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  1. Rick's Avatar Member
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    Rick
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    As you know, I'm building a Track T with a fiberglass body. I've had a couple of off site questions about working with fiberglass so I'd like to offer some safety advice. When cutting or dry sanding Working With Fiberglass fiberglass, I always work outside and have my shop vac running with the hose at my work site. I wear a nose/mouth mask and a complete face shield for protection when cutting with a Dremiel. Finally, a pair of coveralls will help prevent dust particles from getting into your clothing and causing the dreaded itch. Remember, we're dealing with glass particles here and we don't want them in our clothing or in our lungs. These same precautions should also be used when working with resin Working With Fiberglass .

    Don't let these precautions make you shy away from working with glass or resin Working With Fiberglass .
    QUOTE QUOTE #1

  2. Don Garrett's Avatar Asst. Administrator
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    Good advice Rick, I work with the stuff and lead on full size cars......just because it's smaller scale is no excuse not to be careful. Kinda like playing Russian roulette with all six chambers loaded. YOU WILL LOSE!
    Last edited by Don Garrett; 02-20-08 at 06:24 AM.
    Grandpa McGurk.....Steppin' Large and Livin' easy.
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    QUOTE QUOTE #2

  3. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    I think I'm going to stay away from fiberglass. It's just a little too much of a hassle for me.
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #3

  4. Rick's Avatar Member
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    Jeff, I had similar concerns. But, after working with it a bit I'm comfortable. One thing I've learned is that this medium is extreemly strong and in the case of the T, it retains its shape and strength after cutting. Also, when cutting with a Dreimel or sawing, some mediums tend to chip or crack. Not so with fiberglass. In any event, we need to think safety no matter what medium we use.
    QUOTE QUOTE #4

  5. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    You're right about the safety factor with all materials. Since my main work area is in a basement where the ventilation is not that great, and since that is where my power tools are set up, I wonder if I can still do that with some safety. It's definitely not a fear of working with the stuff, it's more of an "I can't relocate my workshop to a better location" kind of thing. Any advice on that? Thanks in advance.
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #5

  6. Don Garrett's Avatar Asst. Administrator
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    Don't panic Jeff or relocate, wear a dust mask, eye protection, long sleeve shirt and those cheap surgical gloves. I'm not bothered by the itches but I do wear a painters mask and eye protection. Wash your hands when you are done and vacuum up the dust....you'll be fine, if you are still concerned....wear coveralls to keep the dust off your clothing. My wife usually takes the shop vac to me when I try to come in from the shop...hee, hee.
    The big thing with fiberglass is DON"T breath it, same with resin Working With Fiberglass . Besides, with a quality casting Working With Fiberglass you shouldn't be kicking up that much airborne dust anyway.....A TIP, hand sanding Working With Fiberglass doesn't put near as much residue in the air as power tools do, wet sanding Working With Fiberglass cuts it down even more.
    Grandpa McGurk.....Steppin' Large and Livin' easy.
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    QUOTE QUOTE #6

  7. slingshot's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Would it work to help keep the dust on if some kind of box was made with an attachment on one end for a shop vac to help pull in any dust from sanding Working With Fiberglass or cutting? Definitely still where all of the other protection including the coveralls, but just to help keep the dust down for inside the shop.

    When I was researching the net on fiberglassing, I ran across some stories were the little fibers had really bothered some people (they were pretty sensitive towards that stuff) and they found out that once the fibers get in fabric, they will stay in there even after washing except for silk. I stayed away from the fiberglass after reading all that stuff since I do my modeling in a small bedroom in the house, besides some ongoing health issues that I find are making me more and more sensitive to so many items used in modeling, my cat is usually up on the desk supervising my work and I don’t think the glass fibers would sit well with her either! Being able to work in the garage more would probably make a difference, but since it’s cold enough out that the penguins are frozen, I am looking at other alternatives, it’s bad enough not being able to spray paint all winter.
    QUOTE QUOTE #7

  8. Rick's Avatar Member
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    Lets not get in a panic guys. The bottom line is this...we need to be carefull with all mediums, especially when there is a possibility of breathing in dust AND fumes from glue and paint. Don and I have mentioned appropriate eye, nose, mouth and body protection and its all reasonably priced and in my opinion, a must have. If you are working inside make sure there's lots of ventilation, I've even had a fan blowing fumes and dust out a window. An easy way to control dust is to pull the vacuum hose off the floor sweeper and duct tape it, or the hose from the shop vack, to the workbench where you are doing your sanding Working With Fiberglass . Heck, I've even taped it to my leg when sanding Working With Fiberglass on my lap. I also use the vacuum when working outside and I've taped the hose to my wrist when useing the Dreimel. One final precaution, before you turn the lights out in the room or shop, give it a good vacuum. If you have a floor vent for the furnace or heat/air pump or leave a window open on a windy day, all that bad dust will continue to float around.

    Be safe, ventilate and use common sense and you'll be fine. Now, lets get back to building.
    QUOTE QUOTE #8

  9. Don Garrett's Avatar Asst. Administrator
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    Okay guys....time for a reality check here.....before chicken little starts running across the monitor yelling that the sky is falling. We've 'bout beat the safety thing to death and it's time to move on. Fiberglass and resin Working With Fiberglass are certainly no more or less harmful that the paint and adhesives you mess with hour upon hour.
    I've caused myself more harm with X-acto knives than I ever will working with resin Working With Fiberglass or fiberglass.
    If for personal health reasons you need to avoid them that's one thing other than that all that's really required to be safe is a little common sense. So let's put it in perspective. As far as I'm concerned they are a heck of a lot safer than eating at McDonald's!
    Grandpa McGurk.....Steppin' Large and Livin' easy.
    TDRinnovations.com
    QUOTE QUOTE #9

  10. Not to beat a dead horse guys just use the ol' noggin! I work with glass all the time now. Keep the vac. running and you will be fine!
    QUOTE QUOTE #10

  11. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Thanks for all the reassurance, you guys. I'd hate to turn down something really cool just because it's made of glass.
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #11

  12. Don Garrett's Avatar Asst. Administrator
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    Would you be concerned about driving a new or classic Vette? Many new car parts, hoods, side panels for step side pickups, front fenders etc. You just assumed it was metal. Those days are long gone....plastic and all sorts of composites and cast aluminum have taken their place......they are lighter and cheaper to manufacture, take a real close look at that PT of yours.....see how many parts a magnet will stick to.
    Now can we move on?
    Grandpa McGurk.....Steppin' Large and Livin' easy.
    TDRinnovations.com
    QUOTE QUOTE #12

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