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  1. Mario Lucchini's Avatar Super Moderator
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    Mario
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    Finally I discovered a high temp rare earth that withstands some 2500 ºC....

    Easy to find and mighty cheap, it's found where the ceramists buy their goodies....it's a mixture of 4 or 5 special sands that are mixed in some strange proportions, anyway, they sell it ready to use and already mixed....

    On the other hand, as metal, I'm using zamak Casting your own parts , which is a mixture of tin, lead and bismuth, and which has a melting point of about 300 ºC, it will melt with any household torch....I used a jewellers minitorch which works with lighter gas....by the way, this metal can be polished to a high shine and will keep it, can be painted, lacquered, tampered with, drilled, tapped, you name it!

    In a copper gas cap (Or any other suitable metal container), you put the sand Casting your own parts (Which comes moistened), and using any styrene Casting your own parts part of any kit you want to reproduce, you give the plastic part a shot of WD-40, blow out the excess and carefully press it into the sand Casting your own parts ...more carefully withdraw it...if you comitt an error you just reasemble the sand Casting your own parts and try again...

    This mould should be left to air dry at least 48 hours, melting metal on it with just any hint of moisture in it can lead to a most nasty explosion!...BEWARE and use gloves and goggles every time...

    Once the mould is dry, the torch is applied to the mould itself and you bring the metal bar until it melts and fills the mould....the mould gets red hot Casting your own parts in this operation and this ensures the metal will get in all the crevises....to enhance this effect, I give the mould some taps holding it with a small plier, on the surface I'm working on....

    Let this apart to cold naturally, it takes about 15 minutes (Depending on the mould's size)

    Now you can pry your part off the mould and the best parts begins....the cleaning, deflashing and polishing of your cast part.....Most rewarding!

    In pic 1 you can see the misterious mixture of sands...

    Pics 2 & 3 shows a mould ready to be used...

    Pics 4 & 5 shows the finished part once cleaned, polished, drilled and tapped ...

    Pic 6 shows the mini torch I'm using...

    And the last pics shows the part in use, in combination with scale hardware, turned aluminum part, attaching bracket, and else, reproducing a gasoline filter found on some Alfas of the era...
    This is to show that the mixing of scratchbuilt parts can give your model that different look and make yourself most happy....

    Mario
    Attached Images Attached Images Casting your own parts-c13-jpg  Casting your own parts-c1-jpg  Casting your own parts-c2-jpg  Casting your own parts-c3-jpg  Casting your own parts-c4-jpg  Casting your own parts-c11-jpg  Casting your own parts-c22-jpg  Casting your own parts-c23-jpg  Casting your own parts-c5-jpg  Casting your own parts-c6-jpg 
    Last edited by Mario Lucchini; 11-23-09 at 12:08 PM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #1

  2. sydeem's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Sydney
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    WOW - that is an impressive tutorial. You did forget to mention the name of the mysterious sand Casting your own parts

    "it's a mixture of 4 or 5 special sands that are mixed in some strange proportions, anyway, they sell it ready to use and already mixed...."

    Sounds like it is key to the process. Also when I looked up Zamak Casting your own parts - there are some 7 different varieties. I assume you are using Zamak Casting your own parts 2?
    Last edited by sydeem; 11-23-09 at 12:44 PM.
    Syd
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  3. 46SuperDeluxe's Avatar Active Member
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    Gary
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    I'm interested in finding out more about this molding product. From Art School and my early career with ceramic molds, I am pretty familiar with different ceramic clay mixtures. The temp range that you gave indicates probably a porcelain clay body which is a mixture of different clay bodies but primarily kaolin clay. I see that you are in Chile, and I'm wondering what I could find in California US that would be the same. In a foundry, sand Casting your own parts with a binder is used in the cope and drag process to cast,say, aluminum. But your product doesn't appear to be sand Casting your own parts but rather [I]plastilina ceramica[/I] or special ceramic mud that cracks and shrinks a little as it dries. Is this correct? Is it sold in the can as you pictured? Is it intended for casting Casting your own parts or for art projects? anything more that you could tell me about this would be appreciated. Thanks,- Gary
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  4. Mario Lucchini's Avatar Super Moderator
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    Mario
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    Quote Originally Posted by sydeem View Post
    WOW - that is an impressive tutorial. You did forget to mention the name of the mysterious sand Casting your own parts

    "it's a mixture of 4 or 5 special sands that are mixed in some strange proportions, anyway, they sell it ready to use and already mixed...."

    Sounds like it is key to the process. Also when I looked up Zamak Casting your own parts - there are some 7 different varieties. I assume you are using Zamak Casting your own parts 2?
    Hey Syd!
    After looking at the various Zamak Casting your own parts alloys I would say Zamak Casting your own parts 3 is the closest to the one I'm using....

    Good castings!

    Mario


    Casting your own parts
    QUOTE QUOTE #4

  5. Mario Lucchini's Avatar Super Moderator
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    Mario
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    Quote Originally Posted by 46SuperDeluxe View Post
    I'm interested in finding out more about this molding product. From Art School and my early career with ceramic molds, I am pretty familiar with different ceramic clay mixtures. The temp range that you gave indicates probably a porcelain clay body which is a mixture of different clay bodies but primarily kaolin clay. I see that you are in Chile, and I'm wondering what I could find in California US that would be the same. In a foundry, sand Casting your own parts with a binder is used in the cope and drag process to cast,say, aluminum. But your product doesn't appear to be sand Casting your own parts but rather [I]plastilina ceramica[/I] or special ceramic mud that cracks and shrinks a little as it dries. Is this correct? Is it sold in the can as you pictured? Is it intended for casting Casting your own parts or for art projects? anything more that you could tell me about this would be appreciated. Thanks,- Gary
    Hey SuperDeluxe!

    The ceramic sand Casting your own parts I bought is rather what you call "plastilina ceramica", which shrinks a bit when drying. It also cracks sometimes but very little.
    The guy who sells it here told me it has more than 6 components, but not even with a pistol at his head he was going to tell, hee,hee...

    It is very finely grained, so the mould resolution is very good in detail...

    They sell it to ceramists to make moulds that they put in the oven over 1000 ºC....
    That's all I can tell you....

    Other that it's very cheap, 500 grams of it costs here your equivalent of US $ 25.00
    ( 500 grams makes a LOT of parts)

    Hope this enlightens the subject a bit more...

    Cheers

    Mario

    P.S. The pics shows other parts made with this method...


    Casting your own parts
    Attached Images Attached Images Casting your own parts-pb230001-jpg  Casting your own parts-pb230002-jpg 
    Last edited by Mario Lucchini; 11-23-09 at 03:35 PM.
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  6. RC-Archer's Avatar Established Member
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    That's very cool!! I've done some small metal casting Casting your own parts using RTV Casting your own parts and lead free solder (aka silver solder)

    So what are those parts?
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  7. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Jeffrey
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    Outstanding. This looks ideal for my applications. The castings look perfect.
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
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  8. Switchback's Avatar Member
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    What about two part molds?
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  9. flamefink's Avatar Active Member
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    I have some parts this would be perfect for.

    Has anyone here in the US had any luck finding the "plastilina ceramica"? I've been searching google for a possible outlet but can't find any websites in english that make mention of it.
    QUOTE QUOTE #9

  10. RC-Archer's Avatar Established Member
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    Try here:

    Modeling Clays - BLICK art materials

    I'm still not sure WHICH clay would be suitable.
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  11. Mario Lucchini's Avatar Super Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by RC-Archer View Post
    Try here:

    Modeling Clays - BLICK art materials

    I'm still not sure WHICH clay would be suitable.
    I think non of those products withstands 2500 ºC...


    Casting your own parts
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  12. 46SuperDeluxe's Avatar Active Member
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    Gary
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    I'm sorry but i've misused the term plastilina ceramica. I thought this term meant literally "ceramic clay." My Bad! Plastilina modeling clay is not suitable for this application- it is not a ceramic clay. I ran a conversion on the temp range and its about 1800+F which is considered lowfire in ceramics. There are pottery clays in this range available at potters supply places in plastic bags that are sold ready to use. I guess as long as the clay is given time to dry, pouring Zamak Casting your own parts , white metal, lead, tin etc. into one of these molds would be similar to Mario's mold material since these alloys and metals all melt in the hundreds of degrees where these clays are intended to be fired in a kiln oven to over 1800 degrees or hotter which turns the clay hard like coffee cups and dinner ware. I have used a lowfire modeling clay for small sculpture. Does anybody remember ever making stuff for their parents in grade school or Indian Guides? I think the stuff that I used was from Laguna Clay Co. in southern Cal. but they distribute nationally. I was surprised when I saw Mario's post because I would never have considered using clay in this manner. But if it works- Wow. I'm not sure how a two piece mold would be made. Maybe put some kiln wash on the dry side then put wet clay onto it for the back side. The first side would probably absorb moisture from the second side and crumble though. Again- sorry for the confusion-Gary
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  13. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Keep up the great work, guys. Keep coming up with suggestions for this application. You can also look at a few dental lab supply companies that sell casting Casting your own parts investment. They're made to cast gold and metals that melt even higher than gold. They'll definitely stand up to the low fusing metals.
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #13

  14. Don Garrett's Avatar Asst. Administrator
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    Don
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    Good stuff Mario...this is basically sand Casting your own parts casting Casting your own parts or investment casting Casting your own parts .
    You guys may have better luck googling "sand casting Casting your own parts " or "investment casting Casting your own parts " instead of searching for the brand that Mario is using.

    Here' a sample of what I found.......
    PetroBond Foundry Casting Sand
    Grandpa McGurk.....Steppin' Large and Livin' easy.
    TDRinnovations.com
    QUOTE QUOTE #14

  15. ScaleMotorcars's Avatar Administrator
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    Ive used ashtray sand Casting your own parts and 30w motor oil with good results. No water to steam off so you can usually get a good casting Casting your own parts with fine detail and minor surface defects.

    Also Ive read that ground up cat litter is perfect for sand Casting your own parts casting Casting your own parts . Its made up of bentonite clay and if I'm not mistaken that's the same stuff used in most industrial sand Casting your own parts casting Casting your own parts .

    For for my 2 cents. Most pewter/lead/tin based metals melts under or around 400* so you can use a wide variety of materials. Regular old plaster and many RTV Casting your own parts rubbers are good for at least a few castings. Cast resin Casting your own parts wil work a few times but do it outside. Some release toxic fumes. Silicone chalking will work but keep the thickness to a minimum and use something like cast resin Casting your own parts or plaster as a backing for support. I could go on and on but you get the ideal.
    QUOTE QUOTE #15

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