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  1. Deuces-wild's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Guido
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    This was sent to me by our buddy "Slingshot" Great "HOW TO" article!! with lots of pics!! Holy Smokes Recreation Read on!! If you guys want this thread moved elsewhere on the forum, let me know!
    Last edited by Deuces-wild; 06-01-09 at 12:45 AM.
    Be nice or else ~1~**
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  2. troppo's Avatar Established Member
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    Great link, thanks
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  3. Herman's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Great link. It really shows the process that needs to be done. Very well done by a non-professional.

    I must say, however, that I would have done some (small) things differently. (but hey, doing this kind of stuff is what I get paid for...Well, as a salesman actually. No messy hands, no smelly stuff).

    -1. Use bubble busters (ribbed plastic, aluminium or steel rollers which are really great to get rid of the bubbles trapped in the fabric or mat).

    -2. Consider using epoxy 1:1 body mold making . There are several gelcoats suitable for epoxy 1:1 body mold making resin 1:1 body mold making , and working with epoxy 1:1 body mold making at least is not that smelly. Just protect yourself very good from getting the stuff on your skin. Also makes for a lighter product.

    -3. On mold making: The guy said it as well: Make a cradle, which keeps the mold in shape, and which allows you to tilt it sideways. Great for working in it, and also helps minimising floor space when the thing is not needed.

    -4. Create locator pins or dimples in the flanges. Can easily be done by pressing marbles into the clay flange.
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  4. Deuces-wild's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Guido
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    Your right about using dowel pins for locaters Herm... That helps minumize core shift. It helps with repeatability. The reason I posted that is what if that proccess can be used on a much smaller scale???...... ;';;';
    Be nice or else ~1~**
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  5. troppo's Avatar Established Member
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    It can be used on smaller scales, its regularly used for 1/4 scale and with the right cloth and technique i dont see why it couldnt be used on smaller scales. There would be a limit though, a point where a multi part plug for vacuum forming would be better for detail, the plug could be made of fibreglass.
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  6. Herman's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Herman
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    I think this system is very doable, even up to the 1:24 scale, or even smaller. There is cloth as thin as 20 grams / m2 (ha! You do the conversion to imperial...) which will give a laminate thickness of perhaps 0,1 mm tops.

    In 1:8 I would recommend a laminate thickness of at least 1mm, which could be achieved by using a 450 gr.m2 mat with polyester, or 3x 300 grams cloth. (with epoxy 1:1 body mold making )
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  7. troppo's Avatar Established Member
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    Great info herman thanks, i`m only used to working on industrial/transport type fibreglass.
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