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Continental Mark II
Goal amount for this year: 518 USD, Received: 160.00 USD (31%)
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Continental Mark II Continental Mark II Continental Mark II Continental Mark II Continental Mark II
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    1. Kit: Roger Zimmermann, by (Yearly Subscriber) Roger Zimmermann is offline
      Builder Last Online: Aug 2019 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/12 Rating:  (17 votes - 5.00 average) Thanks: 25
      Started: 05-17-12 Build Revisions: Never  
      Not Supported Scratch Built

      As stated in my presentation, I'm doing since 2 years a Continental Mark II, scale 1:12. Presently, I'm doing the floor; the trunk floor is ready. The next step is going towards the front by doing the floor under the rear seat. To spare metal and unnecessary reworks, I did first a model with cardboard. Now, it will be easier to cut the brass at the proper place.


      Continental Mark II
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  1. DominiqueBeerts's Avatar Avid Belgian
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    Dominique
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    I did not point my finger to only younger people, although they have a "natural" scepsis to the elder (the good old days-talk, you know how it goes). What I really mean is that you don't ignore the creativity nor the experience of those from whom you know they have certain skills. If you do ignore that, you will end up ignorant.

    But OK, enough psycho-talk for today :-)
    Best regards,
    Dominique.


    Feel free to browse through my photo albums
    QUOTE QUOTE #2132

  2. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    It seems so easy to do! Thanks for that video, very interesting!


    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #2133

  3. happyfreddy's Avatar Active Member
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    I think to hammer a virgin sheet of metal is more difficult than when prepared by heating
    up the metal before hammering.
    And we must respect that brass is even harder than alu or copper sheets.
    Roger You have made Your experience at the Mark II and also at Toronado same as
    Markus68 did at his model. When I remember Markus made his special experience with
    first try with brass - then changed to copper.
    Perhaps You can tell us more details of hammering time.
    How many hours , are there second tries, is the sheet heating prepared ?
    I think such details are more efficient for any beginners of scratch buildings
    QUOTE QUOTE #2134

  4. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    Freddy, I explained that long ago: the roof for the Mark II was done 3 times. Of course, I did annealed the metal because after bumping it 2 times, it's getting hard. For the third roof, I switched to a softer brass quality; honestly, I did not noticed a great difference in behavior. You remember maybe that I did the trunk lid partially with copper and the hood entirely with copper; could have maybe be possible with brass.
    Don't ask how many hours, I don't know. I should also add that I did not used the hammer all the time; often I did "push" with the appropriate tool to let the brass take the shape of the wood buck.
    I learned something from the video published today: I used a hammer with a rounded head; I should have used a flatter one. I saw also that it's easier to shrink steel sheet than brass sheet!


    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #2135

  5. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    Roger Zimmermann
    Certainly not intended, but I just had a pretty long bit of 4 lnch PVC piping Continental Mark II fall on my head. Please let me know if you see any improvement in my work.

    I’m fine, got a good lump, a modeler’s lump!
    Last edited by MODEL A MODEL; 03-03-19 at 03:02 PM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #2136

  6. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Be careful Don: too much may harm!


    Continental Mark II
    Last edited by Roger Zimmermann; 03-03-19 at 04:48 AM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #2137

  7. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    With the excitation of new parts to do, I forget easily the ones which are ready, for example the wheel covers. They are still unplated, this has to be corrected. Now, all 6 covers are on a frame ready for plating. The 2 thin moldings on the picture are for the Avanti, I forgot to let plate them.
    The valve covers will be media blasted and chromed. This is the reason they are not on the same tree Continental Mark II as the wheelcovers.




    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #2138

  8. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    A November 2010 Friday, I could go to the man owning some Mark II. He lifted one of the Mark II at the front suspension/bumper and let rest the back of the car on the rear bumper, allowing me to go under the vehicle. A picture is showing the set-up.



    I could measure mostly what I was missing; I should have work now for one year!

    Even if building the frame right now is tempting because in a few hours there is a lot done, I continue for the moment with the engine. I could almost finish the transition between the front cover and the block.





    The cover is maintained with real screws, some are in front of the engine. The diameter is .8 mm (about .032"); I buy them in Germany.

    Doing the basic shape of the engine was rather quick. Now, like a Christmas tree Continental Mark II , the block must be dressed. Not with the same items as for a tree Continental Mark II but, for a model, it's like for a tree Continental Mark II : the dressing is making it nicer.

    Thanks to good pictures I got, I could do most of the small details which are added to the naked block. This morning, I added the last piece brazed on the form; the intense heat it letting melting the terminated joints which is not desirable. For this reason, the remaining small fittings will be soft soldered. The rework will be also more easy; however, the diamond tools I bought recently will not be used with the soft soldering; I will use my worn steel milling cutters.









    The holes, threaded or not, will be done later. The "decorative" ones will be done when the block is completely finished; the ones used to attach the various accessories will be done when the accessories (fuel pump, brackets for the generator, etc.) will be ready.


    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #2139

  9. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    The last detail to the block was added today (December 2, 2010). With the obvious exception of missing holes for the oil pan and engine supports, the block is ready. I don't know yet what is coming next: either water pump or the heads.





    After doing the main part of the engine, it's time to do the secondary elements; one of them is the water pump. It's a small part, easy at first glance, but not so when I began to evaluate the dimensions. Thanks to Pat Marshall from Mark II forum, I got nice pictures and one major dimension.

    The base plate was easy to do, its form is dictated by the distribution chain cover; the remaining elements were not so easy.

    One difficulty was to soft solder the reinforcement ribs, one after the other, without that the ones already finished were disturbed while the solder went liquid again on the whole part.

    Anyway, I have the impression that I did it right as you may see on the pictures. The part got a light coat of surfacer; the uniform gray color aids to reveal the intricate form. The holes in the fan hub are not yet done; I have first to do the fan and then do the bores all together.







    I also did a quick part, the oil filter, not full (it would be too easy!), to spare a bit with weight.



    Once temporary installed on the engine:




    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #2140

  10. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    An engine part in work: it's one of both cylinder heads. The second one is not far away, on the second picture it is on my huge vice.





    As both heads are identical, I can do both more or less together, trying to avoid the errors I could do on the first one. Sometimes the errors are fatal: I did some calculation errors on the base plate; I had to discard both and do new ones...

    At first, I thought that the heads will be difficult to do; in fact, they are relatively simple. Of course, there are some bumps, but nothing impossible when each detail is taken separately. Easier than the water pump!

    The form of the heads may be easy, to do them is another story! However, they are on a good way. The flanges for the intake manifold are done; I still have to do the flanges for the exhaust manifolds. To simplify the work, I have also to do the flanges for the intake and exhaust manifold when I'm doing to respective flange for the heads, otherwise it would be rather difficult to match the form more or less exactly. Flanges are bored together (the one on the head and the corresponding one for the manifold).



    The holes or passages for the intake or exhaust will not be done; it would add hours of work for nothing.

    The wheelcovers and valve covers were more than one month at the plater; I assume he was very busy! Today (December 23, 2010), I could pick-up the finished parts. I installed on a temporary basis the valve covers on the heads; the heads themselves are ready with the exception of the provision to fix the valve covers.





    I could not resist to the temptation to do some holes at the intake and exhaust flanges; it's better looking! I know that the passages are rectangular, but they will stay round.

    Another view shows the wheelcovers on the "tree"; I have to release them and put some black adhesive foil between the vanes.



    As I got nice pictures from the fan and water pump pulley, it will be the next task.


    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #2141

  11. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    It seems that it's the end of the year (I wrote this December 31, 2010); it seems also that I will not finish my engine till 2011!

    After the water pump pulley, I did the cover of the push rods. I was missing good infos on that piece; the part I did has more to do with guessing than copying. This is not that important because, when the intake manifold will be installed (it has to be constructed first) that cover is almost totally hidden. The provision to screw the cover is not yet done; the plan is that the cover will be held with two .7 mm screws (0.028").



    The black portion between the vanes of the wheelcovers is done with foil as paint is impractical to apply. Please note that I added a valve stem!



    Engines are full of difficult parts; the water pump was one of these; the part pictured is another one. It's rather strange looking: it should be an intake manifold when ready. I have many pictures from this part, unfortunately assembled on an engine, with carb and other accessories. They hide the interesting details; I'm progressing very slowly, mostly with guessing and trying.



    I had already the same difficulties with the intake manifold from the Toronado and the one from the Avanti; new engine, old story!

    The attached picture is showing the little progress I did with the intake manifold. I'm working from back to front; somewhere in the front part there will be a thermostat housing. For the moment, the housing is still in the sky!



    The four holes are just for fun or to help to identify the part...


    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #2142

  12. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Thanks to a member of the Mak II forum, I got nice pictures which helped a lot to continue the work. The manifold is almost ready; some improvements and detail work are to be added. Missing are the flanges; they will be added later.



    The intake manifold is finished (January 23, 2011); what a work load it needed! It's far from perfect; despite good pictures, sometimes I cannot catch the small difference...I will however survive: usually the hood is closed. When it's open, the air cleaner is hiding a great part of the intake manifold.



    The underside of the manifold is...like the rear of a house in Hollywood! Only the top is more or less done like the real one, the underside will never be seen, the various canals are open.

    This part is constitued with 20 or 30 tiny brass elements, silver soldered one after the other, taking care that the previous one will not shift during the heating process...

    The carb spacer and the flange of the carb are assembled on the manifold. No, the carb is not yet ready!

    Last Sunday was "repair day": I did a search in the Mark II forum for something not related and I found very nice pictures from the lifter valley's cover. I saw, but not immediately, 5 errors I did on mine! What a shame! I can accept one error, but not so many, so I reworked the part. I know that it will be barely seen, as the intake manifold mostly hide it. Anyway, the errors were corrected, some with bondo.

    Then, by looking at the pictures I took on a real Mark II last November, I noticed that my oil pump, freshly done, had also 2 errors (there are more errors I cannot correct). Well, the oil pump came for modifications after the cover...

    Now, I'm doing the oil pan; the first step is the flange as it can be seen on the attached picture, a real nice easy part. Of course, the part is more looking as a cover for the moment.



    You can also see that the engine has a crankshaft. In fact, this is just a piece of brass on which the pulley will be installed.

    The feet under the cylinder head are the pedestals on which the valve covers will be attached.

    After the flange was done, the obvious element to do was a wood form as step two, and to hammer some brass on it. It was not as quick as I thought, but what is quickly done on a model? Then, when the shape was acceptable, the flange was silver soldered together with the new part.

    According to the pictures I have from a real oil pan, the shape is more or less correct; it may not be absolutely correct dimension wise as there is a lot of guessing by looking at the pictures.

    On the attached picture, you can see the wood form and the oil pan at step 3.



    Step 4: Another small wood form was used to shape the strange lower lip from the oil pan. This was done because the engine sit lower than regular Lincolns. With this shape, the same quantity of oil could be used as in the standard Lincoln engines.

    After the shape was right, the part was silver soldered to the main element. As you can see, the upper part is looking like a flange and not like a flat lid.



    A modified wood form was used at step 5, to shape the bottom part of the oil pan. The main job is done; I have now to do the holes for the external line going to the oil pump and the screw to evacuate the oil; still a couple of hours to play with that part.




    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #2143

  13. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    Roger Zimmermann
    Hello Roger, can you recall how many pieces you soldered together to make the oil pan?

    I think I see six?
    QUOTE QUOTE #2144

  14. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    You could be right, I don't remember. I believe that the original one is done with 2 pieces; I had to do more steps. Maybe with the same tooling as the real pan, (but 1:12 of course) I could have done that also in 2 pieces. However, the brass has not the appropriate characteristic for a deep pressing. For that, steel is better.


    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #2145

  15. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Just for the fun, I'm showing the finished oil pan, temporary attached to the engine, with the external oil line.

    With a little bit of paint, such parts are looking better. There are still imperfections; they will be corrected just before the final paint. This is not for the moment!





    Another small part is done: the water outlet, sitting on top of the intake manifold. The small tube going to the water pump is the by-pass tube; I did it in copper because this material is easier to bend and rebend than brass. This tube has a rather shape: it must clear the crankcase oil filler tube as well as the bracket for the A/C compressor. These elements are not yet ready, maybe I will have to correct again the shape of the tube…



    Before I did the Avanti, I had a pretty good stock of round brass, in various diameters. Nothing is lasting forever, not my brass stock! I had to order a bunch last week; it will be available early this week.

    Due to that shortage, I could not continue with the distributor. Jobless? No! In my garage, I have a nice upper front suspension lever, on loan from the man having 3 Mark II. I have enough (for the moment) flat brass, let's do it! I was taking dimensions from that lever when I had an urgent need to see a frame picture and I discovered that the lever is not the right one.

    Back to the documents I have, like the page 19 from the 1957 "Service Information" for Lincolns and Continental. I already discovered that this sketch is exactly 10 times smaller than the real car. I did a print and oh miracle, the printer did a copy which is exactly 1.2 times smaller than the page I scanned!

    Sure, there is certainly a small percentage of error, but it goes in less than 1 hundredth of an inch.

    The upper suspension lever is the easiest one I did (Ok, it's the third one in my life) and the pair was quickly done.

    This picture is showing the formed vertical elements for 2 levers and the flanges.



    On this image, you can see one arm more or less finished; the outer contours are to be refined, plus the begin of the second arm.



    The pair is finished in this picture. I just need to bore the holes for the shaft and the ones for the upper ball joint.



    Both upper suspension arms are now ready with shaft and bushings. Missing are the ball joints; they will be done later when the frame is done. Of course, the suspension and steering will be working; therefore ball joints are a necessity.



    February 15, 2011, I bought for about $ 70.00 rund brass in various diameters; it should be enough to finish the model!


    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #2146

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