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    1. Kit: , by (Member) Rick is offline
      Builder Last Online: Aug 2014 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/8 Rating:  Thanks: 0
      Started: 07-08-08 Build Revisions: Never  
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      I'm going to build a Willys Woody, useing parts from a MF fiberglass coupe body. As you can see, the body still requires more cutting, but when thats done, I'll be starting with front fenders, hood, cowl and windshield. I've established the wheelbase and will either build a custom chassis or modify one from an 8th scale Vette. Once I have a chassis, I can start with a floor and build my wood body up and out from there.

      The photo of the real Willys Woody is an example of where I'd like to go, but with a few changes. I'll probably go with red or orange body parts, light coloured wood and either a cloth or painted top.

      Here's where I'd appreciate your comments and suggestions. I'm wondering what kind of wood to use and how to attach it to the glass body. I'm also wondering about what to use for the roof and how to attach it to the windshield and wood body.

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      Building A Willys Woody-p1010031-jpg  Building A Willys Woody-p1010032-jpg  Building A Willys Woody-4xwillys_wavecrest_lindsay-jpg 


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  1. Deuces-wild's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Guido
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    How about using "Teak" wood for the door and rear panels??
    Be nice or else ~1~**
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  2. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Jeffrey
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    I've never seen one of those. That would be a perfect subject because of its rarity. Does teak have a small enough grain to look realistic?
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
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  3. Don Garrett's Avatar Asst. Administrator
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    How high is up Rick? Help us out here. You going for the Retro Rod, Custom, Boydster.....what does it want to be? Wood....you could go with maple, oak and do all the butt, lap and pinned joints or you could keep it simple and grab some LHS Building A Willys Woody stuff. Depending on where you are headed, If you are doing the retro fabric top I have some polyester (tight knit) material in black, green or burgundy...Also if you are going the show car route...I have some tan suede that's thin enough to brass pin (rivet) to the top. The edge that contacts the windshield depends on the look you are after.
    Grandpa McGurk.....Steppin' Large and Livin' easy.
    TDRinnovations.com
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  4. mouppe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Oak has a very large grain and would be unsuitable for close-up details.

    Maple, walnut and boxwood would be better choices, and come up very nicely when stained as well. These are the woods that ship modellers most commonly use. You will find them easy to get hold of, and easy to shape as well.

    Here is a photo of a door trim I made held in place with brass tacks. The wood is red coral wood, similar to bloodwood. Very easy to work with, and because the grain is very small, it does not split when you drill holes etc.

    Mouppe.
    Attached Images Attached Images Building A Willys Woody-door-005-jpg 
    Last edited by mouppe; 07-08-08 at 03:07 PM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #5

  5. BigTallDad's Avatar Member
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    OK, I'm a newbie but I've done some experimentation on a '48 Ford Sportsman convertible.

    Go to a cigar store; boxes of cigars have separators between the layers; these separators are about 1/32" thick and are made of cedar. They can be stained, bleached, bent (after soaking in water) and you can get a beautiful finish by using clear lacquer Building A Willys Woody .

    The grain tightness varies, but in some cases you can achieve a book-end look.

    Best thing of all is the stores typically throw them away (translation: free).
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  6. harrypri's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Another alternative is basswood. Easy to cut and shape, takes stain well, cheap, available at hobby shops and craft stores in many sizes and shapes, including sheets and strips.

    My local Hobby Lobby has a whole display of various sizes and shapes.

    Then there's the old standby, balsa. Same as basswood but softer and a more obvious grain pattern. Can be stained to simulate just about any other species. The interior "woodwork" here is balsa, stained and satin Polyurethaned.

    "What do you get when you cross an insomniac, an agnostic, and a dyslexic? Someone who stays up all night wondering if there really is a dog"–Groucho Marx
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  7. Rick's Avatar Member
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    Rick
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    Thanks everybody! Don, this won't be a radical build. As the photo of the real car shows, the roof will be stock hieght and it will be a two door. The back will be leaned forward slightly just to clean up the look. I might also pancake the hood. I'll IM you re the fabrick, thanks.


    Building A Willys Woody
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  8. BigTallDad's Avatar Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by harrypri View Post
    Another alternative is basswood. Easy to cut and shape, takes stain well, cheap, available at hobby shops and craft stores in many sizes and shapes, including sheets and strips.

    My local Hobby Lobby has a whole display of various sizes and shapes.

    Then there's the old standby, balsa. Same as basswood but softer and a more obvious grain pattern. Can be stained to simulate just about any other species. The interior "woodwork" here is balsa, stained and satin Polyurethaned.

    Hey, Harry do you have a base for that one?
    QUOTE QUOTE #9

  9. harrypri's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Harry
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    You know it!!!
    "What do you get when you cross an insomniac, an agnostic, and a dyslexic? Someone who stays up all night wondering if there really is a dog"–Groucho Marx
    QUOTE QUOTE #10

  10. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Jeffrey
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    Balsa it is then. The grain on Harry's work looks pretty darn good and extremely realistic even way up close. The only reason to use basswood then would be if more stiffness of the wood is needed.
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #11

  11. Don Garrett's Avatar Asst. Administrator
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    Don
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    There are some "nice" veneers available as well if you just want to apply the wood trim to a solid side piece...the grain and color would match from panel to panel too.
    Grandpa McGurk.....Steppin' Large and Livin' easy.
    TDRinnovations.com
    QUOTE QUOTE #12

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