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    1. Kit: , by (VIP/Sponsor) gbritnell is offline
      Builder Last Online: Nov 2020 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/8 Rating:  Thanks: 0
      Started: 11-07-20 Build Revisions: Never  
      Supported Attribution Scratch Built

      Gentlemen,
      Quite awhile back I presented my flathead (Fordillac) V-8 engine. In looking for a project I thought it would be neat to build a period transmission for it. I had already built a Borg-Warner T-5 for my 302 V-8 engine so I needed another for this engine. Through my son I got introduced to a fellow that's into flatheads and flathead powered vehicles. He offered me a trans to borrow and take measurements from so I took him up on it. I didn't do a full tear down but just far enough to get the dimensions I needed. This information along with the exploded views on the Van Pelt website gave me everything needed to make a set of drawings. The case and covers were machined from 6061 aluminum which is the standard material for most aluminum machining. The shafts were made from drill rod with special home-made cutters made to cut the spines. When I built the T-5 I had just delved into making helical gears and didn't want to 'practice' at that point but for this trans I decided that it was worth the extra effort to make it as close as possible.
      Here's a little back story to making helical gears in the home shop. On one of the model engineering forums that I belong to a fellow came up with a fixture and the calculations for making helical gears. I built the fixture and practiced making gears because the flathead engine required them. The fixture is fairly simple, a block of aluminum that has a reamed hole for a shaft. On one end of the shaft is an adapter for holding the gear blank and on the other end is a helical template and an indexing plate to cut the needed number of teeth. The templates are made from 1/16 brass sheet. A helical gear, like a screw thread, has a lead to it. This means that if you take a point on the screw and follow it around until it comes back to the same longitudinal point it has advanced by X dimension. This is the lead. For a gear with a 45 degree helix this lead will change relative to the diameter of the gear. The larger the gear the farther the lead has to travel to get back to the same point. For each gear being cut, left hand or right hand and varying diameters a template is required so in the case of this transmission 7 templates were required.
      The gears and shift collars slide on splines. These were taken from stock pieces purchased from Stock Drive Products and machined accordingly.
      The main case required quite a few setups to create all the contours and shapes, the hardest of which was the conical bulge that had to meet the existing curved shape of the case. After machining the finish work was done with a Dremel 1953 Ford 3 speed manual transmission flex shaft using mounted stones and riffler files.
      gbritnell

      Build Photos

      1953 Ford 3 speed manual transmission-img_3131-jpg  1953 Ford 3 speed manual transmission-img_3130-jpg  1953 Ford 3 speed manual transmission-img_3129-jpg  1953 Ford 3 speed manual transmission-img_3128-jpg  1953 Ford 3 speed manual transmission-img_3127-jpg  1953 Ford 3 speed manual transmission-img_3127-arrow-jpg  1953 Ford 3 speed manual transmission-img_3126-jpg  1953 Ford 3 speed manual transmission-img_3125-jpg  1953 Ford 3 speed manual transmission-img_3124-jpg  1953 Ford 3 speed manual transmission-img_3123-jpg  1953 Ford 3 speed manual transmission-img_3122-jpg 


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  1. gbritnell's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    George
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    Jul 2006
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    After the transmission was finished it needed a way to shift it. This transmission would have been column shifted in the day. A lot of hot 1953 Ford 3 speed manual transmission -rodders went from the column shifter to a floor shifter. In the 50's-60's there were quite a few companies making their own version of a floor shifter, the most notable being Hurst.
    I asked a car buddy if he happened to have an old shifter in his stash of parts, which he did, so I borrowed it to measure it up and make drawings. After building and assembling it on the trans I realized that the original shift levers on the trans were too long and would allow the shift pin on the shifter to over-travel and pop out of position so new shorter levers were made. I also made a couple of other tweaks that helped the shifting action. It now works great.
    gbritnell1953 Ford 3 speed manual transmission-img_3143-jpg1953 Ford 3 speed manual transmission-img_3142-jpg1953 Ford 3 speed manual transmission-img_3144-jpg1953 Ford 3 speed manual transmission-img_3145-jpg1953 Ford 3 speed manual transmission-img_3146-jpg1953 Ford 3 speed manual transmission-img_3147-jpg


    1953 Ford 3 speed manual transmission
    QUOTE QUOTE #2

  2. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    Feb 2017
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    Hello! -I guess you and I were posting at the same time!

    You get a "WOW!" from me and another (WOW!) from those who are sitting quietly.

    Transmissions! Helical gearing!

    Very glad you posted this! We, you and the rest of us "Mericans" are having an interesting week. This work, your work is a very pleasant distraction.

    Thank you for sharing!

    -Don
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #3

  3. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    Beautiful finishing to the Aluminum. Have you tried the sanding 1953 Ford 3 speed manual transmission sponges made by 3M?

    They make a series of them, I like the "Superfine" "Fine", and if it's needed, they offer a "Ultrafine"

    1953 Ford 3 speed manual transmission-img_7053-jpg
    Last edited by MODEL A MODEL; 11-07-20 at 10:25 AM.
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #4

  4. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    Question? I see Aluminum, of course, and some Stainless Steel? -do you use 12L14? -the Leaded Steel that is suppose to machine as easily as Brass?
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #5

  5. gbritnell's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    George
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    Jul 2006
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    I used to use 12L quite a bit. I found that it could start to rust very easily. I was turned on to 1144 stressproof steel for making crankshafts. It cuts very nicely, not quite like 12L but really nice, and it doesn't have a propensity to rust, so I pretty much use it exclusively for mild steel parts. 1018 is generally referred to as just CRS (cold rolled steel) It cuts ok but doesn't get the surface finish of 1144 and it's a little gummier.
    303 stainless cuts nice so that's what I use when making stainless parts.
    gbritnell


    1953 Ford 3 speed manual transmission
    QUOTE QUOTE #6

  6. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    Thanks!

    I was thinking of using 12L for my stub axles, I have an IMS very close to where I work, and they, (if you don't know, are like a supermarket of metals), they stock 303 and 1018 in convenient sizes, precut, 12 and 36 inches. I'll ask about 1144.

    I have mixed success with Stainless, I love the look, and I know most of the techniques for changing it's appearance. I have problems with galling when using hardware. (Disney insists on 1/4-20 SS hardware, and a few years ago I was working on a project that had 100's of 1/4-20 Rivnuts!)(there was a learning curve to success)

    Do you have any suggestions for leaf springs?
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #7

  7. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    Super nice transmission! Way over my ability, but I don't complain!
    QUOTE QUOTE #8

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