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    1. Kit: , by (VIP/Sponsor) xken is offline
      Builder Last Online: Nov 2014 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/8 Rating:  (2 votes - 5.00 average) Thanks: 0
      Started: 10-07-11 Build Revisions: Never  
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      I have all the reference materials including the real car in my garage to build this. This will be a follow on tutorial to the Model T build with a more complicated subject that will take a great deal more time to build. A this point I am not really sure where I will end up but hope to learn more about building cars instead of planes and have a little fun doing it.

      Here is the start of the engine by locating the cylinders. I usually start my builds with the engine which is generally the most difficult and time consuming part of the build. Here I have marked, center punch and starting with a smaller drill bit; drilling the holes. Initially the two sheets were spray glued together to locate the holes, then separated for subsequent drilling.

      I drilled holes progressively larger to one size below the finished size. This was done for both parts of the top and bottom of the block, which are the scribe lines on the sheets.
      I then used a larger ream to very carefully sneak up on a press fit for each cylinder tube. The press fit is critical for holding the parts in space while being soldered. This start will be the foundation of the engine assembly.

      Here the first sheet has been reamed with cylinder walls press fit in place. The engine drawing at 1/8th scale is in the background.

      Here the second sheet has been clamped to the first to be matched. In using a drill press drift and out of round will occur, the ream gets the holes back to round for a press fit. The second sheet once clamped in place need trimming to match and this was accomplished very carefully using a sharp X-acto blade and the first sheet as the pattern to match to. The blade will carve away the brass and work slowly to not only achieve the match but also the press fit.

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  1. Ton's Avatar Super Moderator
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    Ton
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    Mar 2008
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    1,098
    Beautiful car you have got there and a very interesting project!
    Regards

    Ton
    QUOTE QUOTE #2

  2. strevo's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Steve
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    Jun 2008
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    Wow Ken, I can't wait to see this build unfold! I think we're all going to need to take out an insurance policy against drool on our keyboards now!
    "Success and failure are the same choice; only attitude determines the difference." Ross A. Halliday
    QUOTE QUOTE #3

  3. ScaleMotorcars's Avatar Administrator
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    Daniel
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    Good to see you starting a new thread this will be very exciting.

    As for the car, I've seen it in person and its the nicest XKE I've ever seen. Maybe next year when I visit Ken will give me a ride in it. Hint Hint....
    " He who works with his hands is a laborer. He who works with his hands, and his head is a craftsman. He who works with his hands, and his head, and his heart, is An Artist. "- St. Francis of Assisi
    QUOTE QUOTE #4

  4. Beautiful car. Absolutely stunning. And it even seats people larger than 5 ft !



    On Discovery channel the E-Type was elected as most beautiful car in the world, just before the Bugatti Atlantic. Which means that there were almost right... :)
    http://www.bugattibuilder.com
    http://www.bugattiregister.com
    http://www.stolenclassiccarregister.com - Subscribe now and receive notifications when a classic is stolen!
    QUOTE QUOTE #5

  5. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Kenneth
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    Here is a right side view of the engine compartment with the correct carb set up that I hope someday TDR will get around to making. Dan, thanks for the compliment it is a 99.97 point car at Jaguar Concours and in 2000 was awarded Best in Foreign Class at Glenmoor. It will never be a 100 pointer because I drive it too much according to the judges.

    Ken

    QUOTE QUOTE #6

  6. You said brass, ken ?
    (Monogram 1/8 basis...)

    Wonderful project!
    I look forward to see more, as many people I think...
    QUOTE QUOTE #7

  7. 3.Star's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Michael J.
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    Feb 2009
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    Never mind driving the XKE , I'd sell my soul to have one. Looking forward to see another one of your masterpieces,

    Best Regards

    Michael
    Last edited by 3.Star; 10-08-11 at 04:51 AM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #8

  8. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Kenneth
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    Propeller looks great. Yes I have built one of those years ago and have another in the box still. Great appearance model but some of the details could have been done much better.

    3.Star I bought this in 1978 in 17 boxes and assorted sub assemblies but an all original basket case with holes in the body you could put your leg through. The only non original part was the steering wheel which was replaced at one point with a Nardi wheel. All numbers match the original build so I now have a certificate from the Jaguar Heritage Foundation verifying it authenticity and it is registered with them.

    Back then not much of a market for a basket cases so I was able to purchase it for $1,100. What you see is years of work, check writing, two kids through college and the same wife.

    Don't give up the dream!

    Ken
    QUOTE QUOTE #9

  9. Thats a very nice XKE, and I don't think you will have any problems.

    Bill
    QUOTE QUOTE #10

  10. Daniel's Avatar Established Member
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    Daniel
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    Dec 2007
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    Ken, great car you have done a wonderful job with your E-Type restoration. I look forward to your build you have the best reference you can get.
    QUOTE QUOTE #11

  11. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Kenneth
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    Once the cylinder walls were all fitted top and bottom; then the top surface of the block perimeter was sawed using a jeweler's saw to the required perimeter contour.

    Here is a closeup of the head bolt locations first marked with a scribe then drilled with a #55 drill bit then tapped cutting the threads using a 0-80 tap. These are just a couple of bolts screwed in to show the concept. The studs will be cut later which will receive the acorn nuts once the head is in place.

    Here is an overall view just press fit together for now. Before soldering I need to make a duplicate pattern to make the copper head gasket and bottom surface for the head with the stud locations. Again planning ahead is critical when scratch building.

    This shows the matching top and bottom parts true to length. The sides will be soldered to the inside surfaces using 1/32 x 3/4" sheet stock thus keeping top and bottom surfaces parallel to each other.

    Ken
    QUOTE QUOTE #12

  12. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Kenneth
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    Here is the benefit of tight fits, using a very hot iron and little solder the joints were flow soldered completely around each cylinder.

    Here the solder joints have all be cleaned using files and sanding stick. The object in soldering is to use as little solder as possible to get a real strong joint.

    Here two pieces of brass sheet were spray glued together with cutout pattern added for each end of the block. This assures starting with identical parts.

    Here the block ends have been soldered in place. This is the left side view. The bottom flange of the block was the cut out and also soldered in place.

    Here is the right side view. The bottom flange was cut out to provide a flat surface as a guide. Note that it bridges across the locations for the crankshaft, which will be cut away later. The real trick is to keep the bottom flange and the top of the block square and parallel to each other. The flange will be used to now add the side of the block, it will then be thickened to receive the threaded holes for the oil pan.

    Ken
    QUOTE QUOTE #13

  13. Good to see you on another build again Ken. Looking forward to this.

    Mike
    My website:
    http://www.firesteelhobbies.com/index.html

    Feel free to look around. I have all of my projects on the website.
    QUOTE QUOTE #14

  14. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Kenneth
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    With the block bottom flange in place the side walls of the block are cut and fitted. First two angles were soldered in place to form the lower channel. Then the upper side wall was added.
    The curved section was started by annealing a piece of sheet stock and hand formed using a steel wrist pin as a mandrel to get the needed curve.

    Here the curved piece is just press fitted in place. it will not be soldered in place at this point so as to allow access to the interior of the block to solder the support walls for the crankshaft in place.

    This is slow going at this point so as to get good tight fits.

    Ken
    QUOTE QUOTE #15

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