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Yet Another Primer Question
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Yet Another Primer Question Yet Another Primer Question Yet Another Primer Question Yet Another Primer Question Yet Another Primer Question
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Results 1 to 13 of 13
  1. I just filled in all the screw holes on my Pocher Monza (to fill in the holes where I will leave off the wheel fenders, headlamps, right windshield, and the original engine mounting holes).

    So far I used a two part epoxy Yet Another Primer Question putty Yet Another Primer Question to fill in the hole for structure, then bondo spot putty Yet Another Primer Question and glaze (the one part red kind) to smooth the surface. I applied it in a very thin layer. Just sanded it off, noticed a little shrinking and cracking. I know I need to apply this stuff in thin layers - but before I apply another layer I wanted to check with the group (Im a little paranoid having just now read all of the previous threads on this forum on this subject)

    From what Ive read, it seems like this may be the wrong product, not react well with primer Yet Another Primer Question , continually shrink etc. Any advice here? - if this stuff if going to haunt me I can sand Yet Another Primer Question it all off before proceeding.

    Thanks !
    Chris
    QUOTE QUOTE #1

  2. ERA Chas's Avatar Active Member
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    Chas
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    First prime what you have now. Then use Evercoat Featherfill polyester catalyzed Yet Another Primer Question filler. (available at body shop supply houses). It sands perfectly and never shrinks. Reprime after sanding Yet Another Primer Question and use guidecoat to check for low spots.
    Chas
    QUOTE QUOTE #2

  3. Buildlarge's Avatar Established Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by ERA Chas View Post
    First prime what you have now. Then use Evercoat Featherfill polyester catalyzed Yet Another Primer Question filler. (available at body shop supply houses). It sands perfectly and never shrinks. Reprime after sanding Yet Another Primer Question and use guidecoat to check for low spots.
    Absolutly good advise since you have already used the products, you have!
    QUOTE QUOTE #3

  4. Thanks for the advise guys - Im sure I will get a good finish.

    My bigger immediate issue is I moved my engine back 5mm to correct the design flaws of the kit. I dont have a drill press - so the holes are in the right place but dont perfectly align with the mounted engine. In order correct it - I had to make adjustments and enlarge the holes.

    Now the holes are larger than the screw head itself. Do I buy larger hardware or do filler work here to make everything look flush.

    Uggh sorry for the rookie questions - by the way Buildlarge - Im going with Tamiya Yet Another Primer Question Hull Red for my finish color - I think its pretty close to the Bloodhound Red you were referring to - but in a spray lacquer Yet Another Primer Question - it finishes flat and Im sure i can polish it up to a nice semigloss.


    Yet Another Primer Question
    QUOTE QUOTE #4

  5. Don Garrett's Avatar Asst. Administrator
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    Don
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    Chris....I would plug the too large hole with solid plastic stock, either epoxied in place or plastic welded. Sand Yet Another Primer Question and re-drill the proper size hole in the correct location. If you put a band-aid on it at this point it will come back to haunt you, sooner or later.

    A little extra effort at this point will only make you a better, happier modeler in the long run.
    Grandpa McGurk.....Steppin' Large and Livin' easy.
    TDRinnovations.com
    QUOTE QUOTE #5

  6. ERA Chas's Avatar Active Member
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    Chas
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    Don's got you covered with the mount repairs but let me help with the paint job.

    A flat lacquer Yet Another Primer Question will be problematic to 'polish' to a semi-finish. You'll probably hurt the paint or at best it will be an uneven finish.

    Instead try this; Make a test piece of plastic primed as your body will be. Shoot the red. Get it flat so no sanding Yet Another Primer Question .
    Then mix Testors clear gloss (use lacquer Yet Another Primer Question ) with their Dullcoat about 50-50 and apply. If it's not the gloss level you wanted, adjust the mix ratio. Remember you're testing.

    OR- after the red, apply Future (an acrylic Yet Another Primer Question ) thinned about 25% with distilled water and see if you get the final look you want. The acrylic Yet Another Primer Question will not hurt the lacquer Yet Another Primer Question and it's a simpler procedure than the previous. The Future will layout and harden in a day. DO NOT rub or polish-that will be the final finish. If you get nibs in the Future you can remove with straight Windex and start over.

    Don't rush, just experiment until you get what you want.
    Last edited by ERA Chas; 08-12-09 at 10:22 AM.
    Chas
    QUOTE QUOTE #6

  7. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Jeffrey
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    Chris, I would definitely do as Don says. If you fill a hole with filler and then try to redrill your holes, all you get is bigger holes and crumbling filler. Believe me, I learned the hard way. You definitely waste way less time taking the time to do things right than patching and hoping things work out which they never seem to.
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #7

  8. Thanks for the tips - Im not married to the paint at this point so I will heed your advice there.

    The mount holes are the bigger issue - and as I expected there are no short cuts. I was thinking my best option would be to weld the plastic and redrill the mounting holes perfectly.

    What is the best way to do this for a solid structure ? Ive seen posts here about melting styrene Yet Another Primer Question to weld the holes or mixing acrylic Yet Another Primer Question lacquer Yet Another Primer Question with styrene Yet Another Primer Question as plastic filler.


    Yet Another Primer Question
    QUOTE QUOTE #8

  9. Don Garrett's Avatar Asst. Administrator
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    Don
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    Chris, I did the lip flapping about plastic welding and as far as I'm concerned it allows me to do permanent, non-shrinking repairs and construction. Geoff (whodaky) picked up this skill and has become quite a master at it. A work of caution...not all plastics are the same. Try to use the same type of plastic (scrap from the kit) as filler and practice first!
    There is a bit of a learning curve involved and I would hate for you to destroy a part that would be difficult to replace...practice before you tackle the real deal. Mixing scrap with lacquer Yet Another Primer Question thinner Yet Another Primer Question is time consuming and too many variables jump up.

    The biggest hurdle for guys trying to weld without practicing is warping or getting a bad weld....if you have no experience with it.....just grab some scrap and pull up a chair. Post your attempts.....good or bad and if you like we'll talk you through it.
    How's that?
    Grandpa McGurk.....Steppin' Large and Livin' easy.
    TDRinnovations.com
    QUOTE QUOTE #9

  10. Buildlarge's Avatar Established Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Don Garrett View Post
    Chris, I did the lip flapping about plastic welding and as far as I'm concerned it allows me to do permanent, non-shrinking repairs and construction. Geoff (whodaky) picked up this skill and has become quite a master at it. A work of caution...not all plastics are the same. Try to use the same type of plastic (scrap from the kit) as filler and practice first!
    There is a bit of a learning curve involved and I would hate for you to destroy a part that would be difficult to replace...practice before you tackle the real deal. Mixing scrap with lacquer Yet Another Primer Question thinner Yet Another Primer Question is time consuming and too many variables jump up.

    The biggest hurdle for guys trying to weld without practicing is warping or getting a bad weld....if you have no experience with it.....just grab some scrap and pull up a chair. Post your attempts.....good or bad and if you like we'll talk you through it.
    How's that?
    This does work and is the way to go, but it takes alot of practice and is one of those procedures that is not for the faint of heart. Use a scrape Yet Another Primer Question piece to practice on, practice, practice and practice some more. If you can master, then you now have a tool that is hard to beat in the construction of any type plastic. Another tip, the same, use plastic that the kit came popped in, chop up into small pieces, drop into Testors liquid glue, let the scrape Yet Another Primer Question melt in the glue, keep adding until it is a soupy goop. You now have a liquid plastic (same make-up of styrene Yet Another Primer Question ) to use as a putty Yet Another Primer Question . This is great for small fills. Is the best way I have seen to replicate weld beads.T:u*****
    QUOTE QUOTE #10

  11. Buildlarge's Avatar Established Member
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    Chris, here is a tip about moving the engine to the rear, closer to the firewall. While this is correct and a simple modification for a person to apply, it does have a draw back. A person must make a mask/diagram of the bolt holes for mounting the engine to the side rails of the frame. Just like you I struggled with this as well the 1st time I did and was stressed when the hole did not line up to the ones on the engine. What tangled webs we weave..........Here is the kicker to this. The only reason there is four holes is this is the method used to mount the engine into the car, and as a matter of engineering the number and size bolts were calculated to hold that monster motor in the frame @ full throttle. Now we are building a prototypical representation of this race horse, but alas she will never hit Hi-RPMs setting on that self. So after coming to that moment of insight, then why set-up all this work to get everything lined just so, drill press in hand and using your drawings, set about drilling 2 holes!!!!!!!!! Heres a tip, the screws as come with the kit are replaced with 00-90 Yet Another Primer Question , brass or you favorite flavor of bolts w/washers, tap engine mount on each side of the engine case, the front two. Now the secret is, these are more than enough to hold the engine in place, the rear two holes are drilled by hand, 00-90 Yet Another Primer Question bolts/washer, cut down and CA'd into place. Now you have 4 bolts holding the engine into mount. Paint the bolts color of frame. Or do the hard way, and as you have discovered, fill the holes, cross your fingers the filler will stay and do all over again. You will discover as you build Pochers, you will engineer more than one area, and no matter how many times you build the same subject, this is my I think 4th maybe 5th, and I have another in the wings, Alfa, and I have never built one the same yet. Always finding better ways.T:u*****
    QUOTE QUOTE #11

  12. Thanks for all of the tips ! Im excited to practice some new techniques this weekend (both plastic welding and using scraps in liquid cement). Part of the fun here is solving engineering/ design problems - much much different than wooden ship building.

    Buildlarge - thank you - dont know why I didn't think of using only two bolts to mount and simulate the rear one. Life will be much easier this way. I know I do need to fabricate a front mount extension - thanks for the heads up though. I chose a 5mm move back to not upset the rest of the parts too much. We shall see.

    Ill keep you guys posted - really appreciate all of the advice in getting this rookie thru his first Pocher.


    Yet Another Primer Question
    QUOTE QUOTE #12

  13. Buildlarge's Avatar Established Member
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    I just take some shim stock or flat aluminum sheet, cut a square, drill holes in the front/rear that match the engine and where motor mounts to the front of the frame, bolt the assembly up and paint the color of the chassis. I have never seen the front engine cover extended on a 2300, but have seen engine mount plates!Rick
    QUOTE QUOTE #13

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