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    1. Kit: Roger Zimmermann, by (Yearly Subscriber) Roger Zimmermann is offline
      Builder Last Online: Mar 2019 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/12 Rating:  (17 votes - 5.00 average) Thanks: 25
      Started: 05-17-12 Build Revisions: Never  
      Not Supported Scratch Built

      As stated in my presentation, I'm doing since 2 years a Continental Mark II, scale 1:12. Presently, I'm doing the floor; the trunk floor is ready. The next step is going towards the front by doing the floor under the rear seat. To spare metal and unnecessary reworks, I did first a model with cardboard. Now, it will be easier to cut the brass at the proper place.


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  1. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    As I was tired from tiny bits of brass soldered on another part itself already soft soldered on another bit, I decided the time was coming to do something really simple: hubs and drums.

    I began with the front hubs and spindles. As some dimensions are still missing, I can not finish the spindles yet, the flanges are still untouched.

    Over the years, I noticed that brass on brass movement was not very reliable; too much play is the result. As the model will not be motorized but just be a push mobile from time to time (for example by the 3-year kid of the neighbors assisted by his 2-years old sister?), miniature ball bearings were not an option like I have on the Toronado model. Therefore, I did some mild steel bearings forced into the hubs.



    Then, I began the rear drums. There is a lot of machine work, but for once there is a simple form, not like the rear Studebaker drums with transverse fins.





    The last picture is showing the front drums, more exactly, the huge piece of brass needed!



    The holes for the studs are not yet done, they will be bored when all related parts are finished, also the flanges for the rear axles. It should happens this week-end.

    All four are now ready, with the corresponding hub. The real rear hubs are forged with the axle shaft; for the model, a short shaft will be soft soldered to the hub when it will be the turn of the rear axle.

    I simulated a silencer spring on one rear drum with an O-ring. I will have to choose O-rings with a taller section.



    Now, I will begin a simplified carburator; it will more or less look like a Holley, but not in all details as it will be mostly unseen.

    This is to illustrate my comments about how difficult parts are done. I'm beginning the carburator; Holleys are really complex. Impossible to do with one piece of brass; I'm trying to find the simple elements. 2 are obvious: the carb base and the air cleaner base. By looking at pictures, I saw the "in between" can be done as cylinders, with some rework.

    The picture is showing the separate parts:



    and the second one when all is brazed together. The holes on the air cleaner's base are for small screws to hold the cylinders prior to brazing. Another one was temporary added at the carb base. After brazing, the screws are removed.



    Now, some details will be added, either silver or soft soldered.


    Continental Mark II
    Last edited by Roger Zimmermann; 03-13-19 at 08:08 AM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #2147

  2. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    The progress to the carb went quicker as anticipated. The throttle body is finished; I have to do now the accessories like throttle levers, choke and the secondary diaphragm housing.

    The dashpot is done and, while doing the bores for the idle screws, I broke one .5 mm drill (.02"); I spend some time to extract the remains of the drill...

    The cylinder above the throttle body is just here to held the air cleaner. As this part is not to be seen, it will remain that way.

    The nuts on the dashpot are almost out of proportion; maybe I will do them thinner Continental Mark II .





    The carburator is ready, but it will not be the nicest part of the model. Oddly shape, too many details in a small volume and lack of motivation as most will be unseen. During the construction, that thing looked more like an hedgehog than a carb...Fortunately, the external accessories are improving the look. A little paint would be good too, but it's too early.

    With the number of hours spent for that assembly, I could have done the half of the frame…







    Now, I can finish the front of the air cleaner. There is also a recession at the back for the giraffe (the official name is: Automatic transmission control linkage); as the giraffe is not yet born, this will be done later.

    After the nightmare with the carb, I did easy things: the front of the air cleaner was finished and after that, I began the fan. As most '56 Mak II with A/C have nice nostrils on the rear quarters, my model will have A/C; therefore I had to choose the correct fan. Cars without A/C have a 5-blade fan; cars with A/C have 6 blades. The shape of the blades is also different, as well as the outside diameter of the fan.

    The blades of "my" fan are also held by rivets, like the original fans. No glue, no solder, just four .5 mm (.02") rivets in copper per blade. The whole trick is to determine the proper length of the copper wire; for my application 1.5 mm (.06") was ideal. Once a "rivet" is inserted in the hole, a hammer blow on a prepared piece of brass with a very small hammer is sufficient to secure the assembly as copper is very soft. I would not let run this fan at 10'000 RPM, but for my application the joint is strong enough. I forgot probably to mention that all pulleys will be rotating (that my child's side) and a weak blast of air let turn the fan.

    The inserted pictures are showing the engine as is now (without the oil pan); do you see something from the carb?






    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #2148

  3. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger Zimmermann
    Thank you for posting all these pictures.

    This is very helpful!

    Anybody who had not seen these before, I am sure, it now reconsidering what level their work can now attain. You have raised the bar, and it is for the rest of us to aspire to.

    Thank you for all that you have shown and shared!

    -Don
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #2149

  4. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    You are welcome, Don! It's not yet over, I still have plenty to show until I'm at the beginning of this thread!


    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #2150

  5. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    An engine with fins? It looks that way on the first attached picture!



    This is just the beginning of the exhaust manifold. The LH completed one can be seen on the next picture.



    Are those exhaust manifolds easy to do? At first glance yes, but with my basic measures I had, there were more questions than answers. If the manifolds are too high or too wide does not matter much because there is enough space around the engine.

    The sole detail which is really important is the location of the outlet flange! As the pipes are going through the inner front fenders, this location is rather critical. I hope to be within 1/32" (which in reality is translated by 3/8") of the real dimension; I suppose that I will have anyway to play a little bit with the shape on the inner fender to suit my requirements...

    Another difficulty with the manifold's construction is the rear: the outlet is at 90 and the form is going from square to round...

    At fist, I intended to do the manifolds from a large piece of brass; at the end, I'm doing them with flat brass for 2 reasons:

    - weight: if I don't want the model to be 10 pounds heavy, I have to reduce the weight where I can

    - shape: as I was in the blue, I can do what I know and progress until the final shape is almost there; much more difficult with a large piece of brass

    I'm glad because the RH manifold is ready.



    Now, I can continue with the air duct assembly. As this part is a tight fit over the LH exhaust manifold, I had to wait until the manifold was done.

    The air duct is a simple sheet metal part with an elbow. I will have to do a form either in brass or wood to shape the part.

    As somebody from the Mark II forum would like to see in detail how I'm doing that duct, I will publish on this forum the same steps.

    First I had to choose a piece of wood, without to make the deforestation problem worse. I can say that this danger is discarded: by looking at the wood's duct, I could hardly heat the whole house next winter when the form will not be needed any more.

    As only one part will be done, a soft wood is acceptable; for a small batch, only hard wood would be acceptable.

    The wood's form is more or less like the duct I would like to have; the dimensions are reduced to take in account the thickness of the brass. Next to the form is a piece of brass, ready to be hammered on the wood; this will be the upper part of the duct. The quarter dollar will not be hammered; it's just here for the size. As you can see, that part is not large. Why am I not doing it full in brass? Two reasons, at least: the weight. Even if it's a tiny part, the accumulation of too many grams can be a problem for the tires. Then, the duct must be installed on the short piece soldered to the air cleaner. If the duct is solid, I should hollow that part, which is not an easy task. There is a third reason: on the real duct, both halves are welded at a flange; with the solution I choose, the flange will be easy to form.



    With some well placed hammer blows, the first half could be formed. I had to cut at the inside corner; with a strong pattern, this step could be avoid. I will add a small bit of brass and silver solder to the main part. The other side will have the same treatment.

    On the second picture, the part is more or less ready; it must be trimmed and the dimensions adjusted. I now can do the other half, probably tomorrow as today I'm opening the season of hard work: I will open a defective '59 Hydramatic for overhauling. This work is not done at home but in my storage room at 10 miles from home.






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    QUOTE QUOTE #2151

  6. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    The first half has been trimmed; the flange has been silver soldered to it and a small round piece done on the lathe added. This small round piece will help to align the other half with more precision.

    The original duct has ears near the air cleaner; by screwing in both screws the duct can be assembled tightly to the air cleaner. Obviously, my construction does not allow that; I had to search for another method: a long screw will go into the air cleaner at the opening and the duct will be tightly assembled with a nut. I'm glad the air cleaner has a separate lid to install the nut!

    The picture is showing both halves and the long screw. Once both halves are soft soldered, I will have to do the shroud which is slipped over the exhaust manifold. I don't have to forget to add a stud as a support for the duct like the original part.



    The air duct is finished; only the small lever on the side is missing, it will be added later.

    As my explanations how I will attach the duct to the air cleaner were probably not very understandable, this picture is showing it. It's not very nice looking inside the air cleaner, but who cares once it's assembled?



    The other pictures are showing the installed assembly.






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    QUOTE QUOTE #2152

  7. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    After the air cleaner duct, it was the turn of the power steering pump. I did first the easy part: the pulley...then, the reservoir and cover, easy parts. The difficulties began with the first support, the one which is attached to the water pump. 3 holes are given, but where to place the other 2? Thanks to the great number of pictures I have, the completed part is looking right.

    The second support was another matter: few infos and the drawing in the shop manual is obviously incorrect. As I was totally in the blue, I continued with the next element: the pump body. The shop manual is giving a rather good breakdown of the part and fortunately, last year I had measured the diameter of the reservoir cover.

    When the pump body was done, I could come back to the second support, doing it at first in cardboard...Once done in brass, the great moment came: will the pulley of the pump align with the one from the crankshaft? You bet, it did not. I had to modify the thickness of both supports (which was only estimated) until the alignment was correct. The motor will not be functional, but the idea to have misaligned pulleys is against my nature!



    Once this detail solved, I could finish the pump. Still missing is the star nut to close the cover; for the moment there is just a too long screw which is just here to avoid loosing the cover.





    After the power steering pump, it would be logical to continue with the A/C compressor. However, this is a tight fit at the front of the engine; this explains why the road draft tube has some indentations. Therefore, I had to do the oil filler and draft tube first.



    I will certainly have to add more indentation on the tube when I'm "installing" the compressor but I'm not yet so far. To tell the truth, I have enough for the moment with the myriad of small parts to be added to the basic engine: today, I ordered a large piece of brass to begin the frame; at least something large and easy (maybe) to do!

    This will force me to finish the frame drawing I began long ago.

    When I was at the draft tube, I did also the tube for the dip stick; this part is different for cars with A/C.

    The begin of the frame!
    The first task I intended to do was the side members. However, I have to do a form in brass to hammer the sheet metal on it. This will be done probably tomorrow; this form will not be done home as I have to bend it; the small hammer I'm using home will not be enough; therefore I will shape it where my cars are stored.

    I began easy parts: the crossmember (it is in 2 parts) which is on most '56 models and deleted on some '57 ones.





    What are those parts? Is the picture below showing the side rails from the frame?



    Not exactly: these ugly parts are the form on which the brass will be shaped. These parts must first be trimmed before the forming can begin. This will require probably more work that to bend the sheet metal...

    Each half crossmember is dome with 2 pieces of brass .4 mm thick. Some small holes missing; they will be done later.


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    QUOTE QUOTE #2153

  8. PROPELLER's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    What a lesson! Another one...
    Thanks Roger!
    Dan.
    QUOTE QUOTE #2154

  9. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    You are welcome, Dan!
    We continue now with the frame, we are now early May 2011.
    After 10 days holiday, I'm back to business, the model and other tasks. Today, I could finish the LH side rail's form.



    Why don't use it as is? Again, the weight problem. Then, I may have difficulties to silver solder the cross members as the heat source I have is rather limited. The final aspect is also important: the side members are done as double "U" elements welded together. There is a step between the outer element and the inner one; the part in full could not show it.

    Another aspect I still have to confirm: I have the impression that double "U" form is less flexible than a part in full. I will have confirmation when I'm that far as the form will still be available.

    Today (May 8, 2011), I finished the second frame's form, as well as the die necessary to reproduce the indentation on the side of the frame.

    On the picture, a small sample of the side has been done as a test.



    Now, the fun will begin, however not at home: I need a larger vice to bend the sheet metal around the forms.

    Now that the forms are completed, it's time to continue with the real parts. The indentation on the side was easy to do thanks to a careful preparation; the remaining was bending and bending again...

    You will notice on the picture that the side members are not in one piece: my brass sheet was too short! Even with enough length, I had certainly done the side members in 2 pieces for ease of handling.

    The rear part of the side members is not yet formed as you can see.



    On the top of the picture, there is the cross member on which the rear shock absorbers are fitted. Just below, it's the easier part I have for the frame: the rear cross member just after the tank: it's a straight tube! Of course, there will be 2 bracket silver solder on it to fix the trunk's floor; this will be done when all is installed.


    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #2155

  10. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Last week, I formed the rear parts of the side members and attached them to the front parts. The trick is to silver solder both elements while keeping the general shape. So far, so good.

    The inner rail is thicker as the outside one: .5 mm versus .3 mm. If I should do the frame again, I would choose .4 mm for the outside rail: once heated, the thinner Continental Mark II one is soft like cheese; this fact is responsible for bad surprises.

    The body will be attached to the frame with screws; at the factory, nuts were welded to the inner rail. I cannot do that because of my primitive setting. To overcome the difficulty, I silver soldered a long strip at the upper inner rail. This operation can be seen on one picture.

    Then I had to adjust the inner rail to the outside one; when this was done, I inserted small pins to avoid a displacement during the heating process. All went well so far.

    To bend .5 mm brass required much more efforts than the .3 mm; therefore I decided to do the inner rail in 3 parts. The straight line are not a problem, the curves are!

    Halas, the small "in between" part was not fixed properly and shifted during the soldering process. The shape from above was out of line, I had to correct it, creating some damages to the outer surface (it's the bad surprise). To hide it, I had to solder a piece of brass over the damaged section...I just hope that I can avoid that with the second rail.

    The last picture is showing the first finished rail and the second one has the first inner part installed.

    Before the cross members will be soldered, a good cleaning and finishing will be required.









    As usual, the time needed to construct something is all the time shorter in the mind as it is in reality. The frame is a good example! Anyway, the side members are ready; some finishing process is still needed but that will happens when all elements are soldered.

    The next step was to bore the holes for the cross members which are of various diameters and shape. The easy one (at the rear) was indeed cut too short; I had to do another one, no big deal. It is now silver soldered at the LH side rail. In the picture below, the next cross member, the one for the shock absorbers, is just inserted into the holes. Before I can solder one end, I have to fabricate and solder the studs for the shock absorbers.

    The next crossmember is just inserted into the side members, but not yet ready: there must be a dip in the middle of it. As you may be able to see, it's not a tube, but a plain piece of brass. The ends will be bored to create the illusion of a tube.

    This afternoon, I installed and soldered the large front tubes. They are linked by a smaller piece of brass, just for the temporary stability of the assembly. The inner ends will be trimmed when the rail for the front suspension are put in place.



    The crossmember # 3 was completed with a new technique (from the book "The complete car modeler #2 from Gerald Wingrove): I soldered the studs for the shock absorbers with a paste containing the soldering material. This way, I avoided too much soldering material with the associated rework. I have to say, I'm satisfied from the results. I have to, because the small bottle of 250 grams is costing about 1 $ per gram! And, like food, the product is good for one year!

    When completed, the crossmember was soldered to one rail. Then, I began the middle rail or "Y". That part is easy looking, but it's not the case. The square tube was quickly done, but the branches going at an angle gave me some trouble. The first image is showing the "Y" not yet completed, temporary installed on the front tubes.



    The other problem I had was to form the crossmember # 2: I had no tube of the correct diameter, so that part was solid at first. My bits are too short to drill it entirely; I could only drill about 40 mm deep. A large hammer was needed to bent the solid brass and, due to the large brass mass, I had to heat a long moment that part to solder it to the "Y".



    The rear part of the frame is almost ready to be assembled definitively; however, I have now to drill all the holes which are on the inner side of the rails.

    My initial idea was to solder definitively the rear part of the frame only when the front rails were inserted into the front tubes. This process is too risky, the front of the frame will be done only when the rear part is completed.
    The next steps? Finishing the crossmembers # 2 & 3.

    Some progress is to be reported to the frame. The center rail is completed, with all necessary holes. The small bracket for the emergency brake was soldered with the soldering paste; this avoids shifting the part with the soldering rod as it happens to me so many times!



    The picture above is showing that module. The bottle of my blowtorch is almost empty; I had to shuttle the bottle during soldering to increase the intensity of the heat! I cannot resist to show you this small installation.



    The last picture is showing the soldering paste. Castolin is a Swiss product, world wide known; there are probably other manufacturers of similar products.



    The paste has the same alloy than the rods I'm using, type 1802 from that manufacturer. It is liquid at about 650C; the bonding joint is stronger than the brass I'm using.

    We are now in June 2011. The last few days saw detail work on the frame. It's almost finished with the big exception of the front part, the one on which the front suspension is attached. I could now install the rear bumper, if I had it, as well as the rear springs which are also not yet born.





    With the paste I have for soldering, I could install the small brackets for the emergency brake (it will be functional, as on my 2 other models). The challenge was that the brackets had to be soldered on a round and incline surface, without possibility to temporary fix them. Fortunately, that paste gets sticky when heated and the brackets stayed in place. Another advantage of the paste is that it requires a minimum of rework; with the rod, there is usually too much material on the joint and it must be removed.


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    QUOTE QUOTE #2156

  11. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    High precision is usually needed to fabricate a chassis. My conception of precision will not please most of you but I had no other alternative!

    I suspected that the front end of the frame would present some difficulties; it did. The compound curves at the front springs are one; the location of the front members in relation to the rear of the frame is another one. Except a nice drawing from above in the '57 manual supplement, I had just the small drawing from the '56 Mark II shop manual to shape the sides of the front, with the associated approximation.

    To position the front members on the back of the frame, I took a thin cardboard, cut it at the shape I had from my drawing. The rear of the member was filed until the reference line on the cardboard was aligned with the one of the large drawing and, at the same time that the front was correctly aligned on the top of the cardboard. My guess is plus/minus 1.5 mm precision against the ideal, which translate in plus/minus 3/4" on the real car. That is not really high precision, but what else could I have done?



    The front members are also done differently than the rear of the frame. Due to the shape at the springs, I could not form the sides in a "U" shape, but all four sides are done separately. By chance, these parts are rather short…



    2 tiny pieces were prepared earlier: the front suspension domes, into which the springs are located.



    3 sides of the front rails are done; the "covers" or 4th sides are still some days away. I could temporarily attach the front rails to the frame with screws; it seems that I'm not too far away from the "truth". I will continue with the crossmembers 1 and 2 before I'm doing the 4th side. This way, I can easily correct the shape of the front rails if needed.



    As expected, the front end is not easy to do. Complex form - not at first glance - and only guessed dimensions. I hope that I will not be too far away with the dimensions because the package frame-suspension-engine is a tight one. Could be that some modifications will be needed when I will realize that I cannot close the hood because the engine is too tall!

    On the picture, you can see that the RH front rail is more or less complete and soldered to the rear. The attachment point of the shock absorber and upper arm is not yet born. The LH rail will be soldered when the second crossmember is done. I will try to shape that crossmember from a tube tomorrow; I need again a good vice to do that.



    We are now early July 2011. The front end is slowly looking better. The second crossmember was done last Saturday; it was a challenge to bend it with rather small radiuses. I did that by heating a long tube and bending by hand while a specific spot was almost red. It went better as anticipated, even if I had to do some corrections afterwards.

    The front rails are almost finished and I began to solder the huge reinforcements at the junction to the rear of the frame.





    To be completed, following elements must be added:

    the radiator's support on the front crossmember as well as the front bumper supports, the engine supports on the second crossmember, the already mentioned reinforcements and, of course, the shock absorber towers on which the front upper arms are attached.

    The junction point at the rear of frame is still a mess; this will be completed later.


    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #2157

  12. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    After the summer vacation, it's time to continue the model. Right on Monday, I went to the man owning some Mark II to measure the transmission and steering gear among the tasks of the day.

    Today (July 29, 2011), I could finish the reinforcements at the junction of the front and rear of the frame. I also added the last bracket for the emergency brake (it will be functional) near the large frame's tube # 3. The 4 brackets for the floor which are located on the top of the reinforcements have to be added; this will be the next job.





    Those 4 body supports are oddly shaped; by chance they are all identical. I did a form to have some consistent shapes. Once all supports done, the big question was: "how put the on the frame to silver solder and have all at the correct place?"

    A small aluminum fixture was fabricated; it's shown on the picture below, the parts are ready to silver solder.



    The heat to silver solder is rather high: the aluminum bar melted partially, second image. Fortunately, I could remove all the screws; there is always the danger that one gets brazed into the part which is silver soldered; this is also the reason why I used aluminum and not brass to do the fixture.



    The supports are now fixed on the frame, ready to get the floor!



    Since the last picture, some elements have been added to the frame: the front engine supports and the "towers" for the front shock absorbers and fixation points for the front suspension's upper levers. This last construction was done twice: when they were temporary installed with screws on the frame, I compared with the many pictures I have. I had the impression that the distance between the upper axle's levers and the frame was too large. Fortunately, the Swiss owner of some Mark II was at his shop and I could measure that element the next day. My parts were effectively wrong: 0.9 mm too high!

    By chance, I could rescue the dome for the shock absorbers (they are not so easy to fabricate) but had to do the other parts again as a modification was not appropriate. The wrong parts are next to the frame on the first picture before I'm discarding them for good.



    The second picture is showing the frame with the upper levers.



    I'm near from completion!


    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #2158

  13. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Again and again, Thank You! for posting these step by step pictures!
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #2159

  14. DominiqueBeerts's Avatar Avid Belgian
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    Wow!
    Best regards,
    Dominique.


    Feel free to browse through my photo albums
    QUOTE QUOTE #2160

  15. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    As you may imagine, the frame is slowly coming to completion. There are however all the small details which are added before it's too late: a bracket here, a support there...

    The front end is now finished as I added the support for the radiator and the front bumper supports, with one major exception: the outside frame rail at the idler arm has a particular form; for the moment I cannot do it because I don't know yet the angle of the arm and the distance of its mounting bracket relative to a major element of the frame. I will know it when the steering box is completed. That odd stamping will be inserted into the frame and fixed with soft solder.



    At the back, the frame was not completed: the bumper stop for the rear axle was missing; it's now soldered to the cross member, slightly off-center towards the passenger side. Is that bracket absolutely conforming to the reality? Maybe, in my application, the rear axle will not bump often to that bracket! I added also both support to the body; they are called "body support # 6". I still have to do the reinforcement at the rear of the frame for the rear hanger.



    The frame is finished, without to be totally ready. Well, there is still a form to be done at the place the bolts for the idler arm are located. First, I have to do the steering box to know where the idler arm should be located. As the frame will be put on side for some time, I decided to clean it, first in cheap vinegar to remove all traces of silver solder cleaning agent, then with sandpaper. To avoid that the surface get oxidized, I applied a good coat of primer Continental Mark II .





    By chance, I had a steering box to photograph and measure. This is again a complicated casting Continental Mark II part; on top of the form, its function is adding some complexity.

    I had the good fortune to find in my remaining parts from an other age a worm and pinion which could be usable for that purpose. The distance between axles is indeed very near to the calculated distance; sometimes compromises are necessary.

    The input and output shafts are made with brass (what else?) but I'm using steel inserts into the "casting". This will prevent to get too much play in a short period of time: brass on brass is not the best, brass on steel is much better. Hardened steel on steel is the best, but we are dealing here with a static model!

    With my weak machine, I could manage to have less than .01 mm (.0004") play between the shafts and inserts; by necessity, there will be some play between the worm and pinion, otherwise I could not turn the steering wheel.

    The box is not yet ready: some details must be added as well as the valve body. The pictured screws on the side cover will be replaced with more realistic ones when the box is ready.







    The steering gear is ready. Of course, I still need to do the Pitman arm and the universal joint at the steering shaft. Later...

    I may have to reshape the LH exhaust manifold. Its outlet is very near from the steering gear's valve body; I will see for sure when I can put the engine on the frame.







    With the attachment point for the idler arm at the outside rail, the frame is ready. There will be cosmetic improvements, but no welding anymore (unless I forgot something)!



    As I need to locate the engine on the frame, I will now continue with the transmission.

    As the box is temporary installed, I can look for the idler arm and modify the frame.


    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #2161

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