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Daimler 1885 model engine, Replika on a scale approx. 1:3, fully functionally
Goal amount for this year: 518 USD, Received: 295.00 USD (57%)
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Daimler 1885 model engine, Replika on a scale approx. 1:3, fully functionally Daimler 1885 model engine, Replika on a scale approx. 1:3, fully functionally Daimler 1885 model engine, Replika on a scale approx. 1:3, fully functionally Daimler 1885 model engine, Replika on a scale approx. 1:3, fully functionally Daimler 1885 model engine, Replika on a scale approx. 1:3, fully functionally
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    1. Kit: , by (Established Member) Bender_13 is offline
      Builder Last Online: Jan 2016 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/8 Rating:  Thanks: 1
      Started: 11-18-12 Build Revisions: Never  
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      Hello


      I have times interesting project in attacked taken.

      Daimler 1885 model engine, Replika on a scale approx. 1:3




      (Picture from the original engine Mercedes the Benz museum in Stuttgart)

      “The original, called “the Standuhr”, was one of the first engines built by God-dear Daimler. It was used as drive of the “gasoline-driven engine carriage” and a boat. It was the first “high-speed” combustion engine. At that time approx. 700 rpm were meant.

      Particularly interesting is also the controlling of the exhaust valve. This takes place via a cam disc, whereby a slide ring in a slot of the crankshaft operates the valve via a bumper. Functions also in the model perfectly. “

      Technical data of the model:
      Height of the engine: 320mm,
      Flywheel diameter: 95mm, drilling 20mm

      Manufacturer: classic engine
      Yardstick: 1:3
      Price approx.: 259€ (cast part-corrode 11 parts + accessory kit 4 parts)

      Additional material necessarily e.g.: Brass round material, brass tubes, screws etc. (not in cast part-corrode contained).
      The 15 parts from cast part-corrode must all still be worked on, additionally must still 69 further individual parts be made.
      On the basis the plans provided, for a model construction amateur, with experiences in the rotation and milling, no problem should represent.
      A CD with photos to the individual sections can be acquired additionally.

      Interesting, full-functional model engine from aluminum casting Daimler 1885 model engine, Replika on a scale approx. 1:3, fully functionally , iron and brass. Presupposed one has entrance to a turning lathe and a milling machine.

      First I show you the individual parts like I it from Modelengines, castin kits received. On the side can see to her also a video of the running engine.



      Crank case (exterior)



      Crank case (inside)


      Steering box, wheel, cylinder head




      Crankcheek 2x


      Control disk, bush, piston


      Piston rod, crank handle, piston ring, O-ring, control segment



      When have I the crank case inside turned off first, afterwards have I a wave by the central hole put and bolts. Subsequently, I aligned and pinned the two halves. to the conclusion I could bore the holes for the screws.










      Jens
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  1. Bender_13's Avatar Established Member
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    Jens
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    May 2009
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    Hello


    I found two interesante videos of the riding car. There a similar engine is inserted.








    And a video of the current model engine, of the manufacturer of the Casting Daimler 1885 model engine, Replika on a scale approx. 1:3, fully functionally Kit. I hope my model run to end just as well.





    Jens


    Daimler 1885 model engine, Replika on a scale approx. 1:3, fully functionally
    Last edited by Bender_13; 11-19-12 at 12:14 PM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #2

  2. Bender_13's Avatar Established Member
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    Jens
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    Hello

    The week I milled off the two spaces occupied as the first down at the crank case.


    Afterwards I could screw a foot on me for the further work procedures the possibility gave the engine in the vice to stretch.


    So I could mill the surface above and the groove. The brass screws with which I the halves together screwed have a M2,5 thread)


    And I already into shape-milled the steering box (aluminum casting Daimler 1885 model engine, Replika on a scale approx. 1:3, fully functionally ). (Overall length of the part: 45mm)
    The small part right is a “Stösel” in the steering box is later blocked. That I milled from steel, a M2 thread and the hole for the dowel pin clean-bored.





    Jens


    Daimler 1885 model engine, Replika on a scale approx. 1:3, fully functionally
    QUOTE QUOTE #3

  3. 3.Star's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Michael J.
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    Feb 2009
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    Hi Jens,
    a wonderful piece of historic engineering. Will watch you bringing it together and I plant the seed of a scratch-built "Reitwagen" in your mind. Nevertheless your Model T is gathering dust on the bench, don't even dare to forget it.
    Cheers
    Michael
    QUOTE QUOTE #4

  4. Bender_13's Avatar Established Member
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    Jens
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    Hello

    First I turned four camps. (The outside diameter of the camps is 0.03 mm more largely than the holes in the housing)


    I could press the camps now into the housing.
    Ever two for the exterior of the two housing halves and two for insides.






    Subsequently, I have the camps inside polished to the turned waves to run cleanly so long.




    As the latter for today I milled still two holes into the housing.
    Into the smaller hole (12mm) later still the crankshaft exhaust comes and into the large (diameter 24mm) the bush is fit in.





    Jens


    Daimler 1885 model engine, Replika on a scale approx. 1:3, fully functionally
    QUOTE QUOTE #5

  5. Bender_13's Avatar Established Member
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    Jens
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    Hello

    The next three construction units in as-delivered condition:
    Two crank cheeks


    Control disk


    Into the first crank cheek I bored a few holes after design.


    With second I have additionally the control disk, in which correct position presented and the holes for the threads with marks hole grains.
    Now I could clean-bore also the nine M3 and a M2,5.

    Additionally I already pressed the waves into the disks.

    The waves became secured on the back with a set-screw.


    Now I had to make still another washer.


    Next I lowered the holes in the control disk.


    To the conclusion I had to only rip the bars out in the control disk.


    More for the function of the individual parts when assembling in the next building report.


    Jens


    Daimler 1885 model engine, Replika on a scale approx. 1:3, fully functionally
    QUOTE QUOTE #6

  6. Bender_13's Avatar Established Member
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    Jens
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    Hello


    Now the stroke tap and two M6 screws were only missing.


    I have the stroke tap put into the one crankcheek…


    … bolts and from the other side. On the stroke taps the piston rod is attached later, which moves the piston highly and down.


    Then I could attach 0.5 mm the sheet metal.


    And now I could screw on it the control disks.


    If the building group turns later in the crank case, a Sliding block (red arrow) runs off on and in the groove.
    The Sliding block opens and closes later over a bumper the exhaust valve.
    The next pictures are to clarify you like the Sliding block in the groove run.








    To the conclusion I screwed on still the second crankcheek.








    Jens


    Daimler 1885 model engine, Replika on a scale approx. 1:3, fully functionally
    QUOTE QUOTE #7

  7. Bender_13's Avatar Established Member
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    Jens
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    Hello

    Today I show you the piston rod.
    (As-delivered condition)


    First I have two camps turned which I afterwards into the piston rod pressed. Additionally I need still two disks (thickness 0,2mm).


    Now I could attach the parts on the stroke taps. First a disk.


    Then the piston rod and the second disk attach. And to the conclusion I could screw the second crankcheek on.








    Jens


    Daimler 1885 model engine, Replika on a scale approx. 1:3, fully functionally
    Last edited by Bender_13; 12-02-12 at 01:06 PM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #8

  8. Andym's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Andy
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    Outstanding work. What kind of mill are you using to build something this large?Your work is wonderful. Andy.
    When I was young I used to say "When I grow up I'm going to be somebody!"

    I now realize I should have been more specific.
    QUOTE QUOTE #9

  9. Bender_13's Avatar Established Member
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    Jens
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    Hello Andym

    Quote Originally Posted by Andym View Post
    Outstanding work. What kind of mill are you using to build something this large?Your work is wonderful. Andy.

    I can turn and mill the large parts after end of workday in my work.
    At home I have only a small turning lathe.


    Jens


    Daimler 1885 model engine, Replika on a scale approx. 1:3, fully functionally
    QUOTE QUOTE #10

  10. gbritnell's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    George
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    Great work Jens,
    Being a machinist myself I can appreciate the level of work you're doing on the engine. A company that I did some work for sells the castings for this engine and the others that are listed on the website. They are some very interesting engines.
    gbritnell
    QUOTE QUOTE #11

  11. Bender_13's Avatar Established Member
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    Jens
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    Hello


    The steering box property I already a few weeks ago milled and bored.
    Additionally I prepared still another brass socket and a 2mm wave with M2 now.


    I pressed the socket into the housing. The wave is led by the socket.


    The tappet could be put now into the groove and the wave could then into the tappet be screwed.




    Next I screwed the steering box on the crank case.


    On the pin in the tappet later the Sliding block fastens in then in the groove the crankcheek runs and thus highly and down moved the wave.



    Jens


    Daimler 1885 model engine, Replika on a scale approx. 1:3, fully functionally
    QUOTE QUOTE #12

  12. Bender_13's Avatar Established Member
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    Jens
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    Hello


    The Sliding block was already in cast part-corrodes received. In addition I had to turn still the slip piece from brass.


    Then I could solder both parts together.



    I could be the construction unit now on the pin in the piston rod. There the Sliding block is turning stored and can so the groove in the control disk follow.






    With the crankshaft into the crank case must one puts in on it respects that now the Sliding block in the groove sits.







    The next building group with which I concern itself is the crankshaft exhaust.
    The construction unit provides for it the oil of which at the crankcheeks by the centrifugal energy at the insides of the housing squirts, by the ventilation hole outward squirt cannot.


    As the first I have a part turned…


    … and filed.


    Then still three far parts were missing.


    And I could solder the building group together.




    By in-filed lamellas in the lower one part the pipe can air escape now, but no oil.





    Jens


    Daimler 1885 model engine, Replika on a scale approx. 1:3, fully functionally
    QUOTE QUOTE #13

  13. Egon's Avatar Moderator
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    egon
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    Nice work Jens.
    Are you sure the solder will hold the sliding blok in its place.
    QUOTE QUOTE #14

  14. Bender_13's Avatar Established Member
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    Jens
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    Hallo Egon

    Quote Originally Posted by Egon View Post
    Nice work Jens.
    Are you sure the solder will hold the sliding blok in its place.


    The load at the soldered connection might not be large too.
    I want to let the engine run only 1-2 times, for a few minutes. It will already hold so long. Possibly I screw still two screws purely on the back.



    Jens


    Daimler 1885 model engine, Replika on a scale approx. 1:3, fully functionally
    QUOTE QUOTE #15

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