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T-5 transmission project
Goal amount for this year: 518 USD, Received: 415.00 USD (80%)
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T-5 transmission project T-5 transmission project T-5 transmission project T-5 transmission project T-5 transmission project
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    1. Kit: , by (VIP/Sponsor) gbritnell is offline
      Builder Last Online: Jan 2019 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/8 Rating:  Thanks: 0
      Started: 03-22-11 Build Revisions: Never  
      Not Supported

      While planning for this winter's project I had several ideas in mind. Last winter was the V-twin so this year although I had several other engines in mind I wanted something a little different.
      I had been over to my son's house and while helping him in the garage I noticed a T-5 transmission laying over in the corner. The T-5 is a 5 speed manual transmission built by Borg-Warner and used in a variety of vehicles, not the least of which is the Ford Mustang.
      Now I already have the 302 engine so why not build a working trans for it?
      The first step or should I say the first of many steps was to clean and disassemble the trans. Next up was to sketch and measure all of the parts (reverse engineering at it's finest.) With that done, or at least thinking it was done I started Cad drawings of the whole affair. I ended up with around 14 sheets in 8-1/2x11 format. I could have done them larger but that's the size of my printer. I could have PDF'd them and taken them to the local copy store but I have found from past projects that there's always many dimensions missing and details that need correcting when the build starts.
      The drawings were still in progress when the first chunk of aluminum was started. This was to be the main case.
      As with any machining project that entails complex shapes a plan of attack needs to be formulated so there's always something to clamp on to.
      All of the holes were put in first, main shaft, countershaft, drain hole, shift shaft hole etc. Then came the digging out of the inside. The hardest part was making the long cuts with ball end mills. They really like to dig in so you have to watch the cutting direction at all times.
      Both sides were done next while leaving the bottom area square . That way I could clamp from front to rear or top to bottom to set up angular surfaces for machining. The last machining was the bottom.
      For developing radii on the many shapes I have become quite proficient at what I learned in patternmaking. That is referred to as sine and cosinining or mathematically stepping over and down to form the desired radius. Some radii can be produced on a rotary table but the setup time in some cases makes it easier to do it the other way.
      With Cad available I just draw the radius that I want, offset the cutter radius and then put my coordinate step in.
      The last part of the process is burring and stoning all the machine marks out then going in with small files, jewelers and rifflers to smooth everything out.
      I think I ended up with around 120 hours on the case.
      George
      I have loaded the pictures to the machining gallery but am unsure how to sequentially add them to my thread. Help!
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  1. gbritnell's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    George
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    Jul 2006
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    I managed to fit some time in on the transmission. Too many projects! I finished benching out the top cover and the input shaft cover. This takes care of all the sculpting. The remaining pieces, although some are complex, wont' require all the work that went into these casting T-5 transmission project lookalikes. I noticed when I was benching out the cover that I had a thin spot on the front face. Sure enough I had cut too deep in one spot on the inside. What to do? I certainly wasn't going to start over on this piece. I drew up the offending area in CAD and calculated what was needed to put a patch in. I used a .09 slitting saw and made a circular cut into the cover. Once finished I turned up a disk the proper diameter, cut a section out and fitted it in place. Most of it came out great. I was able to lightly peen most of the adjoining surfaces to get an almost invisible patch. The only spot I couldn't peen was on the top surface so there's a small line but I can live with that.
    George



    QUOTE QUOTE #32

  2. gbritnell's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    George
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    The next step was making the shafts and gears. When I first designed the gearbox I knew what I would have to do to make the gears so I made up the cutters at that time. My previous gear making involved using store-bought involute cutters or grinding up small high speed steel lathe bits and using them in a small fly cutter. I had always wanted to try making and using a hob style cutter so this was a good opportunity with so many gears to make. On top of that they are non standard pitches (save one) so they weren't available commercially. The cutters are made from water hardening drill rod (W-1) A lathe tool is ground up with the proper dimensions and then the gashes are put into the drill rod at calculated intervals. This give a 'rack' form to the cutter. When the stock is cut as it rotates this style of cutter forms the involute shape onto the teeth. The first picture is of the cutters. Next is setting up the stock in the dividing head and getting it concentric. Now one of the cutting teeth is lined up with the centerline of the stock with a small surface gauge. This next photo shows the first pass with the cutter and then finally the finished gear.
    George







    QUOTE QUOTE #33

  3. gbritnell's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    George
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    The countershaft had to be made in 2 pieces because the center 2 gears are too close together to cut. This involved a fair amount of time as there were 2 different pitches on the shaft and the plates on the dividing head needed to be changed out after each gear. After the gears were finished the shafts were pressed and Loctited together.
    George





    QUOTE QUOTE #34

  4. gbritnell's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    George
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    When I made the input shaft gear I cut the teeth a little longer so I would have extra stock to make a spare gear to check fits for this particular pitch. You can see by the photo that the mesh is quite good considering the use of a homemade cutter.
    The next photos are of the input shaft with the clutch splining on one end and the pressed on gear on the other.
    George





    QUOTE QUOTE #35

  5. gbritnell's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    George
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    The last installment for today shows the main case with the bearings installed and the mainshaft and countershafts in place.
    George





    QUOTE QUOTE #36

  6. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Kenneth
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    Aug 2008
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    George,

    This is great stuff! You never cease to amaze me with your skills; keep up the great work and posing these great pictures.

    Ken
    QUOTE QUOTE #37

  7. strevo's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Steve
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    Jun 2008
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    George, when you are finished with this project, could you kindly machine me a pan to catch the drool! This is outstanding!
    "Success and failure are the same choice; only attitude determines the difference." Ross A. Halliday
    QUOTE QUOTE #38

  8. Andym's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Andy
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    Sep 2005
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    This is unbelievable!!! I'm absolutely amazed by this.
    Last edited by Andym; 04-26-11 at 09:55 PM.
    When I was young I used to say "When I grow up I'm going to be somebody!"

    I now realize I should have been more specific.
    QUOTE QUOTE #39

  9. Tage's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Daniel
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    Rock on Metal Master!
    QUOTE QUOTE #40

  10. BrassBuilder's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Mike
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    Jan 2007
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    372
    Wow.
    My website:
    http://www.firesteelhobbies.com/index.html

    Feel free to look around. I have all of my projects on the website.
    QUOTE QUOTE #41

  11. gbritnell's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    George
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    I managed to fit in some more build time on the transmission. I finished cutting all the transmission gears. Originally I had planned on making all my own splines and spline bushings for the gears to slide on but it turned out to be a bigger job than I had expected so I opted for of the shelf material.
    When I cut the gears I touched the hob to the blank and set my zero. I then dialed in the total depth of the cut (addendum+dedendum) and cut all the teeth. I started with the countershaft thinking that if any adjustments needed to be made I could more easily do it to the individual gears on the mainshaft. I was very surprised and happy that all the gears meshed quite nicely by going to the proper depth.
    If anyone should contemplate gear making I would recommend using the hob type method. The cutter is relatively easy to make and it will generate the involute curvature on the teeth.
    The first 2 pictures show the reverse idler gear which is a 36 Diametral Pitch gear cut with the hob. The curvature on the teeth can be seen.
    George

    QUOTE QUOTE #42

  12. gbritnell's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    George
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    Next up are several shots of the main case with the complete gearsets installed. The only thing I have to finish up are cutting the key slots in the spline pieces to lock them to the mainshaft.





    QUOTE QUOTE #43

  13. gbritnell's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    George
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    Jul 2006
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    213
    The last pictures show the overdrive gearset which are located inside the tailshaft housing. The first picture show the shifter ring to the left and the second shows it slid onto the splines of the overdrive gear. The shifter forks will locate onto this ring. The final picture is just a closeup of the gearset. These gears on the full sized trans are much finer for quite operation so I made these 48 DP to mimic the originals. As with the gears in the main box these fit perfectly with just one cut.
    George



    QUOTE QUOTE #44

  14. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Kenneth
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    George,

    While I was away visiting with my new grand daughter in California you were really busy and it looks like you got all "geared up" on this project.

    Keep up the great work!

    Ken
    QUOTE QUOTE #45

  15. Egon's Avatar Moderator
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    egon
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    Sep 2009
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    George, it's not fair to post super pro work to us non pro's members, but it looks super fine, now you only need to hook it up to your V8 and perhaps a car to put it in, with a 1/3 live mini man ?
    QUOTE QUOTE #46

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