Close

Page 97 of 98 FirstFirst ... 92939495969798 LastLast
Results 1,441 to 1,455 of 1458
    1. Kit: Roger Zimmermann, by (Yearly Subscriber) Roger Zimmermann is offline
      Builder Last Online: May 2017 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/12 Rating:  (16 votes - 5.00 average) Thanks: 22
      Started: 05-17-12 Build Revisions: Never  
      Not Supported Scratch Built

      As stated in my presentation, I'm doing since 2 years a Continental Mark II, scale 1:12. Presently, I'm doing the floor; the trunk floor is ready. The next step is going towards the front by doing the floor under the rear seat. To spare metal and unnecessary reworks, I did first a model with cardboard. Now, it will be easier to cut the brass at the proper place.


      Continental Mark II
      Show Complete First Post

      Show Your Support

      • This build may not be copied, reproduced or published elsewhere without author's permission.
        Please note: The first post will be displayed at the top of every page.
    JOIN THE SMC ALLIANCE NOW

  1. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
    Name
    Roger
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    1,135
    No, Sebastian, it must not. However, with that manufacturer I'm sure there will be no negative reaction. Thanks for the links; I did not try to order because Markus has a good lead and will organise that for me. He has already used paint from that company and used Duplicolor primer Continental Mark II without negative effect.He means that there will be no trouble with shipping; let see what happens!


    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #1442

  2. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
    Name
    Roger
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    1,135
    Continental Mark II
    All I did to have nice negative molds for the front and rear windows was for nothing. I wanted to make the positive forms with wood, but as the temperature to shape the Plexiglas is rather high, I went with 0.8 mm thick brass. The piece of Plexiglas I used with the negative mold helped to find the correct shape of the mold by hammering (the brass, not the Plexiglas!) and bending. For each correction, I had to heat the assembly into the oven, take it out, put a towel over the Plexiglas to persuade it to take the shape of the mold, verify on the model if the shape was OK. I don’t remember how many times I did that play; I had almost the whole afternoon...
    Once the shape was satisfying, I cut a new piece of Plexiglas and the assy went again to the oven. To accelerate the process, I used a higher temperature: about 165°C. It was too much: the Plexiglas’ surface began to deteriorate and stick to the brass. By heating that piece again at 150°C, it was like magic: the surface was again OK!
    After maybe 4 or 5 “in, out”, the shape was OK and I trimmed the excess material.
    Then, I modified the front mold for the rear window. I was labor intensive as the profile is not flat but it’s following the shape of the roof. Finally, the shape was more or less OK and I began the same process as I did for the windshield. The sole difference is that it went quicker.
    On the picture, the windows are just put into the aperture; finally they will be glued to the body. The form for the rear window is in front of the body.




    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #1443

  3. blade's Avatar Member
    Name
    Anthony
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    2
    Excellent work. Again, excellent work.
    QUOTE QUOTE #1444

  4. PaulPK's Avatar Active Member
    Name
    Paul
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    19
    Kit
    Roger Zimmermann
    Wow, excellent. You pulled that off just fine.
    Got a question regarding solders. Is it ok to use a rosin core solder?
    QUOTE QUOTE #1445

  5. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
    Name
    don
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    61
    Kit
    Roger Zimmermann
    La cerise sur le gateau!

    Very nice! Perseverance is the word to describe you! I expect to see your picture in the dictionary! -Don
    QUOTE QUOTE #1446

  6. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
    Name
    Roger
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    1,135
    Quote Originally Posted by PaulPK View Post
    Got a question regarding solders. Is it ok to use a rosin core solder?
    Thanks for the comments!
    Sorry, Paul, I don't understand the question as I don't know what is a rosin core solder...Sometimes, when faced with something new or unusual, tray it with scrap material.


    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #1447

  7. PaulPK's Avatar Active Member
    Name
    Paul
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    19
    Kit
    Roger Zimmermann
    Thanks for the reply. That type of solder is used for electronics and has a flux built in. I wasn't sure if long term it would affect a painted finish and thought you might have experience using it.
    QUOTE QUOTE #1448

  8. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
    Name
    Roger
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    1,135
    Now I understand! I'm using only that for soft soldering. Of course, the flux must be cleaned before painting!


    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #1449

  9. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
    Name
    Roger
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    1,135
    Continental Mark II
    A few days ago, I was satisfied with the windshield. When I began with the windshield moldings, it was another matter: if the shape at the bottom followed rather well the body aperture, it was a different matter at the top. I realized that it would be impossible to glue the Plexiglas on that narrow flange to keep the desired shape; I had to improvise! First, I took the negative form back from storage and attempted to correct the windshield shape. This time, the mold was useful and I could correct at about 50% the upper shape. As I had enough space, I did a channel to force the Plexiglas in the shape I wanted. This channel was then soft soldered to the front drip molding. During the final assembly, that assembly will be glued to the body.
    For the picture, I installed the lower molding; I had to insert the wipers to stabilize the molding. As you may see, the underground is a technical drawing; it shows the windshield and cowl cut at the centerline.



    Now, I can do the molding for the back window.

    Last week, I went to a body shop to choose paint with a lower metallic Continental Mark II content than my previous experiment. I saw a VW paint called Laserblue. Further, I got the sample from a Mark II forum, Barry Wolk. The paint he used is very similar to a paint Opel used on an Insignia model: Olive Tree Continental Mark II . I went to a store selling Duplicolor paint. In their catalog, none of “my” paint was mentioned…The salesman said that maybe the dealer from each manufacturer could supply the paint. I went to the Opel dealer, about 300 meters away. Olive Tree Continental Mark II : no more available, super!
    As I had enough, I did not go to the VW dealer. Instead, I searched in Internet for both paint. I found them, available without problem. Of course, I did not read the complete text and ordered, paying with PayPal. Then, I saw that it was just a little bottle for touch-up! Too late, it was paid…I got those bottles on Monday; they are coming from…Turkey!
    About simultaneous, Markus from this forum saw my problems with the paint; he said that he is near a paint shop and they can do a spray can. I wrote that I was interested, but he may have difficulties to send the paint abroad (Markus is in Austria). He said there must be no problem; so the paint was ordered. He sent it early this week; I got both spray cans today, thank you Markus! I had to make a test, of course…
    On the pictures, you see one engine part on the sample from Barry; the paint is a tad darker, but it’s OK, especially due to the fact that I was ready to paint the engine gold! The blue sample (sprayed on the rear window form) is difficult to photography; therefore I did various pictures with a different light. As I just have one can, I spared and sprayed a very thin coat. With more paint, the result will be a bit darker.








    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #1450

  10. markus68's Avatar Established Member
    Name
    Markus
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    167
    It was a pleasure Roger. Windshields are excellent. Markus
    QUOTE QUOTE #1451

  11. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
    Name
    Roger
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    1,135
    Continental Mark II
    The paint is on the back burner. I’m waiting for another rattle can and I’m looking at each nice blue car to see if the metallic Continental Mark II content is fine or not…I will surely dream about that!
    In between I began the belt molding. Instead of the 4 pieces on the real car, I will do just one, from 4 elements silver soldered.
    To have a chance of a reasonable alignment, I intend to silver solder 6 locating pins. I did first holes into the molding (at that moment still in two parts), attach with glue each molding to the body and drill holes. Nothing special about that with one exception: the chuck from the drilling machine is too large; it will rub the roof before the drill bit will begin the holes. I had to find a solution. The first image is showing how I did it. The next problem: the holes near the centerline of the car are too far away for the machine; I had also another solution to overcome this problem; it can be seen on the second picture.
    In between, both halves have been soldered and the molding has now its correct profile.






    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #1452

  12. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
    Name
    Roger
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    1,135
    Continental Mark II
    Did today the upper molding for the rear window; it went better than anticipated; maybe I had less distractions today. The upper molding was done in 2 pieces and silver soldered in the middle once the correct dimension was attained. Of course, lower and upper moldings must be trimmed and polished for plating, they are just rough now.
    Unless I’m forgetting something, the outside moldings are done. I still have 4 parts to do: the door’s sills (again with X thousand dots) and both garnish moldings at the B pillar. Due to the tight clearance between door and pillar, I’m not sure if I will succeed. We’ll see.




    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #1453

  13. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
    Name
    don
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    61
    Kit
    Roger Zimmermann
    Mr. Zimmermann- You'll succeed! Nothing has defeated you yet! -the only down side to all this work, is how easy it might be for the uninformed to accept what you've done, without appreciating how much time, effort, expense, and skill you've invested. I guess its up to the rest of us to educate any who'll listen.

    I have directed more than just a few friends and acquaintances to this forum.

    (An aside) -a few weeks back you said that you did not want to do another brass bodied model? Seeing your interest in American cars, are you hinting at doing a Corvette? A Split window Vette sitting next to your Avanti and Toronado wouldn't look out of place! (Be forewarned, that even if you do, I will continue to keep it on my list !) (A '63 or '67)

    Thank you for sharing~ -Don
    QUOTE QUOTE #1454

  14. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
    Name
    Roger
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    1,135
    Don, I'm sure that I can do that part. The problem is the clearance with the door. I have to work with 0.1mm brass. The door is getting the same chromed part (already done) and if I'm gluing Continental Mark II that part to the door for clearance checking, I cannot remove it for plating without damaging it!
    We'll see. For the moment, I'm trying the sills.
    There will be no other model once this one is ready. Why? There are several reasons: usually, when a new project is in the air, I have the tendency to do it better than what I did before. Usually, better means more time to spend. Can I begin a complex project with 75 or more? Fortunately, nobody knows when our time is coming...Then, with the actual project, I can do almost nothing else. I recently bought a "new" old car; there are some work to do on it but I don't have the time for that, therefore I let do it in the US before the car will be shipped to Europe. I have mixed experiences with US repairs; I hope that I will be not too much deceived!
    Sure a '63 Corvette would be nice to have in 1:12; or a 1957 or 58 Chrysler New Yorker, I love those rear fenders/fins. Convertible. With functioning folding top. It's just a dream!


    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #1455

  15. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
    Name
    don
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    61
    Kit
    Roger Zimmermann
    Mr. Zimmermann!

    Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo both lived and worked into they're 90's! And for myself, I just turned sixty. So, having told everybody that I will stay around for another sixty! I had better get started on some of my projects! (for as I figure it, I am at that peak with only downhill left?)(Maybe I'll push that number to 130?)

    So? So expect to see something from me in the next weeks. I've dug out my boxes of research and will restart the 1/4th scale Model A Ford Pick-up.
    Also on my short list is a Honda CB77 SuperHawk 1/4th, and a Bugatti Type 53 (which also uses a Type 50 engine), 1/6th scale.

    I never suspected that you were a "Fin-man"? The New Yorkers are very classy, and would make wonderful stablemates for your growing collection!

    As always thank you for sharing. -Don
    QUOTE QUOTE #1456

Similar Threads

  1. Micro Mark Digital Readout question
    By Ctype in forum Scale Model Machinist
    Replies: 7
     : 10-24-12, 10:54 AM
  2. Replies: 0
     : 09-04-11, 08:40 PM
  3. Micro Mark Sale
    By Ferrari-Cobra in forum Getting Started
    Replies: 2
     : 08-30-06, 03:37 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Top