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    1. Kit: Roger Zimmermann, by (Yearly Subscriber) Roger Zimmermann is offline
      Builder Last Online: Mar 2019 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/12 Rating:  (17 votes - 5.00 average) Thanks: 25
      Started: 05-17-12 Build Revisions: Never  
      Not Supported Scratch Built

      As stated in my presentation, I'm doing since 2 years a Continental Mark II, scale 1:12. Presently, I'm doing the floor; the trunk floor is ready. The next step is going towards the front by doing the floor under the rear seat. To spare metal and unnecessary reworks, I did first a model with cardboard. Now, it will be easier to cut the brass at the proper place.


      Continental Mark II
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  1. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    May 2012
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    As I had not right on hand the large stock needed to do the converter housing, I began with the transmission's extension. The main part is mostly done on the lathe, with some milling. As pictured below, the extension is practically finished, with the exception of holes for the rear mount and for the speedometer gear. I took a short cut: I id not a separate cover for the access hole to the governor; why? The answer is easy: the extension is well hidden by the frame; most of the work I did will not be visible.

    It's not quite the same with the converter housing: with a wide open hood, it can be seen. The people at Franklin Mint did spare here: there is just nothing after the engine on the Mark II model from this company, just the bottom is represented!

    The pictures are showing that housing while the part is not finished: the lower part needs some heavy work; the housing for the starter motor is to be done too.





    I noticed from the pictures I have from a real housing that the above part is more rounded than the lower one; I did the entire form on the lathe, then with a good file, I did the correct shape for the upper part.

    Today, October first, 2011, I could complete the torque converter housing. Some holes are missing, as well as the sheet metal parts (the cover at the engine's side and the duct for cooling). This small part is the assembly of about 15 pieces!

    I assembled it to the engine, together with the starter motor. It seems that I did my home work well; I had just a small interference between the engine block and the starter motor.





    I will continue now with the transmission's case, another nice casting Continental Mark II part!

    This time, I will try to show how many separate parts are needed to form a casting Continental Mark II with just flat brass. I'm showing the beginning: the flange of the case which attach to the converter's housing soldered to the bottom of the transmission and another picture showing the case (or what is done) to the housing.

    Up to now, the case is done with 4 elements.





    The rear flange was added to the case. As it was done with 2 pieces to show the details, we are now at 6 pieces and it's not yet obvious that it will be a transmission's case.






    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #2162

  2. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    May 2012
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    Some more parts added; it's more looking like a transmission than before...Now, it's time to decoration with the various raised castings. They will all be soft soldered. Parts count now: 10.



    I "quickly" added 8 parts to what is already done. This way, the RH side of the transmission's case is ready. It will be better looking with a little paint, but, obviously, it's too early...Parts count now: 18.



    Today October 10, I finished the LH side of the case. With the addition of 5 pieces, the total count is now 23 for a total weight of 12 grams (.4 oz).





    The next task will be the oil pan for the transmission. Unfortunately, I forgot to measure the depth while measuring the transmission and my pictures are no good to evaluate that. I hope that somebody from the Mark II forum will help again!

    With the exception of a few details which will be added later, the transmission is basically finished. I even sprayed some primer Continental Mark II on the main case as this part is really finished. The oil pan needs some cosmetic improvement as well as the oil refill tube; this part will be just inserted in the pan and fixed somewhere (I don't know yet where it is attached).

    The screws you can see are not all the definitive ones; I used what I had on hand.







    I will now do the front engine supports, assemble the transmission to the engine and drop the assembly on the frame. Maybe some rework will be needed; I don't know yet.

    The LH side is quite different and, less easy to do.


    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #2163

  3. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    major milestone will be when the engine can be positioned on the frame. This happened on October 17, 2011. As anticipated, there were some interference; the main one was between the exhaust collector and the steering gear. I have some pictures from the real car, but I cannot evaluate the distance between both elements.

    I tilted a bit the manifold (the flanges will no more correspond exactly with the ones from the block) and I lowered a bit the valve body. At the end, I have a gap of .5 mm (0.02").

    The other interference was between the oil pan and the second crossmember; a slight modification of the pan was the solution.

    As expected also, the alignment left/right and front/rear is not perfect as many tolerances are added up.

    Those imperfections will not be seen once the model is completed but I'm just unhappy that this happens...

    I will have to do a device to calculate exactly the distance between the top of the air cleaner and the top of the frame (which is called point zero). With a rough measurement, it seems that I will have a gap of .5 mm (again 0.02") between the air cleaner and the hood...Therefore, I must know exactly where I am to maybe modify some elements to get more clearance; 2 mm would be nice (0.08").









    '56 Mark II had an air cooling transmission. After the drive train was on the frame, I had to complete the transmission with those 2 sheet metal parts. I had enough pictures to understand the shape; anyway, I had to do 2 wood forms to shape the metal.

    As those parts are more or less ready, I cleaned them and gave a coat of primer Continental Mark II .

    Right now, I don't know with what I will continue: A/C compressor and brackets for it plus generator or front suspension. You will know soon!





    Before I'm tackling the lower front suspension arms, I finished the starter motor, add a little coat of primer Continental Mark II and installed it on the engine. Of course, all those installed parts will be removed for the final paint (When?).



    The clear spot on the oil pan is where I had an interference with the frame. This spot will be improved in due time.

    I decided to begin the front suspension, with the lower "A" arms.
    Those arms are taking more time as anticipated (sounds familiar!); the shape is odd, nothing is square. Anyway, some progress can be reported as you can see on the attached picture. On the left, one arm is temporary attached together with screws; the other arm is not assembled. On top, there are both parts I cut too narrow and are scrap.



    What I have to do is the form for the spring's bed; I will try to do it as a pressed part with brass and polyester dies. Maybe…

    To continue with the lower lever, I did a form for the spring bed with the intention to press a thin piece of brass between that form and the negative of it in polyester.

    While the polyester was curing Continental Mark II , I began the upper ball joints for the suspension. I checked what I did with the Toronado (I still have all shop drawings), choose the suitable balls and turned the studs for the upper and lower ball joints. This is on this picture; the lower balls are larger in diameter.



    The next picture is showing the balls silver soldered on the studs. On the same picture, there is a spare ball joint I still have for the Toronado.



    As the polyester would not cure Continental Mark II (probably too few droplets of hardener), I continued with the upper cases. This is again a cast part, more complicated to do as a sheet metal case...At first I wanted to do the case as simple as possible, but I realized soon that I could not partially close the case to keep the stud in place.



    After doing some special tools, I put some grease into the case, inserted the stud and then I squeezed the case with the tool. This action is bending a little bit the brass around the ball preventing it to go out.



    The last picture is showing both upper ball joints, lubed for life!



    The lower levers are now more or less ready. Missing are the rubber bumpers (they will be done at a later date) and some holes, as well as the welded nuts for the shock absorbers.

    The bed for the spring was pressed between two forms, one was in polyester. I was careful not to apply too much force on the vice as I was afraid the polyester would not resist. Indeed, I could do 4 pieces (2 were scrap) and the polyester broke the last time I intended to squeeze a bit more. Some more "tools" were necessary to form the parts; I have the impression they are good for that purpose.



    The "inner" side is not so good looking as the outside; when the model is completed, the inside of the arms will barely be visible.



    Now, it's time for the lower ball joints!


    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #2164

  4. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    Once the A arms were ready, I installed them on the frame.





    After the lower ball joints, it was time to do the spindles. This was a long affair as to see the progress I had to install each spindle on the suspension levers, install the drum/wheel assembly until the camber was right and the distance of the tire to the upper ball joint was more or less the same as the real car (12 X smaller, of course).

    Then, I had the problem to locate the spindle in relation to the suspension arms; fortunately, a member of the Mark II forum gave me the dimension I asked.

    The spindles are not the exact replica of the real parts; I had to suit them to the parts already done. Due to the addition of tolerances, the front thread will be 2 till 3 mm wider as calculated; this translate in 2" till 3" on the real car. This is indeed a benefit as I found the wheel too far inwards on the real car.

    On the pictures there are wood blocks under the frame; they are needed as I don't have yet springs





    Let's go now on the steering linkage with other ball joints!

    The logical step after finishing the suspension was to do the steering linkage. When you are looking at the parts, they are all easy and simple...As I had no dimension for them, I had to improvise the best I could, with the help of pictures.

    I did first the small ball joints with a 2mm ball (about .08") studs and cups. Easy, I have routine!



    Then came the steering arms; a rather complex part. Fortunately, a drawing into the '57 Lincoln/Continental shop manual supplement was a good help. Then came the tie rods and drag link. At the end, the idler arm was done; an easy looking part but I had no idea how it is constitued. I assume it could not be very different than the ones from Cadillac (which are notoriously undersized), but I could not do a coarse thread and have no play. Therefore, I did something on my own.

    All in all, I'm satisfied with the steering; maybe it is too fast: 2 turn from lock to lock! This atypical fast steering is the result of the parts I had on stock. There is a little bit of play in the steering box, especially at the worm. Due to the fast ratio, this is very noticeable.

    I had also to do a universal joint at the inlet of the steering box; by looking at the pictures in the shop manual it seems there is one. Anyway, due to the complicated original construction, a regular flector cannot be installed.

    On one of the pictures, that universal joint can be seen; it is not yet completely finished.







    The rear axle is again one of those castings I hate/love. How to begin? The first step was to determine the offset of the pinion and the distance of that pinion in relation to the wheel's axles. According to some literature, the distance between both axles is .2 to .25 times the diameter of the ring gear. When those dimensions were set, I began with the pinion tube and the axle shafts tube, adjusted both in relation to each other and hard soldered them as you can see at the first pictures.





    Prior to that, I did already the easy parts: axle shafts and axles tubes. They come in "action" later, of course.

    Then I began to shape the diff with flat brass and soldered them together to the skeleton. I don't know how many small bits of brass were needed to construct the diff as it is now, many is what I remember! Each part added to the skeleton is in precarious equilibrium until it's soldered, therefore most of the time just one can be brazed, sometimes two. Then the next bit is cut, adjusted, soldered, etc.

    The last pictures are showing the differential the way it was with the last hard soldering. Now all missing elements will be soft soldered. Finally, the end cover will be done.

    Even if some details are not yet done at the front, I want now to go at the rear of the frame and do the rear axle and suspension.

    The rear axle is again one of those castings I hate/love. How to begin? The first step was to determine the offset of the pinion and the distance of that pinion in relation to the wheel's axles. According to some literature, the distance between both axles is .2 to .25 times the diameter of the ring gear. When those dimensions were set, I began with the pinion tube and the axle shafts tube, adjusted both in relation to each other and hard soldered them as you can see at the first pictures.

    Prior to that, I did already the easy parts: axle shafts and axles tubes. They come in "action" later, of course.

    Then I began to shape the diff with flat brass and soldered them together to the skeleton. I don't know how many small bits of brass were needed to construct the diff as it is now, many is what I remember! Each part added to the skeleton is in precarious equilibrium until it's soldered, therefore most of the time just one can be brazed, sometimes two. Then the next bit is cut, adjusted, soldered, etc.

    The last pictures are showing the differential the way it was with the last hard soldering. Now all missing elements will be soft soldered. Finally, the end cover will be done.






    Continental Mark II
    Last edited by Roger Zimmermann; 03-18-19 at 11:34 AM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #2165

  5. JunkGTZ's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Larry
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
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    310
    Well Roger, I know you've put years of work into this one and just looking at your skill in making these individual parts makes me weak in the knees! But since you've already made the body forms perhaps.......

    https://silodrome.com/1956-continental-mark-ii/


    Just kidding! You've done some incredible work here!
    QUOTE QUOTE #2166

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