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    1. Kit: Roger Zimmermann, by (Yearly Subscriber) Roger Zimmermann is offline
      Builder Last Online: Jul 2019 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/12 Rating:  (17 votes - 5.00 average) Thanks: 25
      Started: 05-17-12 Build Revisions: Never  
      Not Supported Scratch Built

      As stated in my presentation, I'm doing since 2 years a Continental Mark II, scale 1:12. Presently, I'm doing the floor; the trunk floor is ready. The next step is going towards the front by doing the floor under the rear seat. To spare metal and unnecessary reworks, I did first a model with cardboard. Now, it will be easier to cut the brass at the proper place.


      Continental Mark II
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  1. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    The first picture is showing how I'm milling the sides of the tang. I cannot use the disc used in the last picture from the previous message, because the machine is not precise enough and that milling tool's teeth are not perpendicular to the face. With a small diameter tool, I can better see what's happening.



    Then I'm cutting the vane from the ground material




    This is the end result. The lower brass part is now scrap.



    The vanes are not yet ready: the ends have to be trimmed at an angle.

    When all the parts are ready up to that point, I can trim the ends. After that, each vane is fitted to the wheelcover; this last task showed me that I have to modify a little bit the position of the tab on the next vanes batch.





    After the trimming was done, each vane is sanded and polished. Not an easy task with such small parts, but it can be done.

    Then, the soldering of the vanes can begin!
    


    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #2117

  2. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    The first wheelcover was finished a late afternoon. Oh boy, what a task! Clearly, I underestimated the time needed for the construction. Each vane needs about 1 hour, from milling the ground shape to the soldering. The wheelcovers of the Toronado and the Avanti were indeed much simpler…







    Some days after, 4 wheelcovers were now ready. Enough for the car, but I still have 2 empty "dishes" requesting their vanes. After the second wheelcover, to mill all those vanes is really boring.



    To polish the vanes, there is just one method: to pinch them between 2 nails and rub them on 3 different sanding Continental Mark II papers: 400, 1200 and finally on a sanding Continental Mark II paper I don't know the grade. I have almost no nails anymore...I'm glad it's over soon!

    A completed wheelcover together with a wheel & tire. The wheels are still unpainted and of course the wheelcover will be chrome plated Continental Mark II .




    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #2118

  3. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    A missing vane? No! the empty slot will get the LAST vane! Yes, the wheelcovers are ready! At the time you will read this, the holes for the tire valve are done. I intended to solder a valve from the back of the wheelcover but I will attach the valve after the plating is done.



    Most of my nails are either broken or sanded; the polishing of the last vanes was rather difficult...

    The next task? It will be the air cleaner. Just ONE piece, rather easy to do. I would prefer to begin the frame, but the Swiss man who has some Mark II is very busy; maybe I can go to his place in November to measure a frame.


    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #2119

  4. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    On the air cleaner, there is the word "FRONT" embossed on top of the cleaner body. I intend to add this detail to my air cleaner so I began today with some milling (see the picture). You don't see a lot? Me neither, the letters are really tiny: 1.3 mm high. I'm not yet sure if I can succeed; the answer in a few days!



    The top part of the air cleaner is done (in 2 pieces) and I could do the FRONT letters. Boy they are small! Some are good, others, like the "O" will need some rework when soldered on the top of the air cleaner. Anyway, as they are not constantly under the nose of the viewer, they could be acceptable as they are.



    I have to solder the letters before I'm loosing them!

    I soldered the letters the day after; while doing this, I lost the "N" while holding it with tweezers. Of course, I search almost everywhere: in my hair (still have them), on clothes, on the floor, on the desk, no N. I decided to solder the backing part (letters are done that way: a piece of .3mm brass is soldered on another piece of 1mm, the assembly is milled entirely). Suddenly, something was shining on the desk: the N! From where it came from? Those damn things have sometimes their own life.





    I did also the bottom part of the air cleaner as shown on the pictures. Is the air cleaner ready? Not quite: I have to install the air duct guide as well as the recesses for the thermostat housing and A/C fast idle speed-up control. The definitive form will be done once the engine is ready.


    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #2120

  5. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    I had to put the air cleaner on side for the moment as it can only be finished when the engine is ready, because of the tight fit of the air intake.

    As the Swiss man who owns several Mark II has no time for the moment, I cannot measure a frame from one of his cars. Therefore, I'm beginning the engine. With the number of illustrations found in the shop manual (sorry, the technical data book), plus the pictures I took in June as well as the dimensions I measured on a real engine, I had the impression that it would be an easy task to establish the basic dimensions.

    It is not: either my measures are not correct or the drawings in the technical data are inconsistent. The chase to details is also not an easy task: there is no picture of the engine block from the RH front or LH rear! My pictures are also mostly useless: most details are hidden behind the dirt of the removed engines I could photograph.

    Anyhow, I began the fundamental work: the 4 sides plus bottom, see the pictures. Does not look like a Lincoln or Continental engine? Wait a little bit! I can add some details wich will improve greatly that first step.





    The engine is slowly taking shape. I'm spending almost more time to study the various documents I have than the construction itself!

    Anyway, I think I'm on the right way; details of the sides of the engine are still confuse; maybe I will find someday the right pictures.

    The attached pictures are showing the block from behind. No, there will be no pistons; the holes are just for fun! The hole for the lifter valley is not yet done; I still cannot determine it's length.





    When the rear is done (more or less well), the efforts have to be directed at the front of the engine. The front cover is a real nice part, an easy one in my mind. So easy? not quite! I had many hours invested in that tiny brass part. I began on the wrong side as I should have done the flange of the water pump first. I did more mistakes, all corrected since (brass is a very nice material to work with).

    What next? Between the cover and the block, there is a cast part doing the bridge and on which the cover/water pump is installed. That will be the next part. The bores for the screws will be done all together. I have nice .8 mm screws for that job!




    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #2121

  6. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    Roger Zimmermann
    I think that your posts are the best education that a model maker can have!

    The creation of your engine, these first foundational steps, are so simple and so important, and show by omission, how much imagination you have.

    Looking at the engine block as it is and seeing down the road what it will become.

    Your work is also a testament to slow and steady wins the race!

    -Don
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #2122

  7. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Thanks for your comments! I would add something to all scratch modelers: even if you are sure about a dimension from an engine or any large component, do it a tad smaller, like 2%. You will be happy later because you will have less interferences!
    Unfortunately, I did it not that way and I began to sweat when I saw that the hood will bump on the air cleaner!


    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #2123

  8. Jo NZ's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger Zimmermann
    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Zimmermann View Post
    even if you are sure about a dimension from an engine or any large component, do it a tad smaller, like 2%. You will be happy later because you will have less interferences!
    I have been learning that the hard way! My brain tells me that if it is a little large, I can always make it smaller, which is easier than adding material. I need to follow the 2% rule...
    QUOTE QUOTE #2124

  9. markus68's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    "I think that your posts are the best education that a model maker can have!"
    I agree with Don. Markus
    QUOTE QUOTE #2125

  10. Jo NZ's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    ^^^^ wot he said^^^^

    Jo
    QUOTE QUOTE #2126

  11. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    Thanks for the comments! Maybe I had the wrong profession; what about educator?! It could be too late!


    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #2127

  12. happyfreddy's Avatar Active Member
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    freddy
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    Hi Roger,
    Itīs never too late ..... really.
    Simply think about the long time of life to make any experience !
    If the conclusion to be a former educator in young age You have no or less
    experience made. Young people only have theoretical experience by reading
    books but never in practise. Iīll think You will also agree that people in
    older age learn every day new things : the whole life is a learning process.
    .... and a important part of this theme is listen to that what older people
    will tell, based on their own experience made in their life.
    Thanks for You detailled reports here. Iīve learned very much for my own project
    QUOTE QUOTE #2128

  13. DominiqueBeerts's Avatar Avid Belgian
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    Most important lesson in life: when certain people say something, you'd better listen. because that is when valuable information is shared.
    Best regards,
    Dominique.


    Feel free to browse through my photo albums
    QUOTE QUOTE #2129

  14. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    Ah! Freddy, I would never work as a professional educator. It's just not my ding. If what I'm showing can be seen as an education, it's just a side effect!
    To Dominique: don't you have the impression that young people are just ignoring what the older people say? (laissons radoter le vieux!)


    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #2130

  15. happyfreddy's Avatar Active Member
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    freddy
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    Roger , I think those problems with younger people are selfmade in most of the chef
    floors....
    Because often young people just finished their studies with bestnotes and "many years of
    work experience" are wanted. A newbie canīt have any experience working in industrie
    or any kind of work, he just has to learn many things of professional work.
    Perhaps the are very fit in construction via computer and CNC. But all things made by
    hand without computer they only had some internship for some weeks .
    In those weeks they only can learn some basics but never working day for day in that
    matter.
    If You regard this video You will see , itīs a older guy again who tells and shows the
    newbies how to do and not to do shaping metal to get the wanted fender



    Those vids show more facts than You can read in any book
    Last edited by happyfreddy; 03-01-19 at 07:28 PM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #2131

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