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Thread: 1895 Hearse

    1. Kit: , by (VIP/Sponsor) xken is offline
      Builder Last Online: Apr 2021 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/8 Rating:  Thanks: 2
      Started: 11-07-14 Build Revisions: Never  
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      I am starting on an 1895 hearse as a line extension for the horse drawn vehicles for Model Expo. Here is the CAD file so far and I will be starting in wood soon. Having moved from Ohio to California I am still trying to find certain items that were packed but have not been found so far. However, the weather here is much better than Ohio (no snow or leaves to rake).


      1895 Hearse-black-hearse-ornamentation-sm-jpg

      Ken


      1895 Hearse
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  1. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Kenneth
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    Egon, not sure but here is a photo of the real deal, I think this setup offerwed a smoother ride given the fact they did not have shock absorbers and perhaps less lateral movement. But this is where Citroen engineers started.
    1895 Hearse-dscn3644-jpg


    1895 Hearse
    "In wine there is wisdom. In beer there is strength. In water there is bacteria."
    Ken

    QUOTE QUOTE #17

  2. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Kenneth
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    Kurt,
    Which resistance unit did you get and use?

    Ken


    1895 Hearse
    "In wine there is wisdom. In beer there is strength. In water there is bacteria."
    Ken

    QUOTE QUOTE #18

  3. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Kenneth
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    I made the two U brackets and filed the D shapes on each side for the clamps with indexing holes for the front and rear bars.bars
    I moved onto the front axle stabilizer bars. First I cut two 1/8" rods to 2-1/4" long; then one end I cit a 3/64" locating pin and next a taper cut to a 1 degree taper and then annealed.
    1895 Hearse-hearse-front-bars-01-jpg

    Once annealed they were bent to a 90 degree curve at the thick end. The objective is to eventually match the ends to the holes in the brackets on the wood hitch sides.

    1895 Hearse-hearse-front-bars-02-jpg

    Once both were bent, they were then hammered to a tapered flat about half way down. Next I formed a counter bend. I marked the next bend point to be in line with the bracket hole and then made a sharp bend and hammered flat the end using the edge of the steel square for a tight inside edge.

    1895 Hearse-hearse-front-bars-03-jpg

    The ends were then drilled and a 3/64" locating pin was soldered into each. Each end was then slightly bent to adjust for the different heights.

    1895 Hearse-hearse-front-bars-04-jpg

    Once satisfied with the fits I then soldered both in place and then formed the two rear bars.

    1895 Hearse-hearse-front-bars-05-jpg

    Here is the assembly removed from the pivot bolt to better see the unit. Next I will make the four (4) spring clamps.

    1895 Hearse-hearse-front-bars-06-jpg

    These were interesting parts to form with a bit of a challenge to mate to the pins to the holes and solder.


    1895 Hearse
    "In wine there is wisdom. In beer there is strength. In water there is bacteria."
    Ken

    QUOTE QUOTE #19

  4. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Kenneth
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    Here are the front suspension parts cleaned up of excess solder at the joints. Now to move on to making the spring clamps; four in total and a few other smaller parts to finish out the front.

    Side view.
    1895 Hearse-hearse-front-suspension-08-jpg

    Front view with the aluminum wheel hubs in place.

    1895 Hearse-hearse-front-suspension-09-jpg


    1895 Hearse
    "In wine there is wisdom. In beer there is strength. In water there is bacteria."
    Ken

    QUOTE QUOTE #20

  5. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Kenneth
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    There are two different styles of spring shackles that hold the springs in place. The first set was pretty straight forward that held the matal axle to the spring, however the second set required a little "hand forging". I made a test part to verify the size and dimension and once sorted out four more were made.

    Here is the test shackle and a series showing the fabricating them. You can see in the background the metal axle shackles that were fairly simple.
    1895 Hearse-hearse-shackles-01-jpg

    Four 1/16" square rods had each end turned down 3/64" to simulate the threaded end. These shackles will be used as casting 1895 Hearse patterns so the threaded ends will be 1/16" longer for casting 1895 Hearse sprues.

    1895 Hearse-hearse-shackles-02-jpg1895 Hearse-hearse-shackles-03-jpg

    Once turned all were annealed (heated red hot 1895 Hearse and quenched in water) to soften the brass for forming. The first step was to hammer a recess using a 1/8" drill bit shank to a thickness of 1/32" resting the rod on a steel block next to the edge of the block to allow finger clearance and hold the drill bit level.

    Next working from each end to the center using a 5/16" drift punch the center portion was flattened to match the recesses using the least amount of hammer blows. Hammering is now work hardening the metal.
    Once satisfied with the even thickness using the drift punch then straighten, file an smooth and even the edges.


    1895 Hearse-hearse-shackles-04-jpg

    Next all are annealed again to soften from the hammering and formed around a 1/8" drill bit shank held in a panavise. Before bending mark the center point with a pencil to use as a guide centered on the shank to keep each leg the same size. Once satisfied with the fit on the axle file the edge in the bend area, the flat surface will cup during the bending process.

    1895 Hearse-hearse-shackles-05-jpg

    Here is the assembly with the shacles in place and cleaned up. Keep in mind the threaded ends are longer than they will be on the cast parts.


    1895 Hearse-hearse-shackles-06-jpg

    Next the retaining plate is fabricated from a 1/16" thick sheet stock. The holes locations are determined by the top of the part and the threaded ends adjusted as needed.

    1895 Hearse-hearse-shackles-07-jpg

    Once the first plate is made and tested I then glued it with CA to bar stock that has be filed flat and then the holes drilled to match. Next the edges were filed to match so the parts are identical. I then used a hot 1895 Hearse soldering iron to separate the two from each other and cleaned the off the excess dried glue.

    1895 Hearse-hearse-shackles-08-jpg

    Even though I am working on a hearse these techniques can be easily adapted to car parts as well.


    1895 Hearse
    "In wine there is wisdom. In beer there is strength. In water there is bacteria."
    Ken

    QUOTE QUOTE #21

  6. KURTVD19's Avatar Active Member
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    Kurt
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    Ken:
    Fabulous work. Lining up the bent parts of the front steering assembly so they match up to each other and meet the holes so they can be soldered in place is much easier for you to describe than to actually do I am sure.

    You asked about the resistance soldering unit I picked up. It is the Micro Mark Model #85522. It has only a high or low setting but I haven't found this to be a problem yet. I picked it up to see if it would work with what I am doing now and so far so good. The other ones they carry are much more expensive - double and up - and are by American Beauty. I usually advocate buying the best but in this case I decided that I would work with the lesser unit to see if I needed one of the much more expensive units and if I wind up needed one of these I will offer this one to a club member at a good discount.
    As you suggested I will post some photos of building the kit of the 1869 Steam Pumper to that build later tonight.
    Kurt
    QUOTE QUOTE #22

  7. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Kenneth
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    I have finished up the front suspension with nuts and bolts, D-rings; as well as, the grab handles.
    Here is an in progress grab handle; the handles were turned on a lathe then a 1/16" rod was formed with flanges hammered on the ends for holes to accept the handle ends and nuts with a locating pin.

    1895 Hearse-hearse-grab-handles-01-jpg

    Here are the D-rings which on the real hearse have leather belts in them to limit the travel of the hitch. These were sawed out of 1/16" sheet stock the the shank was turned on the lathe. Holes were then drilled to accept the shanks.

    1895 Hearse-hearse-rings-01-jpg

    Here aree some overall on which you can also see the round headed bolts and nuts on the ends of the springs and grab handles.


    1895 Hearse-hearse-front-suspension-13-jpg

    1895 Hearse-hearse-front-suspension-14-jpg

    1895 Hearse-hearse-front-suspension-15-jpg

    Next onto the coffin and seat rails.


    1895 Hearse
    Last edited by xken; 12-13-14 at 04:11 PM.
    "In wine there is wisdom. In beer there is strength. In water there is bacteria."
    Ken

    QUOTE QUOTE #23

  8. 5thwheel's Avatar Active Member
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    William
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    Ken,
    Your metal work is outstanding. Coming from the early days of ferris metals in SMHDV I am quickly coming around to brass. You make it look easy.

    I have been away from the forum a while because of a computer crash, new I pad and stuff like that. I had forgotten my user name and pass word; it was really hard to get back on with all the hoops to jump through; make one mistake and start all over. It is fun getting caught up. This hearse looks like a promising kit. I'm happy to be able to follow your work again.

    Bill
    QUOTE QUOTE #24

  9. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Kenneth
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    Bill,
    Glad to hear you are back; having recently moved from Ohio to California I know what it is like.
    Here are a couple of pictures od seat rail and coffin rails.
    1895 Hearse-hearse-seat-rail-jpg


    The round portions of the rail stantions are bumpers to protect the coffin if it drifts from side to side.
    1895 Hearse-hearse-coffin-rails-01-jpg

    1895 Hearse-hearse-coffin-rails-02-jpg

    Next will be the two door latches that I would like to make functional.


    1895 Hearse
    "In wine there is wisdom. In beer there is strength. In water there is bacteria."
    Ken

    QUOTE QUOTE #25

  10. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Kenneth
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    1895 Hearse-hearse-door-latch-01-jpg
    Making the second latch for the front door; here is the rear door latch and its components.
    1895 Hearse-hearse-latch-01-jpg
    The latches are functional and will work. The center round part is a bushing that is the thickness of the wood with an I.D. sized the match the square shank on the handle.

    I then added the lanterns and whip holder. If they look familiar they are the same as the Allerton.
    1895 Hearse-hearse-views-01-jpg

    Here is a closeup. Many of the auxilery cast parts will have a "Brass" finish using the Krylon Gold Foil paint.

    1895 Hearse-hearse-views-04-jpg

    The laser cut parts have arrived and after finishing the second latch and seat cushion I will build the wheels.


    1895 Hearse
    "In wine there is wisdom. In beer there is strength. In water there is bacteria."
    Ken

    QUOTE QUOTE #26

  11. Tony's Avatar Active Member
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    Tony
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    Love your brass work, great to see you addiction to the yellow stuff is still alive and well
    It's easier to destroy, than it is to create
    QUOTE QUOTE #27

  12. KURTVD19's Avatar Active Member
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    Kurt
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    Ken:
    Very interesting build. Love the working door handles. The front suspension/steering assembly is remarkable.
    Merry Christmas.
    Take care,
    Kurt
    QUOTE QUOTE #28

  13. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Kenneth
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    Received the first round laser parts and spent time assembling them; photographing the steps and started the assembly instructions and will go as far as I can until I need the cast parts.
    Here are the two side by side.

    Merry Christmas to all!

    1895 Hearse-hearse-jpg


    1895 Hearse
    "In wine there is wisdom. In beer there is strength. In water there is bacteria."
    Ken

    QUOTE QUOTE #29

  14. KURTVD19's Avatar Active Member
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    Kurt
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    Ken:
    How did you do up the curved piece under the driver's legs for the production kit? Just a thin piece or laser cuts on the back side? Looking good.
    Merry Christmas,
    Kurt
    QUOTE QUOTE #30

  15. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Kenneth
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    Kurt,
    It is a piece of 1/32" basswood cut with the wood grain going horizontal to be easier to bend. It could also be 1/64" plywood; the final production choice is made by Model Expo. The same is for the piece behind the seat. The long skinny section of the side wall pieces are also "oriented" with the wood grain for strength. I usually look at what I consider "tricky" parts that need idiot proofing and orient them with the wood grain as needed.


    1895 Hearse
    "In wine there is wisdom. In beer there is strength. In water there is bacteria."
    Ken

    QUOTE QUOTE #31

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