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    1. Kit: , by (VIP/Sponsor) hot ford coupe is offline
      Builder Last Online: Nov 2019 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/8 Rating:  Thanks: 1
      Started: 01-29-12 Build Revisions: Never  
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      I might as well introduce my next project right here. There's not much to do while I'm waiting for paint to dry on the Big Drag body so I'm going back to my first love. I'm starting a Big Deuce build like the one I built when I was 13 back in the early months of 1964. It'll be a relatively stock Starbird designed red Big Deuce (stock but definitely not box stock Monogram's Big Deuce Tribute Build By HFC ) with a few very, very slight changes. My original had the parts pack kit supercharger and the old white wall rear slicks added. This one will have that as well as a 40 ford dash, wire wheels, full upholstery and a bunch of other little surprises under the skin. Yes Ken, there will be a bucket full of brass parts added since, even though the newer kits are high quality, there are still a number of toy like parts that need attention. The basic look will be there but with some modernization. Here is a picture of what it's going to look like. I found this picture of a deuce for sale on the net so I'm taking no credit for the picture (except for adding the white walls)




      Monogram's Big Deuce Tribute Build By HFC
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  1. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Jeffrey
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    Another update. When you upholster a large model with opening surfaces, i.e. trunk and doors, you have to work out certain details first or else you'l do damage to your upholstery. That's what I consider the weakest link in the chain. The upholstered panels for the doors and trunk need to be installed dead last. You'll be using the kit panels but cutting them down to make room for the upholstery itself.

    What needs to be done first? The doors need to be cut out, the rough edges trimmed off and square rod (.040 Evergreen styrene Monogram's Big Deuce Tribute Build By HFC ) needs to be added to the edges and trimmed to fit the opening. Once that's done, you need to work on the door jambs. I put a tutorial on the site a long time ago which discusses that fact. Check out any of the 32 Ford ads where they're selling classics and customs. The good ones usually include tons of photos including several of the door jambs alone. Duplicate what you see with styrene Monogram's Big Deuce Tribute Build By HFC (or brass if you're scratchbuilding the body), get it trimmed up well and then paint before you put your panels into the doors. Otherwise, you'll have to mask off the upholstery and you'll damage your vinyl.

    I've decided to upholster the car in a combination of white Naugahyde with red leather inserts. I had to do some experimentation to get the panels to look neatly done. After three attempts, I finally got the materials to sit the way I wanted. It took a little redesigning of the upholstery pattern, but the way I've set it up, it will look precise and well done. The work continues.


    Monogram's Big Deuce Tribute Build By HFC
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #32

  2. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Now I've made 7 attempts to get the patterns right and am about to make #8. That attempt will be the winner. Once I get the pieces set up, I'll take some pics to show how to do it and the order to assemble and paint the parts. That way you guys won't have to reinvent the wheel, so to speak. Here I am driving myself nuts again.


    Monogram's Big Deuce Tribute Build By HFC
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #33

  3. kmeaders@q.com's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Calm Jeff, Calm. It don't mean nothin'. I'm looking forward to seeing what you're doing.
    Old Sprinter
    QUOTE QUOTE #34

  4. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Here I am driving myself nuts again.
    Jeff, the expression I use is..."Drive me to drink, I will pay for the gas!"

    Sounds like you are having as much fun as I did with the cam covers.

    Ken
    QUOTE QUOTE #35

  5. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Hey guys. The problem with "driving me crazy" is the short distance it takes to get me there. It's usually within walking distance.


    Actually, I'm quite calm and for the first time really enjoying building. I wrote down 6 rules to follow that I posted on my workbench that make things alot better. I ought to start a thread about avoiding and treating the dreaded burnout or Advanced Modelers' Syndrome. I might even help someone out.

    In any case, the attempts are more experimentation with techniques rather than failed attempts. I like to look at it this way. I made 8 attempts and found 7 ways NOT to do the doors. That's success in my book.


    Monogram's Big Deuce Tribute Build By HFC
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #36

  6. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Looks like number 8 is the charm. I finally have the technique worked out to my satisfaction. Once the upholstery parts are done, I'll need to work on the door hinges and lock.


    Monogram's Big Deuce Tribute Build By HFC
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #37

  7. kmeaders@q.com's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Man, I want to see it; got any pictures yet. Have you seen the one on the last Dirt Late Model post?
    Old Sprinter
    QUOTE QUOTE #38

  8. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    No pics yet, Ken. I'm still working on that door. The hinges will be no problem to remake but I don't have any decent gears with enough size or thinness to be effective in a lock mechanism like Jens made. I don't have the equipment to make my own and there were no decent gears at the R/C store. I'll just use the door's original lock. Meanwhile, I'm still working on the upholstery which is very time consuming and labor intensive.


    I definitely did see the last Dirt Late Model post. You did an excellent job on the wheel. The car is looking great.


    Monogram's Big Deuce Tribute Build By HFC
    QUOTE QUOTE #39

  9. kmeaders@q.com's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Quote Originally Posted by hot ford coupe View Post


    I definitely did see the last Dirt Late Model post. You did an excellent job on the wheel. The car is looking great.
    Jeff, look at post 77, at the bottom right corner. This was a joke; when I said "did you see the one"; at the bottom of the post there's a ONE. A little humor.
    Old Sprinter
    QUOTE QUOTE #40

  10. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Quote Originally Posted by kmeaders@q.com View Post
    Jeff, look at post 77, at the bottom right corner. This was a joke; when I said "did you see the one"; at the bottom of the post there's a ONE. A little humor.
    Oh fer cryin' out loud. Ya nailed me, Ken. I missed it altogether. The model still looks good though.


    Monogram's Big Deuce Tribute Build By HFC
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #41

  11. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Jeffrey
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    In modeling, there are 4 factors that make a great model no matter what level of skill at which you work. The first is good technique. I think we all know what that is. The second is good research. That we know also. The third is good planning. That way, you can adress your problems before they come up in the build. The fourth factor which is equal in importance to the other 3 is good problem solving. That's the thing that helps you get over some of the hurdles you find with each and every model. That's also the thing that helps you get out of a sticky situation so you don't wind up having to mess up your model later on for a modification that never comes up in your planning stage or on your instruction sheet. This I found when I innocently attempted to upholster this whale of a model.


    Well, what did I find and how did I overcome it? I decided to use the plastic panels in the kit as a backing for my foam and Naugahyde. That meant I had to thin out the panel to make room for the upholstery. The problem is that if I cement on the panels before the paint is put on, I need to mask off the upholstery which could lead to a lot of trouble later on. If I want to have opening doors (which I will have), I'll need to put the hinges in first which will make modifying the door to close up the gaps between the doors and the body more difficult than it needs to be. Plus, when I paint the model, I'll have areas on the inside of the hinges that won't get painted well. Also, if I cement the upholstered panel after the body is painted, I don't get to close up any gaps or defects when the panels are added to the body. I'm also making the door jambs a lot more realistic and if the hinges are in place while I'm trying to do that, I can easily break the hinges off the body leading to keeping the doors closed. If I put in the hinges and cut off the doors, I can't remove the door for construction because I'll snap the hinges. Lastly if I try to put the hinges in after I've done the paint and the doors, I'll have a ton of trouble getting them correctly in place and secured. How the devil do I overcome this mess of trouble to get what I want? Who's the boss here?? The answer is in the fact that you can't let the model tell you what you can and cannot do, you the modeler tell the model what it will become.

    Here's the solution which also added a bunch of realism to the model as well. The solution to my door problems is to go to the real thing and take a lesson from it. I decided to make new hinges in the style on the real deuce which resemble the hinges that you see in your average bedroom door. That way, I could insert the hinge parts separately, paint the body, apply the upholstery and put the door back in and put in the hinge pins just like they did at the factory. I can also put the door lock in without trouble. All problems solved.

    Here's how I solved the problem. First, I cut a slot into the door and body for the tail to secure the hinge to the body. I didn't have enough door thickness to screw them in like the real thing so I borrowed the tail idea from the original kit hinge. Next, I had to decide the best material for a hinge and that was--You guessed it--good ol' brass. It's strong enough yet thin enough to keep it in scale. I used one piece of thick and one pices of thinner Monogram's Big Deuce Tribute Build By HFC brass. I soldered a 1/16 in. piece of brass tube onto the end of one piece parallel to the width of the brass strip. Then I soldered a piece of strip to make an angle with the first piece. I contoured it and cut out a small section of the tube for the second piece of the hinge. Next, I took a thinner Monogram's Big Deuce Tribute Build By HFC piece of strip, made the male portion of the hinge by soldering a short piece of 1/32 in. tube to the end of that. Instead of soldering the tail onto the second strip, I bent it in place because it was much easier to bend than the first strip. Next, I took some of the 1/32 in. tube and filled in the uper and lower pertion of the 1/16 in. tube on the first piece. The cutout remains open for the second part. Finally, I put a thin piece of wire, thick enough to fit the hole in the 1/32 in. tube to close the hinge. I can pull thatpiece of wire out to release the door for its modifications. Here's what it all looked like.










    If you have any questions, I'll be here to answer them.


    Monogram's Big Deuce Tribute Build By HFC
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #42

  12. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    I went and secured the hinges in the door and decided to take a few pics to show how it came out. I think the result came out pretty well for a novice brass wrangler.



    The first thing I did was cement the hinge tails into some recessed areas on the inside of the door and the body using CA. Then I took my soldering iron and a piece of the sprue Monogram's Big Deuce Tribute Build By HFC tree Monogram's Big Deuce Tribute Build By HFC and secured and filled the area over the tails. Once the plastic cooled which took less than 30 seconds, the hinges were in rock solid. Using the plastic welding technique gives you the best fill you can get. Like Don Garrett showed us, unlike putty Monogram's Big Deuce Tribute Build By HFC , there is no drying or setting time, no shrinkage and the resulting filled area has the same strength as the original plastic. Here are a few more pictures.

    Here it is up clsoe and personal. When you pull out the hinge pins, the door comes right off like the real deal.

    you can see how straight the hinges hold the door. It feels pretty solid when you close and open the door. I'm going to attempt to make a working door lock like Jens showed us in his model T .



    Again, up close and personal.



    This picture demonstrates (although a little distorted by the angle) that in order for the door to open the top hinge must be located directly over the lower one. Otherwise, you can't get the door to open. There can only be one axis of rotation. Here's a shot from the rear at a better angle.



    This is what the inside of the door looks like right after the styrene Monogram's Big Deuce Tribute Build By HFC cooled. All I need to do is clean up and trim the areas down so I'll be able to fit the door panel.




    Monogram's Big Deuce Tribute Build By HFC
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #43

  13. Ton's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    The hinges look great now that they are positioned!
    Regards

    Ton
    QUOTE QUOTE #44

  14. Speaking of planning, you might want to open up the door gaps a little. The body looks good now, but once you paint it those gaps will close up in a hurry.
    This don't look like no expressway to me! - Jake Blues
    QUOTE QUOTE #45

  15. Don Garrett's Avatar Asst. Administrator
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    Don
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    Fantastic job on the hinges Jeff.
    Just as a suggestion for anyone duplicating what you've already explained......

    For an even stronger bond to prevent the brass from pulling out where you "welded" the hinges to the inside of the body...a small hole or two could be drilled in them.
    This would allow the melted plastic to flow through the holes & fuse with the body. In effect this would pin the hinges to the plastic.
    Just a little added insurance to prevent a hinge from loosening up due to over zealous handling.
    Grandpa McGurk.....Steppin' Large and Livin' easy.
    TDRinnovations.com
    QUOTE QUOTE #46

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