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  1. shaun_antony's Avatar Member
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    shaun
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    Hi, I'm wanting to make a scale replica vw beetle floor pan,
    I am struggling to decide what material for making the floor pans as they have many grooves to recreate.
    I have so far tried 0.3 brass sheet but this has proved too thick and will not form with ease.
    I have attached a picture of what I intend to create.
    Many thanks shaun
    QUOTE QUOTE #1

  2. Egon's Avatar Moderator
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    egon
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    I think you need a pressure form, top and buttom, press the sheet between these molds. So how to make a strong mold that can take the pressure, 3D print perhaps. Good luck. What scale is it.
    QUOTE QUOTE #2

  3. Jo NZ's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    I woulds also anneal the metal first. Copper is softer than brass
    QUOTE QUOTE #3

  4. shaun_antony's Avatar Member
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    The scale is 1/3 so the grooves fork out at 5mm deep 10mm wide.
    The way I had tried to form them was using a hard roller then a blunt scribe.
    What will annealing do?
    Thanks
    QUOTE QUOTE #4

  5. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    Hello Shaun,

    What scale? -and- what tools do you have to work with? Take a look at what Roger was able to do with his Continental's floor panels. His technique was conforming strips squeezed into a hollow receiver. Pressure was supplied with a clamp. -a simple technique, and obviously very effective! He used Brass.

    Are you only interested in making the part of some metal? Copper and Aluminum are both very formable.

    This panel could be vacuum-formed .

    Or create your pattern, there are no under cuts, wax it and lay up fiber-glass.

    Lots of ways to go.

    If your panel is only viewed from one side? -you could simply build up laminates, Plastic strips glued to plastic sheet.

    -Don

    PS- Start with a pattern, mold one side, release that mold and pour a second side directly into the first, peal them apart, add a spacer around the perimeter of your molds, whatever thickness you desire, and pour casting Help brass or copper? resin Help brass or copper? into the cavity. A cast resin Help brass or copper? floor pan.
    Last edited by MODEL A MODEL; 02-19-19 at 02:42 AM.
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #5

  6. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    Sorry! We were both typing at the same time.

    1/3rd is pretty big.

    What material do you want to work with?
    Last edited by MODEL A MODEL; 02-19-19 at 02:49 AM.
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #6

  7. Jo NZ's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Annealing brass or copper means heating it to dull red and cooling it fast in water. It softens the metal.
    QUOTE QUOTE #7

  8. shaun_antony's Avatar Member
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    shaun
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    The overall size would be 100x50cm.
    I'd like to do a full brass build.
    I tried previously using a crudely made template to which I rolled and scribed the brass into but I couldn't get neat enough lines
    Thanks shaun
    QUOTE QUOTE #8

  9. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Hello again,

    Well for a full-on Brass build; this panel is probably the easiest to do. -the fenders! on a Volkswagen are another story!

    Assuming you have a saw or access to one, you could approach this as a simple pattern project. A hammer-form. Make a pattern of your panel, undersized, by the thickness of your sheet metal. Include a flat margin with your pattern, 30 mm or so. Registration holes for screws will go in this margin serving the double purpose of registering the sheet and as a clamping device to hold a flat frame . This frame should be level with the highest parts of your panels details.

    Cut a sheet of Aluminum or Brass, or Copper. Drill corresponding holes in it, and make a frame, also drilled. The frame can be of MDF, Plywood, or metal. The frame only covers the margin area, and provides resistance to the sheet as you proceed, and helps to keep the sheet flat.

    Make a sandwich of the above. And with a hammer, a light one, and some wood punches (Soften the edges of the punches), use a soft wood, and lightly start tapping along the raised surfaces, but only along the edges. Do not touch the center of any unsupported areas. Concentrate your attention to the edges of the raised parts of the pattern.

    Work in a quiet area, so you can listen to your tapping. You may also feel the resistance of the metal change, but your more likely going to hear the difference. At that point the metal has become work hardened and needs annealing. To continue working it risks the metal splitting. It has become fatigued.

    Annealing Brass or Copper is as Jo described, to anneal Aluminum, get it sooty and burn off the soot with a torch, the soot burns off conveniently at the annealing temperature for Aluminum.

    Return your metal to your Hammer-form, screwing the frame and sheet in the same orientation as before. And continue tapping. Slow and steady, only tapping along the edges.

    This is all a learning process, and you will probably waste a lot of metal and energy teaching yourself to do this. Check YouTube for Hammer-forming. And make smaller test samples of the basic shape and details, In addition to the wood tools, you can try rubber mallets, but you have more control with the wood ones, which as your experience grows, you can shape them to fit your needs.

    A quick lesson is to find a pair of very large washers. Sandwich a disc of your chosen metal between the washers, clamp it to a sturdy table and tap it with the wood tools. This is the simplest way to understand what you'll be doing.

    Good luck!

    -Don

    PS- Perhaps make wood dowels into rectangles, not rounds. This will help locate the energy on to the areas where you want it, Think of them as wood chisel shapes, but with a flat surface like a punch, and soft edges are very important.
    Last edited by MODEL A MODEL; 02-19-19 at 11:27 AM.
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #9

  10. shaun_antony's Avatar Member
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    shaun
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    Thank you very much,
    I didn't intend on making the actual outer body,
    I just love the floorpan.
    Thanks for all your help and ill start a thread when I start making some good progress
    Shaun
    QUOTE QUOTE #10

  11. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    This is in fact a complex part to reproduce at scale 1:3. If you are looking into Google at what's needed to stamp a similar part as large as yours, you may notice that the press is developing tons of pressure!
    You may want to do a sample first with just one groove and see what happens to the metal. 0.3 mm is very thin for such a large part; imagine that I was using 0.4mm for my floor scale 1:12!
    QUOTE QUOTE #11

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