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Long Range Project
Goal amount for this year: 518 USD, Received: 415.00 USD (80%)
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  1. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Kenneth
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    This is what may be my next car build when I have nothing else to do. This is the 1962 Lightweight E-type of which the factory only built 22 in total. The last of which was found in a garage in California that was originally purchased by a Lockheed test pilot. He was in the process of upgrading the rear brakes when he was killed in a test flight. His wife just closed and locked the garage door, the car was still on jack stands with the rear wheels off. She died, the kids inherited the house with dad's "old dusty European sports car" in the garage. One at least had the sense to remember that it was a Jaguar and called the local dealer to check it out. Keep in mind all the other cars were accounted for except the missing #22. The dealer knew it was a Jaguar but not sure year or model so called a Jaguar expert to confer. Upon seeing the car the the expert had an accident in his pants and could not believe what he was looking at. It was the "missing #22". The car sold and went back to England for a full renewal; not restoration and sold at auction for over a million dollars. The body is all aluminum and as part of the authentication process a small area of paint was carefully stripped from each major panel to verify 100% that it was aluminum; the spots are still in place and now part of the story. I have posted pictures in my Gallery under Jaguar XKE for reference. This is the original Low Drag Lightweight design; other references to lightweight E-types usually means that body panels have been replaced with aluminum ones such as the bonnet, doors, deck lid or in the case of Dunford, they will build the entire body but the rear view is not the same. They have the roadster top that helps to strengthen the body for racing.

    Ever wonder what influenced the Stingray design.

    This would be a great home for a TDR Long Range Project Jag engine.

    Enjoy! Ken
    [/url]
    Last edited by xken; 01-28-11 at 07:04 PM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #1

  2. The creative explorer's Avatar Established Member
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    Erik
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    Interesting, I will be following you. I have plans for myself to build the #5 Lindner/Nöcker car. Which is most similar to this one, except for a few details.

    I do want to disagree about the 'original lightweight design', as far as my knowledge goes, the lightweight story started by the low drag coupe's. Then the 12 (my references only mentione 12) lighweight cars would've been convirtibles. Later on, like #5, they have been modified from a convirtible to this design with the rivited bodypanels.
    QUOTE QUOTE #2

  3. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Kenneth
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    The Creative Explore; My source is The Jaguar Journal, published quarterly by Jaguar so I am sure they got their facts correct. But then again they are British. I am always skeptical about any information regarding E-types since there is now so much counterfeiting of cars by taking coupes and converting them to roadsters because the OTS's are twice as valuable. Last count their are 25% more roadsters in the world than were originally built. There is a whole industry out there making bogus cars by converting junkers. I have had my E -type 876529 since 1979 and checked by the Jaguar Heritage Trust and have received from them the Certificate of Authenticity and the original build info on the car which you can see in my Gallery. There is also a great deal of confusion on the early cars being called semi lightweights by maintaining the original steel mono coupe and replacing all the other parts with aluminum ones as I mentioned above. There is and old adage of "buyer beware" I am also a firm believer of "Researchers Beware" because I have run across so much bogus information being generated. Anyway regardless of how many were made it is still one of the all time classics even with a few flaws. Please if you have drawing and pics please post.

    There is no such thing as too much information that is good; the challenge is sorting out what is good and accurate.

    The one in the pictures I believe is a reproduction of Linder/Nocker's car being silver, the German racing color. Here is a link 1962/1 Jaguar E-Type Low Drage Coupé Lindner/Nöcker Coupe for sale: Anamera

    Ken


    Long Range Project
    Last edited by xken; 01-28-11 at 09:10 PM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #3

  4. rob8802's Avatar Active Member
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    Robert
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    Love the line's on this car,great color to.
    QUOTE QUOTE #4

  5. Mr Casual's Avatar Active Member
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    Michael
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    G'day xken, I beg to differ mate but the cars you are showing are "low drag coups", and the "lightweight" was built in '63 and only 12 were ever built with 1 being written off almost staight away. I'm currently half way though building a "lightweight" myself, but I'm a bit stuck on making the roof. Having seen your past builds I will be following this one very closely.
    Regards Michael, (aka mr casual)
    From the left coast of the biggest island on the planet.
    Living the life on the left coast of the big island down under.
    QUOTE QUOTE #5

  6. The creative explorer's Avatar Established Member
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    Erik
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    Mr Casual; that is incorrect. The pictures Ken shows, are either from a replica of the Lindner/nöcker Lightweight (#5) or from a #22 car.
    But this kind is based upon the lightweights. Actually, there was only one low drag coupe made and that is the Cut7



    QUOTE QUOTE #6

  7. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Kenneth
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    Glad to see confusion still reins; the car in the photos is a replica of the Lindner/nöcker Lightweight built by Lynx and offered for sale. Below is the link to the Lynx site and they imply 12 of this lightweight were built, read the text on page 3 it refers to their re commissioning of the missing car found in Los Angeles.

    I will admit that it is very easy for whomever wrote the original article could have easily hit a 2 instead of a 1 when writing. Also in checking around their were around 20 - 25 later factory lightweights of the style referred to by Mr. Casual. So the term "lightweights" was used early on for aluminum cars and then came the "semi-lightweights". The mid engine race cars basically obsoleted the E types that were no longer competitive. The Ferrari and Ford GT 40's were the way of the future.

    Lynx also restored the original wrecked Lindner/nöcker Lightweight (#5) they have posted pictures of the wreck as well as their finished work.

    E-Type | Lynx Motors

    Mr. Casual tell me more about what you are doing regarding the top. The original clamp on hardtop for the OTS was made of Fiberglas and available as an option from the factory. The OTS body tended to flex which is why most of the race cars were coupes. In fact a good restoration shop will cross brace the OTS body before disassembly due to the flexing caused by the cars own weight. Without cross bracing to maintain position the doors may not fit back where they can from.

    There are a couple of companies including Lynx that offer replicas of early Jaguars; 5o years from now the resale market will be very interesting.

    Ken


    Long Range Project
    Last edited by xken; 01-29-11 at 06:38 AM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #7

  8. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Kenneth
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    Here is the [B]"Lightweight"[/B] not the [B]"Low Drag"[/B]. Note the separate top which was originally made of Fiberglas with a glass window. For racing the window was replaced with lighter Plexiglas (perspex).



    Ken


    Long Range Project
    QUOTE QUOTE #8

  9. 3.Star's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Michael J.
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    Hello Ken,

    like already mentioned in former threads, I was so lucky to have the famous "Rosso-Bianco" Collection located in my hometown. The owner, Mr. Peter Kaus, bought the wreck of the Lindner/Nocker Racing Jaguar and intended to rebuilt it, but destruction was too heavy. So Kaus ordered a perfect clone of the Jaguar at Lynx. After the project was finished, his first plans were, to exhibit this replica next to the damaged wreck, but changed his mind, because of respect for Lindner/Nocker, dying in the Monthlery race. So only the Lynx Jaguar went into the museum and the remains of the crashed car were buried in the workshop of the Museum. I had the honour to meet Mr. Kaus several times in business affairs and was even allowed to take a seat in the exhibited Jaguar, which was one of my favourites in this impressing Museum.Now adding a link to the history of this car, which is very similar to the one you're intending to build. Jaguar Model Club

    Yours
    Michael
    Last edited by 3.Star; 01-29-11 at 07:31 AM. Reason: bad english
    QUOTE QUOTE #9

  10. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Kenneth
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    [B]3star [/B]Great article that says it all. Still a great looking car well ahead of it's time for a brief period. Thanks for posting.

    Ken


    Long Range Project
    QUOTE QUOTE #10

  11. 3.Star's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Michael J.
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    But...this specification had just one car, Sorry

    Michael
    QUOTE QUOTE #11

  12. The creative explorer's Avatar Established Member
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    Erik
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    Quote Originally Posted by 3.Star View Post
    The owner, Mr. Peter Kaus, bought the wreck of the Lindner/Nocker Racing Jaguar and intended to rebuilt it, but destruction was too heavy. So Kaus ordered a perfect clone of the Jaguar at Lynx.

    The article doesn't match the above. As what I know from my reference material, the original Lindner/Nöcker car has been restored. With the components that were salvagable and one of 2 spare body's.

    Raced at Montlhery 1964 – Crashed fatally.
    Damaged car bought by Philippe Renault.
    Bought by John Harper.
    Bought by Guy Black ( then of Lynx Motors ).
    Bought by Howard Cohen.
    Restored by Lynx Motors, using a spare monocoque obtained from the Works and almost all of the original mechanical components, and many repaired original body panels.
    Sold via Lynx Motors to Peter Schack of Germany.
    Bought by Peter Kaus of Germany for his Rosso Bianco Collection.
    QUOTE QUOTE #12

  13. Mr Casual's Avatar Active Member
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    Michael
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    G'day xken, my final referance scource is "Cat out of The Bag" by Peter D.Wilson, mainly because he actually was there, and we have met with him on more than one occassion.
    As for the roof, well I have tried a few things but with no success as yet, my current plan of attack is to shape a block of balsa and then form a styrene Long Range Project panel over that.
    I'm using the scale drawings I made as some token ref, if you have a better way please share.
    Kind regards Michael. (Sorry, still trying to post pics)
    Last edited by Mr Casual; 01-30-11 at 06:57 AM.
    Living the life on the left coast of the big island down under.
    QUOTE QUOTE #13

  14. 3.Star's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Michael J.
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    Maybe I'm wrong. Just relying on Mr.Peter Kaus. But does it make sense, to use torn and twisted parts of the aluminium body, when you're replicating most of it? They must be masters to recreate the structure and strenght of the material again to get this cat back on the road and track again. Just tried to help a little...won't do that nevermore

    Bye
    Michael
    QUOTE QUOTE #14

  15. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Kenneth
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    Mr. Casual, here is the best reference picture I could find in my resources, most are smaller images. This one is a good side view. As for your pattern I would suggest using basswood rather than balsa. Also glue two equal sized pieces together to give you a constant centerline for reference as you carve the shape. Another technique to try is very thin fiberglas/epoxy build. This would be a very easy layup. These original tops by the way are rare as hen's teeth.

    Ken




    Long Range Project
    QUOTE QUOTE #15

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