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    1. Kit: , by (VIP/Sponsor) xken is offline
      Builder Last Online: Jul 2020 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/8 Rating:  (1 votes - 5.00 average) Thanks: 3
      Started: 03-27-14 Build Revisions: Never  
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      I am still waiting for the Allerton decals to arrive. However I got the go ahead from Model Expo for the next project a 1890 Ladder Wagon. I photographed and measured the existing wagon at the Wayne County Historical Society and then drew it up in CAD. This is my first experience of having a full size CAD drawing of a subject to build. I have sent the CAD file for the laser cut wood for the frame and wheels. In the meantime I made my own frame rail by wet forming 1/8" x 1/4" basswood stock.

      Here is what the real one looks like.



      Here is the frame rail laying on the CAD drawing.



      Once the frame was constructed I decided to build the most complex components on the wagon, the fifth wheel assembly. Here is the fifth wheel with the front axle and frame attachment in place.



      Here is a closeup of a technique I use in soldering in close quarters. The two short braces were formed and filed for a tight fit and clipped in place with small alligator clips 1890 Ladder Wagon . Then I removed the nut that was close to the joint and added Yellow Ochre that protects an area from being soldered. In this case I am protecting the threads and the area at the bottom with the hole. This way I can solder the braces in place for a correct fit. This was also done on the backside as well.


      This shows the fifth wheel in place as well as the frame braces. Again the main brace is one piece with the center hole to attach to the fifth wheel and the "V" section formed and soldered in place.


      Next I will work on the forward hitch which fits into the two parallel arms on the fifth wheel.

      Ken
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  1. Ton's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Ton
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    This is the start of another gem!
    Regards

    Ton
    QUOTE QUOTE #2

  2. DominiqueBeerts's Avatar Avid Belgian
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    I MUST subscribe to the new thread of the Master.
    Best regards,
    Dominique.


    Feel free to browse through my photo albums
    QUOTE QUOTE #3

  3. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Kenneth
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    Here is the front hitch setup; can be pulled by a team of men using the rope or a team of horses using a horse hitch indexed in the rings below the hitch.

    The oval rings will have the pulling rope fed through them.



    Here is the overall hitch facing forward.


    Here it is turned with the fifth wheel.


    Next I will be working on the axle bracing before getting into the upper frame stuff.


    1890 Ladder Wagon
    "In wine there is wisdom. In beer there is strength. In water there is bacteria."
    Ken

    QUOTE QUOTE #4

  4. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Kenneth
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    Working away on the axle braces and they are slow going since I have to make square nuts where needed for casting 1890 Ladder Wagon in place.

    Here are the front right axle braces in place with hex nuts holding them in place and will be replaced later. Anyone have a source for 0-80 1890 Ladder Wagon square nuts?



    Here are the braces themselves the angled ones are for the front while the straight straps are for the rear axle.



    Here is the rear axle with braces waiting to be attached.



    Tomorrow I will be off to California for my granddaughter's baptism and visit with our daughter in Morro Bay.


    1890 Ladder Wagon
    "In wine there is wisdom. In beer there is strength. In water there is bacteria."
    Ken

    QUOTE QUOTE #5

  5. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Kenneth
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    I added the frame braces from the front axle to the rear axle that help with the beam strength. This concept of stiffing was used on early cars as well. Here you can also see the running boards for the men to stand on.




    Here is the rear axle cross bracing; next I will be adding the cross bracing for the running boards. These wagons required a great deal of bracing to have enough strength to carry the loads of ladders and people.


    Now back to more bracing, I will finish all the structure below the frame first and then work on the upper structure that carried the ladders.


    1890 Ladder Wagon
    "In wine there is wisdom. In beer there is strength. In water there is bacteria."
    Ken

    QUOTE QUOTE #6

  6. DominiqueBeerts's Avatar Avid Belgian
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    Dominique
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    Quote Originally Posted by xken View Post
    Anyone have a source for 0-80 1890 Ladder Wagon square nuts?
    Can't you center drill a square rod, then inner-thread it and part a piece off on the lathe?
    Just my two cents.
    Best regards,
    Dominique.


    Feel free to browse through my photo albums
    QUOTE QUOTE #7

  7. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Kenneth
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    Dominique,

    Yes you are correct; however to chuck a square rod I need a four jaw self centering chuck for my lathe which I do not own now but will in the near future.
    Thanks for the thought!

    Ken


    1890 Ladder Wagon
    "In wine there is wisdom. In beer there is strength. In water there is bacteria."
    Ken

    QUOTE QUOTE #8

  8. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Kenneth
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    In have been busy while the site was down.

    Here is a overall left side view.


    Here is a left front view.



    Here is the front axle turned. Keep in mind this was a wagon pulled by men. The oval shapes were hand grips to maneuver the wagon at the scene.



    This shows the rope reel and the two grooves were to start the ends of the rope once they were passed through the to oval hand grips.



    This shows the rope reel locking pins in place. Only enough rope was let out for the number of men to pull the wagon and then the pins were put back in place to lock the reel in place.



    Now onto the metal ladder parts; I hope to have the main large ladder function with the crank handle and pulley to extend the ladder. The main ladder rested on the inclined rollers and was unloaded from the rear of the wagon while shorter one piece ladders rested on the wood cross members.


    1890 Ladder Wagon
    "In wine there is wisdom. In beer there is strength. In water there is bacteria."
    Ken

    QUOTE QUOTE #9

  9. DominiqueBeerts's Avatar Avid Belgian
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    Dominique
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    What is your secret in making two (or more) identical parts like the rope reel supports? They need to be exact matches because the smallest difference will show in either height or curvature, with the rope reel "hanging" in a very awkward way as a result.
    Best regards,
    Dominique.


    Feel free to browse through my photo albums
    QUOTE QUOTE #10

  10. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Kenneth
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    Dominique, there is no secret just careful building two at the same time. For example on the front reel support brackets I cut two lengths of bar stock then bent the 90 degree bends first. The two were then cut to the same height and the round pivots were soldered in place. Then the two short lengths were then cut and soldered in place and filed to match while side by side with a piece of 1/8 diameter rod through the pivot holes. Next the top of the short bar was drilled with a 1/32" drill bit to provide a mechanical interlock with the rod. Then I turned the ends of two 1/16" rods down to 1/32" to insert into the holes on the top of the bar. Next I annealed the two turned ends of the 1/16" rods to allow for easier bending. I then bent the rod ends to the curve using needle nose pliers and soldered them in place. I then bent the rear length to match on the frame and cut off the excess.

    The key is to do both at the same time with a bit of patience to get them to match.

    I hope this helps.


    1890 Ladder Wagon
    "In wine there is wisdom. In beer there is strength. In water there is bacteria."
    Ken

    QUOTE QUOTE #11

  11. DominiqueBeerts's Avatar Avid Belgian
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    Dominique
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    I knew I am missing something: something called "patience"

    Thanks Ken, clear as a whistle. I guess I am still struggling with the "translation" from kit building to brass scratch building.
    Sometimes I don't see those small steps you need to be aware of when you have to break down the parts into smaller bits or actions.
    But it will come ...
    Best regards,
    Dominique.


    Feel free to browse through my photo albums
    QUOTE QUOTE #12

  12. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Kenneth
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    Here is a benefit of working with CAD that I have come to enjoy. The wood frame is an arc and the three ladder rollers must each align on a straight line. The result of working on the drawing was the elimination of a great deal of trial and error fitting. This fit the first time.



    Here is the close up of the locking pins for the rope reel. Only so much rope was let out for the number of men pulling and then the pins were inserted so there was no excess rope. The pin would stop against the support frame.
    I wonder what the calorie burn was running up a hill pulling this?


    Still waiting for the laser cut parts for the ladder frame with all the holes for the rungs; so I started on the metal parts for the ladder. Here is the top rope pulley for the main ladder. The wing nut is threaded 0-80 1890 Ladder Wagon threads.



    Here is a breakdown of the pulley assembly the wood part is the top rung of the ladder. The threads are 0-80 1890 Ladder Wagon and should be duplicated in the white metal casting 1890 Ladder Wagon .



    Now back to other metal ladder parts.


    1890 Ladder Wagon
    "In wine there is wisdom. In beer there is strength. In water there is bacteria."
    Ken

    QUOTE QUOTE #13

  13. Tage's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Daniel
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    I'm enjoying this Ken.
    Duke of Burl
    QUOTE QUOTE #14

  14. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Kenneth
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    Tage, glad to hear you are enjoying; perhaps you will buy the kit when available. Dominique following is a sequence to give you an idea of making multiple parts.

    Here are two ladder stops. I turned two round pieces and also formed two stops and soldered them to match each other. Now the trick was to solder them together so that the angles matched each other. I placed both on double sided carpet tape that was applied to a piece of scrap plywood.

    Here they are soldered together. Note that I flooded the joint with excess solder once they were joined so I would have enough solder to form radii. First solder the two joints with a very hot 1890 Ladder Wagon iron while holding the round piece with a scribe so as not to move. You have to be quick because the carpet tape adhesive breaks down with heat. Move back and forth between the two assemblies until completed.


    This shows them with all the excess solder filed off to form the radii. The solder withstands the 380 degrees for the vulcanized molds. The round holes the rod is through are then filed to square holes using a square needle file again with patience to make sure they maintain their alignment with each other.



    Here you can see the square holes as well as the rope arm to rotate the assembly when mounted in the ladder frame. Also my 4 jaw chuck arrived and I turned the ends of the square rod that will index into the ladder frame. I used a U.S. penny for scale reference.


    Here are the parts so far ready to add to the wood frame. Here the square nut and wing nut are threaded 0-80 1890 Ladder Wagon .


    Now onto more ladder parts.


    1890 Ladder Wagon
    "In wine there is wisdom. In beer there is strength. In water there is bacteria."
    Ken

    QUOTE QUOTE #15

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