something. And thanks!


    Lola T-70 Mk III
    Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... - Mark D. Jones
    QUOTE QUOTE #219

  9. ScaleMaster's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    First print of the full manifold.


    Test printed the carb parts at the same time. In the end it looks like I'll have to machine hardware for them like usual.


    Although I was half surprised the lower linkage and springs grew…




    Lola T-70 Mk III
    Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... - Mark D. Jones
    QUOTE QUOTE #220

  10. ScaleMaster's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Mark
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    The radius rods in the kit are clunky chromed plastic with C type snap "fittings". And they are somewhat flexible.
    I drew up adjustable rod ends and joints and printed some out. I printed one set assembled together for the rear joints to make mocking it up and sizing the rods easier.
    The main radius rods are steel rod and the receivers for the control links are brass rod.




    Lola T-70 Mk III
    Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... - Mark D. Jones
    QUOTE QUOTE #221

  11. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    A very interesting build to follow! -and of course we know the finish will be excellent! (it always is!)

    For those who are not familiar with the differences between FDM, and SLA, and SLS for that matter, -could you show some of the process involved.

    The FDM are the most affordable systems, working with an extruded filament of ABS, or Urea? SLA has its resin Lola T-70 Mk III bath. And, the sintered variety, can now-a-days be almost anything!

    There are also the printed types, but I've forgotten the abbreviation!

    I have worked with all, but only have access to FDM. -I don't do any of the "Virtual" work, -just the "Actual"

    Don't get me wrong, Computer Modeling is modeling! -it's just that I am a very old dog!
    Last edited by MODEL A MODEL; 06-19-20 at 09:23 PM.
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #222

  12. ScaleMaster's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    I'm actually working on a series of articles about 3D printing for a popular automotive model magazine that will cover all that in detail.
    For me right now the SLA is the best option to make these types of parts for various reasons.


    Lola T-70 Mk III
    Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... - Mark D. Jones
    QUOTE QUOTE #223

  13. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    Oh good! I think the decline in modeling is in part, a shift in interests, many distractions out there, -and a failure of new industries reaching out and educating the "un-informed" of the values and benefits of these new methodologies.

    I have a few friends, who taught themselves the softwares needed, then got into positions where they could apply these skills, and are now fully ensconced in engineering departments, or product development depts., and digital sculpting!

    The new technologies need people. Computer modeling is here to stay, all young, and not so young people interested in manufacturing, transportation, and even medicine, should look into this field.

    (my opinion)
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #224

  14. ScaleMaster's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Mark
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    I agree Don. It's moving forward with or without us.

    While I was able to engineer in the correct angles for the intake manifold to mate to the block and heads when I designed it; the printer left too much slag on the bottom surfaces and I had to fixture it up in my mill to cut those angles for a proper fit. This material is very brittle and I was relieved that it took the vise and milling as well as it did.
    I also added a couple more magnets to it.



    The block received two more magnets too. As well as brass tubing under the thermostat housing and the distributor to positively locate and align the manifold.




    Lola T-70 Mk III
    Build what you want and build it for yourself, the rest will follow... - Mark D. Jones
    QUOTE QUOTE #225

  15. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    Question? What type of end mills do you use, and at I assume, a fast speed? -for SLA I have found Diamond sintered bits, Dremel Lola T-70 Mk III or "Cheap Assortments" to work well.

    And another question / speculation. I too use magnets a lot in my work. But they are never around long enough for me to see if the magnets create their own issues? Attracting dust, filings, ? ? ?

    For extra strength, on very large and somewhat heavy parts, I have used magnets on both parts, and this requires them being properly aligned "Pole-Wise"

    Final question? -are you, were you the originator of SCALE-MASTER decals? - the sets of stripes, and large colored sheets? I was the manager of Paul Freiler's Historical Models, up in Torrance, and sold a great deal of your product back in the 80's and 90's!

    Small world!
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #226

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