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    1. Kit: , by (VIP/Sponsor) Dr Dave is offline
      Builder Last Online: Sep 2014 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/8 Rating:  Thanks: 0
      Started: 01-25-11 Build Revisions: Never  
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      G’day folks, I never thought I’d be putting anything in this section, the motorcycle department is my favorite. I’m here because I got a little bit “out of control”.

      Let me explain: While browsing at the hobby shop I spotted this tiny kit. Because all my builds take so long to finish I thought I’d just whip up a quick one over the weekend and put it in the “off topic” section as it’s only 1/35 scale. How wrong I was. 2 months later and I’m still not finished. Once I started the build the ideas started flowing, and what was meant to be just a little bike on the shelf became….. well, you’ll see.

      On the way to the hobby shop I stopped to check out a small gathering of custom cars, and there was this beautiful BMW/sidecar. When I saw the kit I thought ‘hey, I was just looking at the real one, I’ll build that!’

      This is where it all began:

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  1. ScaleMotorcars's Avatar Administrator
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    Daniel
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    One of my favorite bikes. I rode an R75-5 BMW for years with a Ural sidecar and machine gun. The Ural was a copy of the original Steib with the only real difference being the lack of a flip up trunk lid. Rather the seat folded forward in the Ural. That was one fin bikes the ladies liked it also.

    I cant wait to see how this turns out.
    " He who works with his hands is a laborer. He who works with his hands, and his head is a craftsman. He who works with his hands, and his head, and his heart, is An Artist. "- St. Francis of Assisi
    QUOTE QUOTE #2

  2. Dr Dave's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    David
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    Dan, the real bike here has the Steib side car with lift up trunk but does not have the driven side car wheel as the model has. Even if you had a pretend gun on the bike here in Oz you'd be locked up straight away

    My intention was to knock up a quick copy of that immaculately restored machine. Didn’t consider using the figures from the kit or doing anything else. Started building and thought it wouldn’t take much just to throw in a couple of quick little details like spark plug leads and brake, clutch and throttle cables.

    The kit itself wasn’t too bad but not quite as good as I had expected. A lot of flashing to clean up on the spokes and I was not going to hand spoke those tiny wheels. The side car needed some work to cover up the join of the 2 halves. Hmm, more time consuming clean up of other parts.

    The weekend was over and I still had bits everywhere, and there are not many bits in it, so I thought that’s all right I’ll finish it off next weekend. Well, that’s when the snowball affect began. During the week while at work driving, the whole thing kept rolling around in my head. Stuff like- the head light needs to be changed from the slotted lens cover to a proper clear lens; a few splinters of wood for the floor boards in the side car; maybe a thin strip of Bare Metal Foil chrome around the head light, tail light and side car marker light…..etc..etc...
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  3. ScaleMotorcars's Avatar Administrator
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    At the time I liked to live dangerously. I got pulled over twice but both cops just wanted to check out the bike. The gun was obviously a prop so it never was a problem.

    Mine had the outer drive wheel but I took out the driveshaft. I never liked the way it rode with that outer wheel under power. And for those that dont know, yes-driveshaft. These were shaft driven both to the rear wheel and again to the outer wheel. What a nightmare swapping out the seals was.

    Ok enough chit chat, back to the build....
    " He who works with his hands is a laborer. He who works with his hands, and his head is a craftsman. He who works with his hands, and his head, and his heart, is An Artist. "- St. Francis of Assisi
    QUOTE QUOTE #4

  4. Dr Dave's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    David
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    I glued a few parts together and started applying some gloss black enamel with a brush. On small areas the enamel comes up very shiny straight off the brush. I decided to replace the molded plastic seat spring with a proper spring, it looks so much better, easy and quick. Just wrap some black coated wire around a drill bit the right size, trim to the required length and glue in place.

    I guess I could have made this a quick build if I really tried hard, but I'm sure a lot of you know how one thing leads to another and before you know it you've done more than planed and a whole lot of time has passed by.
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  5. Dr Dave's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Now the front end goes together. Gloss black on the head light and bracket, fender, rim and spokes. Satin black on the fork protectors and tyre, and silver on the lower forks. For the head light lens I had a little dig through my spare truck lights box and found a suitable spot light lens to replace the black-out light cover. A small strip of Bare Metal Foil around the lens worked well for the chrome surround. The four amber lenses next to the handlebars are roof marker lights from a 1/25 scale Kenworth and will be reduced in size to be used for turn indicators.

    Two coats of gloss black on the side car, frame, wheel and fender, and some Bare Metal Foil on the leaf springs. Crikey, there's a lot of black there now. At this stage I have to be careful not to touch anything painted as the paint hasn't hardened yet. Also at this stage of the build I've thought about it but haven't yet decided to do a diorama, just the bike.
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  6. Dr Dave's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    I scratch built a new exhaust system to match the real bike as the kit pipes were very different. 1mm stainless wire will do the job nicely (the pipes in the kit are 1mm). One curved bend and trim to the required length had two new pipes done in no time. The mufflers are made from 2.4mm aluminium welding rod cut close to required length, rounded off at both ends and polished up. Then I drilled a 1mm hole in one end for the wire to fit into and cut a slot in the other end for the fish tail outlet to fit into. The fish tails are made from the foil seal found under the lid of a new tin of coffee. (I’m also going to try using this foil for bent and buckled body panels on something else later)

    By now I’ve been having thoughts of a bit of scenery to put the bike on when it’s done, and I’ve also been checking out the three little guys that were trapped in the box until I let them out. I’m thinking that I might use one of them to go with the bike and scenery somehow, but as the bike is being done as a post war job the little fellow will have to swap his German uniform for a civilian outfit.
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  7. Dr Dave's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Now that the quick weekend build has blown out of proportion I might as well spend a bit more time and do something to brighten up the little black bike. A bit of fake grass from the railway section of the hobby store got things started, then I remembered the hand made trees I bought to go with the road train I’ve started to rebuild. These trees are good because there’s not really any particular scale for them, you just use what ever size suits your needs. I found one to suit quite nicely and it goes well with the bike. A patch of grass and a tree ? It’s ok but it needs something more. After throwing around all sorts of ideas for a few days a decision was finally made. The bike will be parked on the grass under a shady tree by a creek in which the ex-soldier is fishing. I carved up a piece of styrofoam for the ground and it seems to work ok.
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  8. Dr Dave's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    This idea was hatched after talking to a few military modeling mates in our local scale model club who told me it wasn’t uncommon for soldiers to pinch a few bike parts here and there and send them back home with the intention of building up a bike when they returned home from the war.

    So the scenario is that this sneaky little soldier did just that. Now that the war is over and he has put together his bike and sidecar, he is enjoying a bit of post war stress relief by going for a lovely ride in the country and doing a spot of fishing.

    I’ve had to amputate a couple of limbs from the other figures and reattach them in a suitable position so the guy can sit on the bank and cast his line out. Also some fashion redesigning now has him in a regular shirt and fishing waders.
    It turns out that he’s an Aussie as he has an Akubra hat and is using the famous Alvey side cast reel on a Jarvis Walker rod. (Just lucky I have all the real stuff in the shed to copy from).

    The hat is made from paper. The rod is made from heated and stretched sprue with fine wire bent into circles. The reel was a challenge, it’s made by turning down a piece of sprue using my small drill as a lathe with thin wire for the handles and stainless wire for the line guide. That coffee tin foil was used for the swivel attachment to the rod. Very fine wire is used for the line with a bit of insulation from inside a wrist watch for the lure.
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  9. Dr Dave's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    The fisherman is ready to go fishing at last. I finished him off a few nights ago. The hardest part was getting him to hold the rod properly. He was unwilling to change his grip until I had a little talk to him to explain the correct technique to cast his line out Now he's got it

    When I had him all painted up he looked a bit too clean so I tried something new for me, but common practice for the military modelers, a wash of 'burnt sienna' oil paint diluted in white spirit so it looks like dirty water and brush it all over. Hey, that stuff works a treat. When it was dry I added a bit more to his sweaty armpits and to the bottom of his boots. A cigy on the lip...a small piece of styrene rounded off and glued into a hole drilled between his lips, and a bit of grey paint on the end with a red tip.
    I think he needs some hair! I very thinly sliced some black wool with my #11 blade to make what looked like black dust. Then I brushed flat clear on the backs of his arms and around the back of his head and sprinkled the black dust on the wet paint, brushing the excess of the arms and adding a bit more up under the hat. That'll do me for for my first figure model.
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  10. Dr Dave's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    More on the bike. I should put those pipes on and see how different they are to the original. Oh yeah, heaps better. I also made a foot brake pedal out of solder, it’s soft enough to bend easily into shape and I could squash the end flat to make the bit where you push with your foot. I then used an old #11 blade with the tip broken off to score some lines into the flat surface for the grip texture. Various bits of wire and styrene make up the linkage. While I was at it I thought I’d go ahead and add some spark plug and coil leads, and throttle cables and fuel lines to the carbies. A few more bits of styrene made a kick starter. Slowly making progress.
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  11. Dr Dave's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Black Beauty is finished at last! All the sub-assemblies went together with no problems. Brake, clutch and throttle cables have been added to the handle bars and wooden flooring in the side car. For the leather look on the seats I used a tin of Humbrol flat tan that would have to be around 30 years old. The paint had settled and separated but not skinned over, and when I stirred it, it started to mix ok but then went a bit lumpy. The lumps gave a nice textured look and a light rub with a bare finger over the dry flat paint gave it just the right amount of dull shine.
    An instrument face and photo etched ring from 1/25 scale car accessories worked perfectly for the speedo on the back of the head light. Overall I think it turned out satisfactory. I'd like to put some white pinstripes on it but don't know how to get it that small. Oops, I forgot the turn indicators, I'll do that later.
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  12. Dr Dave's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Getting closer to the finish line. With the bike done and the fisherman done, there's only a little bit of scenery to go now. Yeah, right. It's a bigger job than I had expected, but a whole lot of fun.
    A few rocks at the edge of the creek for the fish to swim around, and some up on the bank as well. Also some ferns, vines, weeds and grass tufts, and a broken tree branch. The fisherman was supposed to be sitting on the log but all the angles were wrong so I'll be sitting him on a rolled up blanket (cut from an old rag).
    Some things like the tree , grass and other plants have to be artificial. But for stuff like rocks and dirt, why not use the real thing? Real dirt looks so much better than pretend dirt
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  13. Dr Dave's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Now that I've gotten this far and all has gone pretty well, I've just realized that I should have put the boxing around the foam at the beginning before doing any landscaping. Oh well, too late now. What to do to fix this little problem? Why not have the dirt cover everything? It'll be like a big slice of earth cake (or mud cake if it was wet). But then how do I pick it up when the whole thing is covered in dirt? Touching it will knock the dirt off.
    Ah ha! Plonk the whole lot onto a ceramic tile. And that has the added bonus of the weight of the tile to stop it from blowing away if a gust of wind grabs it while sitting on a table. Problem solved
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  14. Dr Dave's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    At last! That quick week end build is finished. Well, almost. Close enough for now until I work out which is the best way to go about adding a bit of water to the scene. That's the only thing needed now to make the model complete. The water should be covering the rocks and up to the little bush at the the edge of the grass. But for now it can sit on the 'finished' shelf until I get back to it later.
    These dioramas are so much fun to build, and since I've not done any before, these small ones are good practice for me leading up to the 'road train in the desert'.
    I hope you guys enjoyed this little project as much as I did.
    Happy modeling everyone,
    Dave.
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