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Continental Mark II
Goal amount for this year: 518 USD, Received: 295.00 USD (57%)
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    1. Kit: Roger Zimmermann, by (Yearly Subscriber) Roger Zimmermann is offline
      Builder Last Online: Aug 2019 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/12 Rating:  (17 votes - 5.00 average) Thanks: 25
      Started: 05-17-12 Build Revisions: Never  
      Not Supported Scratch Built

      As stated in my presentation, I'm doing since 2 years a Continental Mark II, scale 1:12. Presently, I'm doing the floor; the trunk floor is ready. The next step is going towards the front by doing the floor under the rear seat. To spare metal and unnecessary reworks, I did first a model with cardboard. Now, it will be easier to cut the brass at the proper place.


      Continental Mark II
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  1. DominiqueBeerts's Avatar Avid Belgian
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    Wow!
    Best regards,
    Dominique.


    Feel free to browse through my photo albums
    QUOTE QUOTE #2162

  2. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    As you may imagine, the frame is slowly coming to completion. There are however all the small details which are added before it's too late: a bracket here, a support there...

    The front end is now finished as I added the support for the radiator and the front bumper supports, with one major exception: the outside frame rail at the idler arm has a particular form; for the moment I cannot do it because I don't know yet the angle of the arm and the distance of its mounting bracket relative to a major element of the frame. I will know it when the steering box is completed. That odd stamping will be inserted into the frame and fixed with soft solder.



    At the back, the frame was not completed: the bumper stop for the rear axle was missing; it's now soldered to the cross member, slightly off-center towards the passenger side. Is that bracket absolutely conforming to the reality? Maybe, in my application, the rear axle will not bump often to that bracket! I added also both support to the body; they are called "body support # 6". I still have to do the reinforcement at the rear of the frame for the rear hanger.



    The frame is finished, without to be totally ready. Well, there is still a form to be done at the place the bolts for the idler arm are located. First, I have to do the steering box to know where the idler arm should be located. As the frame will be put on side for some time, I decided to clean it, first in cheap vinegar to remove all traces of silver solder cleaning agent, then with sandpaper. To avoid that the surface get oxidized, I applied a good coat of primer Continental Mark II .





    By chance, I had a steering box to photograph and measure. This is again a complicated casting Continental Mark II part; on top of the form, its function is adding some complexity.

    I had the good fortune to find in my remaining parts from an other age a worm and pinion which could be usable for that purpose. The distance between axles is indeed very near to the calculated distance; sometimes compromises are necessary.

    The input and output shafts are made with brass (what else?) but I'm using steel inserts into the "casting". This will prevent to get too much play in a short period of time: brass on brass is not the best, brass on steel is much better. Hardened steel on steel is the best, but we are dealing here with a static model!

    With my weak machine, I could manage to have less than .01 mm (.0004") play between the shafts and inserts; by necessity, there will be some play between the worm and pinion, otherwise I could not turn the steering wheel.

    The box is not yet ready: some details must be added as well as the valve body. The pictured screws on the side cover will be replaced with more realistic ones when the box is ready.







    The steering gear is ready. Of course, I still need to do the Pitman arm and the universal joint at the steering shaft. Later...

    I may have to reshape the LH exhaust manifold. Its outlet is very near from the steering gear's valve body; I will see for sure when I can put the engine on the frame.







    With the attachment point for the idler arm at the outside rail, the frame is ready. There will be cosmetic improvements, but no welding anymore (unless I forgot something)!



    As I need to locate the engine on the frame, I will now continue with the transmission.

    As the box is temporary installed, I can look for the idler arm and modify the frame.


    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #2163

  3. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    As I had not right on hand the large stock needed to do the converter housing, I began with the transmission's extension. The main part is mostly done on the lathe, with some milling. As pictured below, the extension is practically finished, with the exception of holes for the rear mount and for the speedometer gear. I took a short cut: I id not a separate cover for the access hole to the governor; why? The answer is easy: the extension is well hidden by the frame; most of the work I did will not be visible.

    It's not quite the same with the converter housing: with a wide open hood, it can be seen. The people at Franklin Mint did spare here: there is just nothing after the engine on the Mark II model from this company, just the bottom is represented!

    The pictures are showing that housing while the part is not finished: the lower part needs some heavy work; the housing for the starter motor is to be done too.





    I noticed from the pictures I have from a real housing that the above part is more rounded than the lower one; I did the entire form on the lathe, then with a good file, I did the correct shape for the upper part.

    Today, October first, 2011, I could complete the torque converter housing. Some holes are missing, as well as the sheet metal parts (the cover at the engine's side and the duct for cooling). This small part is the assembly of about 15 pieces!

    I assembled it to the engine, together with the starter motor. It seems that I did my home work well; I had just a small interference between the engine block and the starter motor.





    I will continue now with the transmission's case, another nice casting Continental Mark II part!

    This time, I will try to show how many separate parts are needed to form a casting Continental Mark II with just flat brass. I'm showing the beginning: the flange of the case which attach to the converter's housing soldered to the bottom of the transmission and another picture showing the case (or what is done) to the housing.

    Up to now, the case is done with 4 elements.





    The rear flange was added to the case. As it was done with 2 pieces to show the details, we are now at 6 pieces and it's not yet obvious that it will be a transmission's case.






    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #2164

  4. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Some more parts added; it's more looking like a transmission than before...Now, it's time to decoration with the various raised castings. They will all be soft soldered. Parts count now: 10.



    I "quickly" added 8 parts to what is already done. This way, the RH side of the transmission's case is ready. It will be better looking with a little paint, but, obviously, it's too early...Parts count now: 18.



    Today October 10, I finished the LH side of the case. With the addition of 5 pieces, the total count is now 23 for a total weight of 12 grams (.4 oz).





    The next task will be the oil pan for the transmission. Unfortunately, I forgot to measure the depth while measuring the transmission and my pictures are no good to evaluate that. I hope that somebody from the Mark II forum will help again!

    With the exception of a few details which will be added later, the transmission is basically finished. I even sprayed some primer Continental Mark II on the main case as this part is really finished. The oil pan needs some cosmetic improvement as well as the oil refill tube; this part will be just inserted in the pan and fixed somewhere (I don't know yet where it is attached).

    The screws you can see are not all the definitive ones; I used what I had on hand.







    I will now do the front engine supports, assemble the transmission to the engine and drop the assembly on the frame. Maybe some rework will be needed; I don't know yet.

    The LH side is quite different and, less easy to do.


    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #2165

  5. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    major milestone will be when the engine can be positioned on the frame. This happened on October 17, 2011. As anticipated, there were some interference; the main one was between the exhaust collector and the steering gear. I have some pictures from the real car, but I cannot evaluate the distance between both elements.

    I tilted a bit the manifold (the flanges will no more correspond exactly with the ones from the block) and I lowered a bit the valve body. At the end, I have a gap of .5 mm (0.02").

    The other interference was between the oil pan and the second crossmember; a slight modification of the pan was the solution.

    As expected also, the alignment left/right and front/rear is not perfect as many tolerances are added up.

    Those imperfections will not be seen once the model is completed but I'm just unhappy that this happens...

    I will have to do a device to calculate exactly the distance between the top of the air cleaner and the top of the frame (which is called point zero). With a rough measurement, it seems that I will have a gap of .5 mm (again 0.02") between the air cleaner and the hood...Therefore, I must know exactly where I am to maybe modify some elements to get more clearance; 2 mm would be nice (0.08").









    '56 Mark II had an air cooling transmission. After the drive train was on the frame, I had to complete the transmission with those 2 sheet metal parts. I had enough pictures to understand the shape; anyway, I had to do 2 wood forms to shape the metal.

    As those parts are more or less ready, I cleaned them and gave a coat of primer Continental Mark II .

    Right now, I don't know with what I will continue: A/C compressor and brackets for it plus generator or front suspension. You will know soon!





    Before I'm tackling the lower front suspension arms, I finished the starter motor, add a little coat of primer Continental Mark II and installed it on the engine. Of course, all those installed parts will be removed for the final paint (When?).



    The clear spot on the oil pan is where I had an interference with the frame. This spot will be improved in due time.

    I decided to begin the front suspension, with the lower "A" arms.
    Those arms are taking more time as anticipated (sounds familiar!); the shape is odd, nothing is square. Anyway, some progress can be reported as you can see on the attached picture. On the left, one arm is temporary attached together with screws; the other arm is not assembled. On top, there are both parts I cut too narrow and are scrap.



    What I have to do is the form for the spring's bed; I will try to do it as a pressed part with brass and polyester dies. Maybe…

    To continue with the lower lever, I did a form for the spring bed with the intention to press a thin piece of brass between that form and the negative of it in polyester.

    While the polyester was curing Continental Mark II , I began the upper ball joints for the suspension. I checked what I did with the Toronado (I still have all shop drawings), choose the suitable balls and turned the studs for the upper and lower ball joints. This is on this picture; the lower balls are larger in diameter.



    The next picture is showing the balls silver soldered on the studs. On the same picture, there is a spare ball joint I still have for the Toronado.



    As the polyester would not cure Continental Mark II (probably too few droplets of hardener), I continued with the upper cases. This is again a cast part, more complicated to do as a sheet metal case...At first I wanted to do the case as simple as possible, but I realized soon that I could not partially close the case to keep the stud in place.



    After doing some special tools, I put some grease into the case, inserted the stud and then I squeezed the case with the tool. This action is bending a little bit the brass around the ball preventing it to go out.



    The last picture is showing both upper ball joints, lubed for life!



    The lower levers are now more or less ready. Missing are the rubber bumpers (they will be done at a later date) and some holes, as well as the welded nuts for the shock absorbers.

    The bed for the spring was pressed between two forms, one was in polyester. I was careful not to apply too much force on the vice as I was afraid the polyester would not resist. Indeed, I could do 4 pieces (2 were scrap) and the polyester broke the last time I intended to squeeze a bit more. Some more "tools" were necessary to form the parts; I have the impression they are good for that purpose.



    The "inner" side is not so good looking as the outside; when the model is completed, the inside of the arms will barely be visible.



    Now, it's time for the lower ball joints!


    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #2166

  6. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Once the A arms were ready, I installed them on the frame.





    After the lower ball joints, it was time to do the spindles. This was a long affair as to see the progress I had to install each spindle on the suspension levers, install the drum/wheel assembly until the camber was right and the distance of the tire to the upper ball joint was more or less the same as the real car (12 X smaller, of course).

    Then, I had the problem to locate the spindle in relation to the suspension arms; fortunately, a member of the Mark II forum gave me the dimension I asked.

    The spindles are not the exact replica of the real parts; I had to suit them to the parts already done. Due to the addition of tolerances, the front thread will be 2 till 3 mm wider as calculated; this translate in 2" till 3" on the real car. This is indeed a benefit as I found the wheel too far inwards on the real car.

    On the pictures there are wood blocks under the frame; they are needed as I don't have yet springs





    Let's go now on the steering linkage with other ball joints!

    The logical step after finishing the suspension was to do the steering linkage. When you are looking at the parts, they are all easy and simple...As I had no dimension for them, I had to improvise the best I could, with the help of pictures.

    I did first the small ball joints with a 2mm ball (about .08") studs and cups. Easy, I have routine!



    Then came the steering arms; a rather complex part. Fortunately, a drawing into the '57 Lincoln/Continental shop manual supplement was a good help. Then came the tie rods and drag link. At the end, the idler arm was done; an easy looking part but I had no idea how it is constitued. I assume it could not be very different than the ones from Cadillac (which are notoriously undersized), but I could not do a coarse thread and have no play. Therefore, I did something on my own.

    All in all, I'm satisfied with the steering; maybe it is too fast: 2 turn from lock to lock! This atypical fast steering is the result of the parts I had on stock. There is a little bit of play in the steering box, especially at the worm. Due to the fast ratio, this is very noticeable.

    I had also to do a universal joint at the inlet of the steering box; by looking at the pictures in the shop manual it seems there is one. Anyway, due to the complicated original construction, a regular flector cannot be installed.

    On one of the pictures, that universal joint can be seen; it is not yet completely finished.







    The rear axle is again one of those castings I hate/love. How to begin? The first step was to determine the offset of the pinion and the distance of that pinion in relation to the wheel's axles. According to some literature, the distance between both axles is .2 to .25 times the diameter of the ring gear. When those dimensions were set, I began with the pinion tube and the axle shafts tube, adjusted both in relation to each other and hard soldered them as you can see at the first pictures.





    Prior to that, I did already the easy parts: axle shafts and axles tubes. They come in "action" later, of course.

    Then I began to shape the diff with flat brass and soldered them together to the skeleton. I don't know how many small bits of brass were needed to construct the diff as it is now, many is what I remember! Each part added to the skeleton is in precarious equilibrium until it's soldered, therefore most of the time just one can be brazed, sometimes two. Then the next bit is cut, adjusted, soldered, etc.

    The last pictures are showing the differential the way it was with the last hard soldering. Now all missing elements will be soft soldered. Finally, the end cover will be done.

    Even if some details are not yet done at the front, I want now to go at the rear of the frame and do the rear axle and suspension.

    The rear axle is again one of those castings I hate/love. How to begin? The first step was to determine the offset of the pinion and the distance of that pinion in relation to the wheel's axles. According to some literature, the distance between both axles is .2 to .25 times the diameter of the ring gear. When those dimensions were set, I began with the pinion tube and the axle shafts tube, adjusted both in relation to each other and hard soldered them as you can see at the first pictures.

    Prior to that, I did already the easy parts: axle shafts and axles tubes. They come in "action" later, of course.

    Then I began to shape the diff with flat brass and soldered them together to the skeleton. I don't know how many small bits of brass were needed to construct the diff as it is now, many is what I remember! Each part added to the skeleton is in precarious equilibrium until it's soldered, therefore most of the time just one can be brazed, sometimes two. Then the next bit is cut, adjusted, soldered, etc.

    The last pictures are showing the differential the way it was with the last hard soldering. Now all missing elements will be soft soldered. Finally, the end cover will be done.






    Continental Mark II
    Last edited by Roger Zimmermann; 03-18-19 at 11:34 AM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #2167

  7. JunkGTZ's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Well Roger, I know you've put years of work into this one and just looking at your skill in making these individual parts makes me weak in the knees! But since you've already made the body forms perhaps.......

    https://silodrome.com/1956-continental-mark-ii/


    Just kidding! You've done some incredible work here!
    QUOTE QUOTE #2168

  8. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Tanks for the comments and link, Larry! Interesting resto-mod, but I will never do a second car! In fact, I'm glad I'm over and can take time to do other things. By the way, I don't have the wood buck anymore!


    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #2169

  9. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Not yet finished and already needed a repair? Well, when I hard soldered the front supports for the rear springs I had my mind at another place.

    Yesterday, I was ready to solder the spring's locating plates to the rear axles. I needed the exact location, took my older frame's sketch. The distance between the front spring's supports was absolutely not in line with the measures I wrote down on my plan. I could measure the way I wanted, 2.5 mm (0.1") were missing. Boy, what a frustration!

    I'm sure nobody would have noticed, but I could not let the frame that way. I removed the RH support (as the supports are silver soldered, the only way to remove them is to grind them) and fabricated 2 new supports.

    Today, I installed the removed support and, in retrospect, I was lucky to remove the "right" one: it was this one which was out of line; the LH one is 0.4 mm nearer from the center as planed, too little to warrant an heavy surgery.

    Now, I have a spare part in stock…



    As you can see on the pictures, the rear axle is now ready (The date was December 14, 2011). Missing are the brake shields; they will come later as I don't have enough data to do them now.

    The end cover will get more screws; they will be added during final assembly.







    Since I began the frame, the rear spring's hangers were a concern. I cannot do them in brass, the material is too weak for the task. Sure, by using a thick bit of brass there will be no problem, but that thickness will be out of proportion. Stainless steel? It's strong, and here, I will have problem with my drilling bits as the material is not kind with them.

    As I was searching for a suitable material, I came across a broken hacksaw blade. Bingo! It is not too thick and obviously strong enough. Of course, I had to heat it to remove the hardening. The sole question was if the steel would be soft enough to let form the eye without breaking?

    The first attempt was positive, although I saw one or two tiny cracks. The steel was also soft enough to be drilled, but strong enough for the task.

    The next problem was the shackle. On Continentals it is like a "U" with bushings screwed into the hanger and spring. I had to do it differently. Of course, brass is again the wrong metal as one end is staying open. In my shop (were my cars are stored), I would certainly have some iron wire of the proper diameter, but I had no envy to drive one hour just for 50 mm of wire!

    Finally, I found "Pop-rivets" I had in a box since certainly 30 years (why I had them, no idea, I don't have the tool...) I noticed that the steel shaft is hardened; it probably the most valuable part of those rivets and it gets discarded!

    The diameter was not exactly what I was looking for; a little machining did the trick. I did some examples without machining first, to evaluate the process. At the end, the result is quite satisfying.

    The next few days will be devoted to the rear spring hangers and the material to do the springs.



    This week-end, I could temporary install the rear axle on the car as the rear springs were done. However, I may replace them: the spring steel I used is a bit too thick and, for the moment, there is just one leaf each side, like Novas and Toronados had in the past. If I'm adding 7 other leaves with the same material, the suspension will be too stiff!

    As I have no idea regarding the weight when completed, I'm keeping for the moment the rear suspension as is; if I have to do new springs it will just add a couple hours to the project, not a big deal.







    What next? The drive shaft is in the pipe-line!


    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #2170

  10. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    The drive shaft required a lot of machining, especially to do the universal joints. As you can see on the pictures below, there is a central bearing. At first I did it solid, the shaft turning into a large brass part. Then I realized that the shaft is not parallel with the frame, but the outer shell of that support is squarely attached to the frame. The only solution was a rubber insulator which allows the drive shaft to be at an angle.





    If the drive shaft would transmit some power, I would need another manufacturing method, as the shaft now is not quite turning true!


    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #2171

  11. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    The last effort for the year 2011! It's not a fancy one: I managed to do 2 pieces: the A/C pulley and the compressor's cylinder head. Next year will see the birth of the compressor's case.



    The construction resumed this week (mid January 2012), as I expected. After more or less finishing the case, I did yesterday the upper bracket. That thing had to be physically positioned on the engine in a way I can continue.

    The upper bracket is probably not very accurate; I had to adapt it in relation to the items around it. Anyway, it allows seeing the relationship with the engine block at the lower case where the lower bracket/oil pan for the compressor is located (not yet done).

    That lower bracket/oil pan has provisions for the generator; I will have to do the generator first…



    As mentioned previously, I had to do the generator to continue the lower bracket of the A/C compressor. A generator is usually a large cylinder with two flanges to attach it somewhere and a pulley. Quite easy...

    The pulley /fan is a casting Continental Mark II part, I did it also in one piece, machined and not cast; I'm pleased with the result. The flange behind the pulley is easy to do; however, I managed to do it wrong: I forgot to add the ear for its adjustment! That wrong piece is on the top of the first picture; the other parts, including the capacitor, are ready to be assembled. The rear flange is a cast aluminum part with some recesses. Even if this part can hardly be seen, I did the recesses by milling. A nice small exercise!



    The completed generator:



    As you can imagine, the space is very tight; I was afraid that the compressor would interfere with the frame. In fact, I have 1 mm (.039") clearance between the A/C case and upper suspension lever.

    The lower bracket/casting for the A/C compressor was an interesting and difficult part to do: this is the part which is responsible for the correct location of the compressor on the engine. Too much forward/rearward the pulley doesn't align any more with the ones from the engine, etc., etc.

    I began with the oil pan by milling a thick piece of metal, including the provision for the small side bracket (not yet done). Then I soldered another piece which will be screwed to the engine block. All went rather well but slowly; unfortunately, the holes for the screws were not exactly at the right place and I had to elongate them.

    The "tongues" for the generator were also tricky to solder; I began with the rear one, adjusting his thickness to have the right pulley's location and did the hole for the screw. I went then to the one in front; while silver soldering it, the rear one moved a bit...could however correct it. Then I found that the generator was too low according to the many pictures I have. Did another hole at the rear tongue, then I could do the one in front. Of course, it was not at the right location so I had to elongate the hole in the front flange of the generator.



    I'm satisfied with the whole assembly, but something is not quite right: the bracket to adjust the generator will interfere with the generator's body; the ear of the front flange is probably at the wrong angle or it's hole too near from the body. If this assembly would be highly visible, I would redo a third generator front flange. However, this time I will cheat a little bit!



    January 28, 2012, I finished the A/C compressor; all brackets are done as well as both fittings at each side of the compressor.

    On the real car, the bowl on the crankcase draft tube has an indentation to avoid an interference with the square tube of the fitting near the water pump. Did I a better design that the Ford people? Anyway, I had not to do the indentation, there is no contact between both parts. Either is the compressor lower that the real one or the ventilation tube is not located at the right place or...



    On the previous post, I related a possible difficulty with a generator's bracket. I solve the problem by doing an installation error. I'm wondering if you can find it! (Lincoln or Mark II owners are not allowed to answer...)



    The answer to my question is simple: on the real car, the adjusting bracket is attached at the second bold from under. I installed it at the third bolt...

    As I'm waiting some pictures of the brake shields, I began last week the mufflers and resonators. The mufflers are done with thin brass (.2 mm or .008"); the resonators were machined. All is very light: the 4 pieces have a weight of 17 grams; one muffler is 5 grams.






    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #2172

  12. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger Zimmermann
    Hello Roger,

    Thank you for sharing all these photos with us! I think that some are being shared for the first time? I do not remember seeing a few from before, maybe I'm wrong?

    -Don
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #2173

  13. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Hi Don!
    They were all published in the AACA forum. As I'm doing a "copy/paste", I have both forums open and I can follow the sequence for the pictures.
    Sometimes I have to modify slightly the text compared to what I wrote in the AACA or Mark II forum.


    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #2174

  14. JunkGTZ's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Am I the only one who finds the prop/driveshaft mounting on top of the frame rail unusual? I've no doubt that's how it is on the real car, but I can imagine that changing a U joint on the 1:1 Continental Mark II vehicle must have been a difficult job unless you could remove the interior console to take it out. I imagine it was done to set the car lower for a lower center of gravity and better handling. As always, wonderful to see you handywork!
    QUOTE QUOTE #2175

  15. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Thanks Larry!
    In fact, the whole vehicle is totally maintenance unfriendly. On the tunnel, there are "doors" for some maintenance at the transmission and drive shaft; to access them, the carpet must be removed.
    The steering box is a nightmare to remove too; the engine must go out if the transmission has to be overhauled.
    Ask people who take the radio out for repair what they think!


    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #2176

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