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    1. Kit: Roger Zimmermann, by (Yearly Subscriber) Roger Zimmermann is online now
      Builder Last Online: Oct 2019 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/12 Rating:  (17 votes - 5.00 average) Thanks: 25
      Started: 05-17-12 Build Revisions: Never  
      Not Supported Scratch Built

      As stated in my presentation, I'm doing since 2 years a Continental Mark II, scale 1:12. Presently, I'm doing the floor; the trunk floor is ready. The next step is going towards the front by doing the floor under the rear seat. To spare metal and unnecessary reworks, I did first a model with cardboard. Now, it will be easier to cut the brass at the proper place.


      Continental Mark II
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  1. JeepMkd's Avatar Active Member
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    Mite
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    I still haven't tried brass sheets, I've only worked with tubes and solid rods so far and I like it. As far as aluminum goes it is very easy to cut and shape, but the only reasonable way to join it is with CA glue Continental Mark II which is not strong at all.
    Recently I've started working with steel (0.3mm) and beside the fact that it is difficult to cut I love it! Rust begins to form almost immediatly and that's awesome.

    As far as the Continental goes, the build is awesome and I can't wait for the next update.
    QUOTE QUOTE #32

  2. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    The under the front seat's rail is easy looking, but it was not. It must clear the frame and drive shaft; it's also the anchoring points for the front seat. After some hours spent to that part, it's at least ready; this is the first picture. The aluminum fork is a pattern I used to form each side of the rail. I could not do another part; aluminum is not quite strong as a material! It led to drill the first holes in the frame to assemble the rail; I had also to do quickly some bushings to get the correct distance between frame and rail. This rather tiny part is a reference point for the rear part of the tunnel. However, to have a correct position of th e rear floor, I had to drill other holes in the frame.
    As neither the frame nor the floor are exactly like the original parts, I had to make some compromises as well as gentle hammering.
    Finally, the position of each respective assembly pleases me; I could modify the tunnel; it's no ready to get the surrounding parts, when they are done.






    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #33

  3. spinellid82's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    David
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    I am currentlt working on a brass chassis for a 1:12 69 Camaro, Isure do know what you mean baout "it looks easy"! I have done the front crossmemner three times now, third time is the charm... I hope! I'll be doing a new thread about it as sonn as I have enough to take pictureas and not be laughed out of the forum, LOL.
    USMC, Retired

    Evil prevails when good men stand idle.
    QUOTE QUOTE #34

  4. Dougritt's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Douglas
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    The step by step process is fun to read. Thanks Roger. I really prefer brass over styrene Continental Mark II because over time, the fillers Continental Mark II and glues used to join plastics begin to show through the paint surface...metals just seem more stable (and more expensive, unfortunately!)
    Last edited by Dougritt; 07-11-12 at 11:33 PM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #35

  5. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    Quote Originally Posted by spinellid82 View Post
    I am currentlt working on a brass chassis for a 1:12 69 Camaro, Isure do know what you mean baout "it looks easy"! I have done the front crossmemner three times now, third time is the charm... I hope! I'll be doing a new thread about it as sonn as I have enough to take pictureas and not be laughed out of the forum, LOL.
    That sounds interesting! From the design, the floor of a Camaro is more intricate than the one from a car with a complete separate frame.
    We have all to learn somehow. Look at what I did in 1963; it should be an Avanti frame! This frame was modified in 1965 and, at the end, a completely new frame was done in 2003-2004. The model it belongs is my avatar.




    Continental Mark II
    Last edited by Roger Zimmermann; 07-12-12 at 04:25 AM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #36

  6. spinellid82's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    David
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    Yep, gotta start somewhere. I did finally get the crossmember built and I have both front rails soldered to it. The chssis that I as trying to emulate is built by Heidt's, I am going to make the center section beefier ans it will not be an exact copy but the dimensions are accurate. This is what I am using as inspiration.

    Continental Mark II-tci-20eng_-2067-69-20camaro-2067-69-20firebird-2068-72-20nova-20frontclip-20-20rear-20suspens-jpg
    USMC, Retired

    Evil prevails when good men stand idle.
    QUOTE QUOTE #37

  7. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    David, is that a picture of a real frame? I suspect the original underbody from a Camaro is not looking like that as it was a unitbody with an engine cradle. What you are showing must be used in a kind of competition.


    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #38

  8. spinellid82's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    The unit in the photo is actually desinged to bolt to the unibody and replace the engine cradle without modification of the underbody itself. I started off with the idea of doing a back half frame and a 4link rearend then I figured why stop there. The front suspension will be spinde mount struts and rack and pinion steering with four wheel disc brakes of course. I will have to modify the underbody of the 1:12 Camaro but I am not doing anything that has not been done on the real car. I am shooting for a turly badass street car.
    USMC, Retired

    Evil prevails when good men stand idle.
    QUOTE QUOTE #39

  9. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    The first footwell is ready, well, almost: the front part must be trimmed to be mated with the part floor under the front seat.




    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #40

  10. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    There are 3 elements for the floor which are ready: the front part, the rear one and the small bit under the front seat. Now, the task will be to reunite all 3 together, with the hope that the car will not look like a banana!
    Obviously, the first step will be to trim the inner rocker panels to the proper length, then solder the front seat panel to the front floor element and trim the rear foot wells and under seat panel until they can be soldered together.
    Only then I will begin with the front tunnel.




    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #41

  11. AirB's Avatar Established Member
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    Rudy
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    Great work Roger, do have a Lincoln in your garage where you can take the measures, or do have so much
    documentation and pics about the car ?
    QUOTE QUOTE #42

  12. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    Quote Originally Posted by AirB View Post
    Great work Roger, do have a Lincoln in your garage where you can take the measures, or do have so much
    documentation and pics about the car ?
    First, this is not a Lincoln! Technically, Continental was a separate make in 1956 and 1957. Many people don't know that; I also had to learn it!
    From a man in the Mark II forum, I could get some technical drawings, but way not enough! Fortunately, I know a man living at about 15 km from my place who has 4 Continentals. That would be fine, unfortunately, the man is not always there and 2 of his cars are stored in a room without light; the other 2 are stored very near from each other, making very difficult to take dimensions from under. Furthermore, they are DIRTY! Not quite fun with a piece of paper, rule, pen and greasy hands...
    Than man has also a collection of spare parts in another building: engines, transmissions, steering gears, mostly from Linclolns from the same vintage. Most of these elements were used into the Continentals, so it's rather easy to get correct dimensions. Here again, everything is tightly packed and greasy, therefore sometimes almost impossible to approach.
    Of course, I have plenty of pictures, done at that place or found in Internet.
    By the way, I would never do a car I have in the garage...


    Continental Mark II
    Last edited by Roger Zimmermann; 07-17-12 at 11:51 AM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #43

  13. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Jeffrey
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    Wow, I had no idea that the Continental was a separate brand for a while. Just think of what you can learn here.
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #44

  14. funnybug's Avatar Member
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    Pablo
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    well, it was still a Ford product.

    Continental Mark II - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    QUOTE QUOTE #45

  15. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    Quote Originally Posted by funnybug View Post
    Should have written: ...a separate brand from the Ford Company! Due to low volume and planing changes at Ford, Continental was integrated into Lincoln at the end of 1957.


    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #46

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