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    1. Kit: , by (VIP/Sponsor) sydeem is offline
      Builder Last Online: Aug 2014 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/8 Rating:  Thanks: 0
      Started: 05-26-08 Build Revisions: Never  
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      Plumbing Questions

      While waiting for the brass blacking solution, I thought I might work on the cockpit subassemblies. Can any of you historians help me with a problem with the kit-plumbing diagram? What is a pulsometer? In the reference pictures I have and the diagram here it looks like a sight gauge. In the diagram the oil goes from the tank to an oil pump then to this gauge when it seems more logical it would go to the mixture control (I plan a break at the X and a line to the mixture cylinder.)

      The diagram also shows the gas line from the selector switch to a filter then on to the carburetor. Actually I think the filter outlet should go to the mixture control, mix with castor oil and then on to the carburetor. Instead the kit suggests a closed loop from the bottom of the mixture control cylinder back to the mixture control handle.

      Interesting hand pump circuit. Looks like the hand pump is to empty residual fuel and oil in the bottom of the engine back to the main tank. If that is correct it shows how crude the technology was then. A flying bomb.

      First image is kit plumbing diagram, second image is reference picture of throttle assembly.

      Build Photos

      1/16 Sopwith Camel Cockpit-plumbing-jpg  1/16 Sopwith Camel Cockpit-throttl-gif 


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  1. Nortley's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Buck
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    408
    Hi Syd, You nailed it with "flying bomb". Anyone who even left the ground with a Camel or one of its contemporaries was brave beyond my comprehension, and to face an armed enemy with one was pure heroism. To answer your question, the pulsometer was a sight glass on the output side of the oil pump which allowed the pilot to visually verify that the oil pump was delivering oil to the intake duct. The engine was lubricated with castor oil which was dribbled into the intake air stream and thus blown through the engine and out the exhaust - there was no sump or recirculating system - some of it lubricating the bearings and bores as it passed through. Speaking of passing through, a good deal of castor oil mist was blown back into the pilot's face and inhaled, with the result that a pilot's first mission upon landing was often an urgent visit to the WWI equivalent of the porta-pot. Castor does not mix with gasoline, so it was not possible to pre-mix oil and fuel like we used to with outboard motors and old two stroke motorcycles. Given that flying a Camel took all the attention that mind, limbs, and guts could provide, I doubt the pulsometer was given much attention once off the ground. There is a fine book on the Bentley rotary, "Bentley BR2, building the quarter scale working replica", by L. K. Blackmore, ISBN 0 9519367 4 3, it was published by Camden Miniature Steam Services and was once availble from Lindsay Publications. http://www.lindsaybks.com . I can't say if they have it in stock now but it is worth a search. It includes photos and drawings of the real engine as well. Should Mario get hold of a copy of this book, look out world.
    Last edited by Nortley; 05-26-08 at 03:02 PM.
    Scorpio - Builds models the way the prototype should have been built.
    #2

  2. JohnReid's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    John Reid
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    3,081
    Take a look here for some great pics of my friend Ken's 1/15th scale Camel build.
    http://www.wwi-models.org/Images/Foran/Camel/index.html
    For Large Pictures see:

    **************************************************
    https://albatros15.imgur.com/all/
    **************************************************
    My 1:16th dioramas are now on permanent display at the Canada Aviaion and Space Museum,in Ottawa,Canada.The apprailals for the museum were done by Shep Paine who valued them at between $15,000 and $25,000 (US) each.
    #3

  3. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Jeffrey
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    Sep 2005
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    7,833
    Wow, that's one niceCamel, John. Man, with all that Castor oil, a pilot could really have a few non aviation related accidents.
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    #4

  4. mouppe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Aug 2007
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    301
    Sy,

    I think the hand pump confusion arises from the fact that on a Camel, there were two fuel tanks. The main tank, and the gravity tank with a hand pump for when the main tank pump failed. A pilot could switch to the gravity tank if the main tank ruptured or failed. In "Winged Victory" by Yeats, the pilot is constantly switching to the gravity tank, which seems to be very reliable according to the novel.

    I strongly recommend you read this novel as you build your Camel- it will enhance the model-building experience and help put the plane into context.

    Mouppe.
    #5

  5. Oklahoma Connection's Avatar Member
    Name
    Larry
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    2
    Can anybody out there help me? I build desk top models , I am building a 1/16 scale sopwith camel. This is for my new grandson . Help me with the control panel , I know the gauges are out ther some where, I am lost . Is there some place out there to find a pilot?
    #6

  6. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Kenneth
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    2,405
    Visit my Sopwith Camel album and check out reference photos like this.



    Ken
    #7

  7. Lancair IV's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Rob
    Join Date
    May 2008
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    590
    Here's some of my 1/16 Sopwith Camel







    More pictures of my entire build here: Login to a private Photobucket.com album

    Cheers
    Rob Byrnes
    Novi, Mi.

    On the Bench
    1:48 Monogram B-17 Flying Fortress (Extreem Detail)
    Scratch build Lancair 235

    In the planning Stages
    1:48 US WWII Bombers B-26, B-29

    Recently Completed
    1:48 Accurate Miniatures P-51
    1:48 Accurate Miniatures P-51A
    1:48 Accurate Miniatures P-36 Apache
    1:48 Tamiya P-51D
    #8

  8. Oklahoma Connection's Avatar Member
    Name
    Larry
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    2
    What did you guys use for gauges on the control panel ? I would like for my grandson , when he gets my age to say that my grandpa built that for me and know what he has . I know I am way out of my league here . I wanted to go to the people that know. I thought that a 6 " gi joe might make a good pilot ? Any help that you guys can give me would be great.
    #9

  9. keramh's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Marek
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    313
    hello,

    dashboard looks already very much very good.
    can you still show us pictures of the seat?
    what I of the wicker basket sees like to me very much.

    [B]www.scale16.de.vu[/B]
    the modelkit databank for the scale 1/16
    #10

  10. Lancair IV's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Rob
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    590
    I scratch built the seat out of brass following Kens build

    Start
















    Cheers
    Rob Byrnes
    Novi, Mi.

    On the Bench
    1:48 Monogram B-17 Flying Fortress (Extreem Detail)
    Scratch build Lancair 235

    In the planning Stages
    1:48 US WWII Bombers B-26, B-29

    Recently Completed
    1:48 Accurate Miniatures P-51
    1:48 Accurate Miniatures P-51A
    1:48 Accurate Miniatures P-36 Apache
    1:48 Tamiya P-51D
    #11

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