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Thread: 39 Lincoln 8

    1. Kit: , by (VIP/Sponsor) hot ford coupe is offline
      Builder Last Online: Feb 2021 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/8 Rating:  Thanks: 0
      Started: 12-21-07 Build Revisions: Never  
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      I've got my generator about 95% complete. All I need to do at this point is to add another bolt to hold the bracket to the generator body, add the wash into the stainless steel part, finish the wiring and possibly put some weathering 39 Lincoln 8 on that. I need some opinions on that last one. To weather or not to weather? To keep it pristine and clean or make it look used? If you think it needs something, I can still correct it as the parts are all bolted together. The bolts on the back end are painted 00-90 39 Lincoln 8 brass bolts with the corresponding brass washers. I did scuff up the bolts a bit to show some wrench marks and add some definition.

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  1. Rick's Avatar Member
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    Rick
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    Inspirational Jeff. Keep it comming!
    QUOTE QUOTE #2

  2. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Jeffrey
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    I'll tell you sometimes I surprise myself and something comes out better than I expected. Like I had said, there's still some touching up to do and that I'll be doing in a few days after Christmas. I'll be going out of town tomorrow morning and won't have any internet to work from. I'll be back again on Weds. night and will work on finishing the heads.


    39 Lincoln 8
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #3

  3. Bob Cline's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Jeff,

    I like to see something portrayed as relistically as possible. To me, that means: just enough weathering 39 Lincoln 8 to take off some of the "gloss"; toned down kit "chrome" and just enough "dirt" to make is seemed used but very well maintained.

    Difficult to describe but in the end, whatever is done has only to please the builder.

    Have you looked at the new Tamiya 39 Lincoln 8 weathering 39 Lincoln 8 kits? There are 4 variations with 3 "colors" in each from dirt and grease to "blued" chrome.
    No Lathe, No Mill, No CNC
    QUOTE QUOTE #4

  4. unknownname's Avatar Active Member
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    Jeff, if this is going to be cast, don't weather anything, because the paint could be picked up in the castings. I would just finish it like it was new and then weather it after it has been cast.

    Looks good.
    Skippy
    QUOTE QUOTE #5

  5. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Jeffrey
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    Thanks for the tip, Bob. That's the way I feel about it too. It really adds to the realism. The only problem I had was that a lot of times builders use weathering 39 Lincoln 8 to hide some of the defects. I didn't want to give that impression.

    Skip, that part won't be cast. It's in 1/6 scale so if I did turn some 1/8 parts, I'd scale them down. It's not that difficult to do. I'm not all that nuts about casting 39 Lincoln 8 resin 39 Lincoln 8 parts unless I need to produce them in multiple quantities. That definitely is another story. I like the feeling of having all hand made parts in a build, all one offs. Also, the master is usually the most detailed part I can make. If I cast one, I still have to do all of that cleanup, sharpening edges, smoothing surfaces, etc. Since I do that with the original, I just leave it at that.


    39 Lincoln 8
    Last edited by hot ford coupe; 12-22-07 at 03:37 PM.
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #6

  6. slingshot's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Your Lincoln engine is really coming along great!

    Coming from airplanes, to me there are two different techniques you can use, one is shading which just highlights areas for shadows and for areas that light will hit more, and weathering 39 Lincoln 8 which shows use.

    I guess alternately it will depend on how you are depending to show your model:

    1) You were old enough and bought the car in 39 ( not really old enough, just fantasy!) and drove it for a year or two in which case the engine and especially undersides would definitely need some weathering 39 Lincoln 8

    2) You had the car restored today but use it as a driver that keep it fairly clean, in that case there would be some paint chips and some weathering 39 Lincoln 8 , but it would still be somewhat clean

    3) You had the car restored to Pebble Beach standards and virtually never drive it, any paint chip would be touched up and any speck of dust or mud immediately cleaned off, in that case no weathering 39 Lincoln 8

    With any of the above, shading would still benefit and showing the lowlights and highlights really make the details of parts pop, especially on really dark parts of that can easily become monochromatic. Some friends use oils, others use watercolors. Watercolors are super cheap in the school section at stores, easy to mix together to get different shades and also very easy to wash off before it dries if you don’t like the look.

    I liked your philosophy on getting the parts right and has something wrong snowballs to the next part into the next. I’m drawing up The Surfers dragster that they used at the 1966 Bakersfield meet in 1/6 scale and am having one heck of a time gathering up enough correct information. Mostly going by a reconstruction of one that at least one, if not both of the original guys were involved with. I’ll have to start a thread with some of the drawings to get your guys opinions some time. Trying to find correct information sure isn’t easy and some of these old cars!
    Last edited by slingshot; 01-08-08 at 02:04 AM.
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  7. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Jeffrey
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    Thanks slingshot. That's the kind of info I need. I have some watercolors which I'll be using. I probably won't do the Pebble Beach type because that's just too clean and unrealistic for me. I'll probably do it up as not so much of a restoration but as the first one but back sometime in the early 40's as if the original owner still had it. The car would be well taken care of but not immaculate. I'l probably be looking for some help later on. I just don't want to over do the job.


    39 Lincoln 8
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #8

  8. Don Garrett's Avatar Asst. Administrator
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    Jeff, just put your head into the engine for a bit.....gaskets back then seeped a bit (still do), exhaust manifolds rusted, dirt and road crap collected in the depressions in the intake manifold etc. Concentrate on the seams, the areas that got constant wear and tear. Buff up the areas that were likely to be wiped down by a fussy owner and call it a day.
    Walk away and look at it later with fresh eyes.....if it's mellow...LEAVE IT ALONE! Bear in mind that the engine compartment and chassis should be detailed according.
    You mentioned over doing it, well that's easy to do, but I've never seen a radiator with miles on that didn't have a few dings in the core.
    You can have extreme detailing without overdoing anything....confusing, huh?
    Grandpa McGurk.....Steppin' Large and Livin' easy.
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    QUOTE QUOTE #9

  9. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Jeffrey
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    I gotcha all the way, Don. thanks for the info. I'm going to start playing with the weathering 39 Lincoln 8 . I have some water colors, some chalks and one of those new Tamiya 39 Lincoln 8 weathering 39 Lincoln 8 kits. I'm ready to go.


    39 Lincoln 8
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #10

  10. slingshot's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    I don’t know if it will work, but on some scrap pieces I’m going to try putting a small amount of the chalk power in some Future to brush on, to make the Future flat I will either try some of the Tamiya 39 Lincoln 8 flat clear or some baby powder in it.
    QUOTE QUOTE #11

  11. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Jeffrey
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    I wonder if you can mix the chalk with some flat clear Acryl and brush that on. I assume if the stuff mixes with Future, it would mix well with the acrylic 39 Lincoln 8 paint. It should flatten out without any additional material. I'll have to try that on some scrap myself.


    39 Lincoln 8
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #12

  12. slingshot's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    It should mix fairly well, as far as I know, Future is basically like an acrylic 39 Lincoln 8 paint? I originally got the idea when I saw an article for some pigment 39 Lincoln 8 powders you could buy and then mix with a medium, I wanted to try them and saw them at Michael’s, but unfortunately you can only buy them in a pack there and I didn’t want to spend $25.00 to find out it’s not what I was looking for. I looked them up since I can remember the name and found them, I’m not endorsing this online store as I have never used them, I just found some interesting powders here. Here’s the one I originally found:

    http://www.misterart.com/g776/Jacqua...d-Pigments.htm

    And then I found these metallic powders. I would like to give these a try some time to see if they give the part a metal look, especially since it can be made anywhere from opaque to very translucent so you could alter the look with different base coats. Some of those metal paints can be pretty nasty smelling.

    http://www.misterart.com/g676/Gold-L...ca-Powders.htm
    QUOTE QUOTE #13

  13. slingshot's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    One other thing I thought of and wanted to try since Future self levels so nice is to use these powders mixed with Future to paint an entire model. I don’t know how much power is needed to make it opaque, but Future isn’t that expensive and there were quite a variety of colors of pigments that could be mixed together to get something really unique.
    QUOTE QUOTE #14

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