Close

The Mighty KNUCKLEHEAD
Goal amount for this year: 518 USD, Received: 200.00 USD (39%)
Scalemotorcars is a free and open community devoted to scale modeling. The heart and soul of Scalemotorcars is our global community of over 10,000+ contributors, millions of readers, and donors like yourself all united to share unlimited access to reliable information. Your donations keep Scalemotorcars freely available to everyone.

This years bandwidth costs, hosting service, domain registration, software licensing fees, and maintenance cost have a balance of $518 due by the end of August. Please help us keep Scalemotorcars growing by making a donation today.
Thank you.


The Mighty KNUCKLEHEAD The Mighty KNUCKLEHEAD The Mighty KNUCKLEHEAD The Mighty KNUCKLEHEAD The Mighty KNUCKLEHEAD
Accepted Payment Types

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 26
    1. Kit: , by (Established Member) TOMc is offline
      Builder Last Online: Aug 2019 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/8 Rating:  (1 votes - 5.00 average) Thanks: 0
      Started: 12-02-18 Build Revisions: Never  
      Not Supported

      Attachment 33602
      This is a file photo of a rough finished, Model Factory Hiro The Mighty KNUCKLEHEAD Co. 1940 - 47 HD Nucklehead in 1/9 scale. The photo gives a good idea of what the die-cast kit involves. Back in the day, and I am not sure which one, my first ride was a 650cc TRIUMPH. I do not remember which model but it had a Magneto and Spark-advance and may have been older than me. A few more bikes and many years later and I was riding a 1975 HD Super Glide with a 1200cc OHV Shovelhead engine. Harleys were built by AMF then, not a good thing but it kept the HOG alive. With this machine I learned what a motor cycle was all about how to keep it on the road.
      Show Complete First Post

      Show Your Support

      • This build may not be copied, reproduced or published elsewhere without author's permission.
        Please note: The first post will be displayed at the top of every page.
    JOIN THE SMC ALLIANCE NOW

  1. TOMc's Avatar Established Member
    Name
    THOMAS
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    159
    Lets see if this works a little better.
    The Mighty KNUCKLEHEAD-l1600-jpg


    The Mighty KNUCKLEHEAD
    QUOTE QUOTE #2

  2. TOMc's Avatar Established Member
    Name
    THOMAS
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    159
    I have spent many winter hours out in the shed with a warm mug of apple cyder atop the kerosene heater, a tub of MOTHERS polish and some rags. There is just something about polished aluminum that makes me feel good. The fenders and gas tanks of the Knucklehead will be red over primer The Mighty KNUCKLEHEAD . Most of the metal detail parts are to small for polish and not right for paint so I am going with Copper/Nickel electroplate where appropriate. My skill with electroplate has improved but not mastered. Remember not to over due it or it will look cooked.
    The Mighty KNUCKLEHEAD-p1040421-jpg


    The Mighty KNUCKLEHEAD
    QUOTE QUOTE #3

  3. TOMc's Avatar Established Member
    Name
    THOMAS
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    159
    While looking for some low gloss black enamel The Mighty KNUCKLEHEAD I came across a bottle of leftover 1932 FORD Engine Green. I think it will have a better look than the red previously chosen for the fenders and gas tanks. Meanwhile work on the engine continues. There are 22 different simulated nut, bolt, screw etc. all labeled as rivets but with a good pair of magnifying glasses and some patience this should not be a problem.
    The Mighty KNUCKLEHEAD-p1040435-jpg


    The Mighty KNUCKLEHEAD
    QUOTE QUOTE #4

  4. TOMc's Avatar Established Member
    Name
    THOMAS
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    159
    This die-cast is a whole new thing for me. I found that even after a part is sanded, washed, primed and a top coat of enamel The Mighty KNUCKLEHEAD , the paint may still chip. So it's a deep breath and carry-on, carry-on. Considering that my 75 Super Glide came from the factory with sloppy welds and random heaps of slag, chipped paint can only be an improvement.
    The Mighty KNUCKLEHEAD-p1040446-jpgThe Mighty KNUCKLEHEAD-p1040447-jpg


    The Mighty KNUCKLEHEAD
    QUOTE QUOTE #5

  5. TOMc's Avatar Established Member
    Name
    THOMAS
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    159
    Take a look at this screw up. I set up the wheels in the lathe, to make polishing more manageable and the lathe ate it. Ya, ya it was my fault, the wheel was not chucked up properly. I found a reasonably priced replacement on ebay so now I will have plenty of spare parts.
    The Mighty KNUCKLEHEAD-p1040453-jpg


    The Mighty KNUCKLEHEAD
    QUOTE QUOTE #6

  6. TOMc's Avatar Established Member
    Name
    THOMAS
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    159
    The wheels are finished. I remember the day when I replaced the rusted rear spokes on my Super Glide with stainless steel ones. The process of lacing the wheels on the model is the same, with each spoke having a tensioner. Installing the 160 spokes went beyond patience, it took endurance.
    The Mighty KNUCKLEHEAD-p1040506-jpg
    The Mighty KNUCKLEHEAD-p1040509-jpg


    The Mighty KNUCKLEHEAD
    QUOTE QUOTE #7

  7. krow113's Avatar Active Member
    Name
    James
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    89
    Looks good!
    160 spokes? There only 40 spokes each wheel!
    Last edited by krow113; 02-07-19 at 03:15 PM. Reason: add
    QUOTE QUOTE #8

  8. TOMc's Avatar Established Member
    Name
    THOMAS
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    159
    It is 160 spokes after the do-over. The valve stem should be located on the outside of the wheel, that is, when the bike is leaning on the side stand (left) the valve stem is accessible, especially the rear stem. I should have remembered that detail after an incident in New Jersey when some fool let the air out of the rear tire of my Super Glide. I had to crawl around in the dirt to reach the stem in order to attach my Inflator. The Inflator was from a small kit that I made up for emergency road repairs. The kit included a semi-home-made device that would discharge a small replaceable CO2 cartridge. It got more than one biker home after the long ride. When I related this story to Emily she asked, with that typical female wisdom "why didn't you just call the Guy".
    The Mighty KNUCKLEHEAD-p1040506-jpg


    The Mighty KNUCKLEHEAD
    QUOTE QUOTE #9

  9. TOMc's Avatar Established Member
    Name
    THOMAS
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    159
    Between the bent wheel, misaligned frame and engine fiasco, the last few weeks have been a burden to my patience and calm demeanor. I have decided to display the partially built machine as a Barn Find and save the remaining parts as spare-parts. So here we go again, page one of instructions. The rear cylinder head parts R7-R11 and front cylinder head parts F7-F11 are incorrect as shown on page one of the instruction sheet and should be reversed. If you follow the instructions you will have a very bad day trying to fit the push rod covers.
    The Mighty KNUCKLEHEAD-p1040524-jpg
    The Mighty KNUCKLEHEAD-p1040525-jpg


    The Mighty KNUCKLEHEAD
    QUOTE QUOTE #10

  10. TOMc's Avatar Established Member
    Name
    THOMAS
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    159
    The spare Ver. A 1940 muffler is finished. The tube diameter just wasn't right and had a seam, so I made another from a warn out Excel knife handle. This time I put a little more care into surface preparation so there were less scratches. Copper/nickel plating is not like primer The Mighty KNUCKLEHEAD paint and will not fill in a scratch, but will darken the blemish and make it more evident.

    The Mighty KNUCKLEHEAD-p1040536-jpg


    The Mighty KNUCKLEHEAD
    QUOTE QUOTE #11

  11. TOMc's Avatar Established Member
    Name
    THOMAS
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    159
    As you can see the primary cover looks much better when the nickel-plate is not burnt on. The gentle brush is a tool of patience.

    The Mighty KNUCKLEHEAD-p1040532-jpg


    The Mighty KNUCKLEHEAD
    QUOTE QUOTE #12

  12. TOMc's Avatar Established Member
    Name
    THOMAS
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    159
    The engine is installed and it fit perfectly. I am posting a picture of an actual frame and the part that gave me the most trouble. Solution: Cut the compound curve at its base and square the parts, remove about 1/32" of the center metal piece and fit the adjusted part in the frame. Then glue it at the new contact point, eezy/pezy.

    The Mighty KNUCKLEHEAD-p1040558-jpg
    The Mighty KNUCKLEHEAD-p1040557-jpg
    The Mighty KNUCKLEHEAD-p1040554-jpg
    The Mighty KNUCKLEHEAD-p1040550-jpg


    The Mighty KNUCKLEHEAD
    QUOTE QUOTE #13

  13. krow113's Avatar Active Member
    Name
    James
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    89
    Looks good.
    Viewing from the rear I see that my rear brake cross-over tube is not parallel with the other frame components , maybe check yours. Mine is canted up at the outside noticeably.
    QUOTE QUOTE #14

  14. TOMc's Avatar Established Member
    Name
    THOMAS
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    159
    krow113....Poste a picture of the problem if you can.
    Although the construction of this model is providing me with a great deal of enjoyment it does have its moments. I find that the metal is unforgiving and it does have a tight learning curve. So if metal is the problem I have some spare parts you can have.


    The Mighty KNUCKLEHEAD
    QUOTE QUOTE #15

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Quick Scale Calculator

 
Scale Calculator   Scale Factor   Real Size:     + Deluxe Scale Calculator
  1: th   Which equals Convert measurement: Reset or clear:  
  Any Scale   Scale Size:     + Deluxe Metric Calculator
 
Top