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    1. Kit: Roger Zimmermann, by (Yearly Subscriber) Roger Zimmermann is offline
      Builder Last Online: Nov 2017 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/12 Rating:  (16 votes - 5.00 average) Thanks: 23
      Started: 05-17-12 Build Revisions: Never  
      Not Supported Scratch Built

      As stated in my presentation, I'm doing since 2 years a Continental Mark II, scale 1:12. Presently, I'm doing the floor; the trunk floor is ready. The next step is going towards the front by doing the floor under the rear seat. To spare metal and unnecessary reworks, I did first a model with cardboard. Now, it will be easier to cut the brass at the proper place.


      Continental Mark II
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  1. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    Continental Mark II
    Just for you, Tom: the letters are made from a strip 1mm wide and 0.3mm thick (0.04" x 0.01"). The strip is about 20mm long (les than 1") and it is soft soldered on a thicker strip from the same width to have some rigidity during milling. The picture is showing what I means; a "N" letter was just removed:



    This assembly is then squeezed in the vice. In the case of the N letter, I just cut a bit each side into the metal to have a straight line. Maybe the pictures can help for the comprehension:





    As you see, I did each time two letters. The milling cutter is 0.2mm thick, just what I needed to make the E letter; I used it also for the other letters by moving down the milling cutter a bit each time until the gap was large enough. For example, when I did the "C", I did one cut and then 2 other cuts of 0.2mm each, creating an aperture of 0.6mm.
    When the letter was shaped, I did a cut at the end of the letter but just a bit more than the thickness of the letter. Then I removed the assembly from the vice, went to another vice to have a more confortable position, heated the back with a small soldering iron and took away the letter with a tweezers. From then, the handling of each letter is more difficult but it can be done. The remaining letter on the thick strip is eliminated and there is fresh metal to do another letter until the strip is too small.
    I hope you will more or less understand my explanation due to my limited English...


    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #1382

  2. PaulPK's Avatar Active Member
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    Roger Zimmermann
    Roger, your English is fine and the process you explained is very helpful. "A picture is worth a thousand words"
    thanks,
    Paul
    QUOTE QUOTE #1383

  3. RAT23's Avatar Active Member
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    Hi roger,
    thanks for posting the pics & info on these letters, it explains quiet a bit. I never would of thought to solder the thin pieces to a thicker piece, do you use an iron for all your soldering?
    QUOTE QUOTE #1384

  4. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Quote Originally Posted by RAT23 View Post
    Hi roger,
    thanks for posting the pics & info on these letters, it explains quiet a bit. I never would of thought to solder the thin pieces to a thicker piece, do you use an iron for all your soldering?
    Yes, the thin material is soft soldered with a iron. Same iron is used to heat the thicker material to remove the letter. It must be done quickly to avoid that the solder is flowing into the milled details.


    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #1385

  5. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Continental Mark II
    As the weather was almost like spring time, I could do the positive shape for the headliner. As the polyester has to cure Continental Mark II one or two days, I began the emblems located on the front fenders. Each part is done with 5 separate elements silver soldered.
    Here is a picture from the real part:


    My interpretation. I’m just wondering how I will polish that…




    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #1386

  6. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    It does not happen a lot, but this time I don’t know how further: thanks to the mild weather we had recently, I could “cast” the headliner shell. After trimming, it goes into the roof, but the fitting is not perfect as I removed here and there too much material.
    Initially, I had the idea to use off-white satin to represent the headliner. That material is very thin; probably by applying cement on the shell, the glue will go through the satin (more from it later). To avoid the problem, I imagined cutting the shell into 7 segments at the lines which are figuring the suspending wires and glue the material from behind. I anticipated following problems: the alignment of each panel may not match the next panel exactly; the satin must be cemented on the roof at the sides, not at the shell. That cemented satin on the side could be pushed back when I will attach the side and front brass molding, ruining the headliner. OK, I could try and in case of catastrophic failure redo another shell. Misshapen are sometimes there to find a better solution; I prefer however to avoid waste.
    The next solution would be to install definitively the shell into the roof and cement the satin directly on it. I tried this morning to spray some “Display mount” from 3M; as expected, I had the fingers full of that stuff which go through a thin cloth very easily.
    The other solution I see is the use thin leather for the headliner. Not quite correct, but who is looking at the headliner from a scale model?
    Maybe one of my readers has a solution I could use…






    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #1387

  7. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger Zimmermann
    Mr. Zimmermann! Hello! I have had this very same problem a few times over the years! Frustrating isn't it? -A quick and good fix with over trimming is to make sure that the headliner is indeed over trimmed and that your part wont be die-locked before you need it to be. - If you do not need that extra wiggle- room then remove the headliner and wax the areas that are exposed, that is wax the brass roof, auto wax is ok, mold wax better, sand Continental Mark II the area of the headliner (the polyester part), to give it "tooth" and mask off around the offending gap. Return the headliner to its place And now mix up a small batch of your resin Continental Mark II , adding to it the dry powder of sanded resin Continental Mark II (you'll need some of this handy). Apply this mixture, it should have the best results. Body filler is not a horrible substitute, it does sand Continental Mark II well, but you'll probably have to "super-glue" it in place as it often will break off. -If you do want some gap, thin packing tape/transparent tape can be layed down methodically upon any area, waxed and continue as above. (The use of tape to create channels comes in handy for wiring and for controlling glue while bonding.) This may have to set for a period longer than the headliner did, because it is a small amount trying to cure Continental Mark II against a relatively large heatsink.

    As always, thank you for sharing with us and Good Luck! (What a wonderful model!) -Don
    QUOTE QUOTE #1388

  8. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Hello again! I've been out driving and thought to mention double stick tape? Most car badges are now "bonded" with double stick films/tape. And 3M does offer a tape that is rolled up in waxed paper, providing as you unroll it, the thinnest film of adhesive only. No carrier. The paper carrier helps in the handling of this material, but once placed the wax paper is then pealed away. -I believe that sheets of this kind of film are available to photographers? -I've also had good experience with 3M Super 77, and there are also spray cans of headliner adhesive. The secret is to use them as you use contact cement. A dusting spray, not wet, spray both surfaces (lightly), let them tack-up and then lay the fabric down. Do not do this inside the house! Nor in a breeze! And good luck!! Its not the easiest thing to do 1:1 Continental Mark II !!! -(Is painting out of the question? ) -Don
    QUOTE QUOTE #1389

  9. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Thanks Don for your suggestions. I got the double stick tape tip from another forum, solution I will try. I got also other suggestions which I was not thinking about.
    The dusting spray is another method I may try; painting is requiring a perfect shell which is not the case right now. Anyway, I will have in the next days something to try.


    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #1390

  10. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Continental Mark II
    To Don: glad my method could be used to create nice headlamp glasses! I'm just wondering where you got that Swiss Franc!

    I expected to have difficulties with the hood emblem: no deception here, I had some! First, I did a major mistake: I took 2 bits of brass, did a groove in the middle, and silver soldered them to have the star basis. All went well until I began with the outer square. If I silver soldered them, the whole star could come apart as the soldering was not 100%. I decided to soft solder it, knowing that the joint is very weak, especially with such small dimensions. I did a wider square, did slots until I could solder the assembly to the star. The principle is shown on the first and second pictures (but this is the second emblem); then, the excess metal has to be eliminated until the appropriate thickness is obtained. All went well until one part went away because the joint was effectively too weak. I tried to solder it and, during that process, 2 other parts said good bye! At that moment, I knew that I can do another star, this time with solid material. A new square was then silver soldered and the same process of eliminating the excess brass was performed like the first try. This time all went well; I could then soft solder the base of the emblem.





    As you can see on the last picture, the finished emblem on the right is at 90% OK: during the soft soldering, I missed the opportunity to maybe correct a little bit the outside square shape. Fortunately, when put on the hood, this misshapen is barely visible. Doing a third emblem is no guarantee that it will be better, therefore, I let it that way. The part on the left will stay that way as I had too many hours into it to throw it away.




    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #1391

  11. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Mr. Zimmermann, Thank you! -Beautiful file work! -Don
    QUOTE QUOTE #1392

  12. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Thanks Don!

    Some days ago, I bought some cloth. Not satin, but cotton. This afternoon, I experimented with that cloth with the adhesive can I found. Unfortunately, the can is too old; what came out is liquid and lump (if this is the correct word). Anyway, the first attempt is not too bad; I have to improve the lines and buy a new can. The cloth is not snow white; it should be ok with either white/blue trim or white/red trim.
    I still hesitate between a blue metallic Continental Mark II or anthracite outside color. Years ago, our stores had hundreds of spray cans; now maybe 20 or 30 generic paint are exposed. It will be a problem to find the right (for me) color.




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    QUOTE QUOTE #1393

  13. markus68's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    your emblem is a masterpiece. Markus
    QUOTE QUOTE #1394

  14. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Thanks Markus! However, as I noted, not perfect. Sure, once plated Continental Mark II and put on the hood, the slight misalignment at the bottom will hardly be noticed.


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    QUOTE QUOTE #1395

  15. markus68's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    what is the source material of the cross? Is it an elbow or is it filed?
    QUOTE QUOTE #1396

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