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    1. Kit: , by (VIP/Sponsor) gbritnell is offline
      Builder Last Online: Mar 2020 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/8 Rating:  Thanks: 0
      Started: 03-22-11 Build Revisions: Never  
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      While planning for this winter's project I had several ideas in mind. Last winter was the V-twin so this year although I had several other engines in mind I wanted something a little different.
      I had been over to my son's house and while helping him in the garage I noticed a T-5 transmission laying over in the corner. The T-5 is a 5 speed manual transmission built by Borg-Warner and used in a variety of vehicles, not the least of which is the Ford Mustang.
      Now I already have the 302 engine so why not build a working trans for it?
      The first step or should I say the first of many steps was to clean and disassemble the trans. Next up was to sketch and measure all of the parts (reverse engineering at it's finest.) With that done, or at least thinking it was done I started Cad drawings of the whole affair. I ended up with around 14 sheets in 8-1/2x11 format. I could have done them larger but that's the size of my printer. I could have PDF'd them and taken them to the local copy store but I have found from past projects that there's always many dimensions missing and details that need correcting when the build starts.
      The drawings were still in progress when the first chunk of aluminum was started. This was to be the main case.
      As with any machining project that entails complex shapes a plan of attack needs to be formulated so there's always something to clamp on to.
      All of the holes were put in first, main shaft, countershaft, drain hole, shift shaft hole etc. Then came the digging out of the inside. The hardest part was making the long cuts with ball end mills. They really like to dig in so you have to watch the cutting direction at all times.
      Both sides were done next while leaving the bottom area square . That way I could clamp from front to rear or top to bottom to set up angular surfaces for machining. The last machining was the bottom.
      For developing radii on the many shapes I have become quite proficient at what I learned in patternmaking. That is referred to as sine and cosinining or mathematically stepping over and down to form the desired radius. Some radii can be produced on a rotary table but the setup time in some cases makes it easier to do it the other way.
      With Cad available I just draw the radius that I want, offset the cutter radius and then put my coordinate step in.
      The last part of the process is burring and stoning all the machine marks out then going in with small files, jewelers and rifflers to smooth everything out.
      I think I ended up with around 120 hours on the case.
      George
      I have loaded the pictures to the machining gallery but am unsure how to sequentially add them to my thread. Help!
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  1. gbritnell's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    George
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    QUOTE QUOTE #2

  2. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Kenneth
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    George,

    Great work!!!! I will have to send you my penny to put in the picture for scale. I don't think the average person will appreciate the size you are working at and how challenging this kind of work is.

    Keep it up and I will be watching and learning as you continue to post!

    Ken
    QUOTE QUOTE #3

  3. Andym's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Andy
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    This is un-flippin'-believable! I put a BW T-5 into my 1956 Ford Fairlane Hot T-5 transmission project Rod (1:1 scale) when I built it a few years ago and know that transmission very well and this piece of machining is absolutely top notch!

    Well done my friend.

    Andy.
    When I was young I used to say "When I grow up I'm going to be somebody!"

    I now realize I should have been more specific.
    QUOTE QUOTE #4

  4. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Jeffrey
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    And he did it all with a block of aluminum and a scout knife. Right? Absolutely incredible. This is master grade work.
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #5

  5. ZacsV8's Avatar Member
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    Zac
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    Brilliant work!
    QUOTE QUOTE #6

  6. gbritnell's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    George
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    Next up is the tailshaft housing. The block of aluminum was squared up and layed out for the initial cutting. As is the case the through holes were all put through while there were straight surfaces to set up to. The input side, or front side of the case machining was started by drilling and milling to the appropriate depths from the drawings. This first sequence of pictures shows these initial steps.
    George







    QUOTE QUOTE #7

  7. gbritnell's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    George
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    As I stated in the intro, you have to think a long way ahead so that you don't end up with no clamping or fixturing points. Even with the complex curves, ribs and shapes on these parts you can cut them away while leaving something to hold. This part had a lot of metal to remove from the bottom side so I wanted to cut it first.
    George







    QUOTE QUOTE #8

  8. gbritnell's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    With the bottom roughed out the curved shapes were developed. The usual process of stepping of the shapes is required because without CNC equipment there's virtually no other way of creating these contours.
    George







    QUOTE QUOTE #9

  9. gbritnell's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    George
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    With the majority of the heavy stock removed the two clamping pieces were machined from the top area of the case so that the upper detailing could start. The contour around the shift shaft housing was started. It is a conical shape on the outside so the first thing I did was step off the major diameter followed by tilting the housing and cutting the same radius but at the required angle. It didn't give me a true cone but with the blending of the shapes under the tube it wouldn't be discernible.
    George

    QUOTE QUOTE #10

  10. gbritnell's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    George
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    The next operation was to start profiling the ribbing and other shapes on the sides of the case. The part was blued up with a marker and layout lines were scribed to give an approximated cutting limit. When cutting the detail into the case most of the shapes are developed by cutting to a known dimension. After the part is set up and squared in the vise 2 edges are picked up and the digital readout is zeroed. From that point the layout lines just give a visual stopping point but a true dimension is always worked to.
    George







    QUOTE QUOTE #11

  11. gbritnell's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    George
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    This is what it looked like with all the machining done. The next steps are to go in with small burrs and slowly blend machined shapes together. I use a Dremel T-5 transmission project grinder with a flexible shaft. It doesn't work as well as a pencil air grinder but they take so much air to run that a large compressor is needed. You learn to let the burrs do the cutting. If you force them they will grab and take off metal where you don't want to. After the burrs have done their job the finishing work is accomplished with files and stones. This is a lengthy process but short of CNC'ing it's the only way to accomplish this type of work. The last photo in this set shows the 2 cases bolted together to give an idea of the size. And it looks really cool at this point!
    George



    QUOTE QUOTE #12

  12. Egon's Avatar Moderator
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    That is some beautiful thing you made there, and manually made, well done. Have you plan to make the gears to and fully working model.
    QUOTE QUOTE #13

  13. gbritnell's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    George
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    Yes it will be a functioning gearbox. The full sized one has helical gears, while doable they would be a huge amount of work for the home shop. To get close to the original gear ratios and still maintain the proper spacing from the mainshaft to countershaft I had to make up 3 different gear cutters, non of which are a standard D.P. I am working on the cover plate at the moment. I'm trying to fit it in between other jobs.
    George
    QUOTE QUOTE #14

  14. Egon's Avatar Moderator
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    egon
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    What's the scale, 1/6 ? Looking forward to see the progress.
    QUOTE QUOTE #15

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