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    1. Kit: Roger Zimmermann, by (Yearly Subscriber) Roger Zimmermann is offline
      Builder Last Online: Feb 2019 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/12 Rating:  (17 votes - 5.00 average) Thanks: 24
      Started: 05-17-12 Build Revisions: Never  
      Not Supported Scratch Built

      As stated in my presentation, I'm doing since 2 years a Continental Mark II, scale 1:12. Presently, I'm doing the floor; the trunk floor is ready. The next step is going towards the front by doing the floor under the rear seat. To spare metal and unnecessary reworks, I did first a model with cardboard. Now, it will be easier to cut the brass at the proper place.


      Continental Mark II
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  1. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    Thanks Don! This small refreshing will come here too, but first I would like to complete the Mark II story; two years are missing here. As I have only one head and 2 hands, it will take some time!


    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #2057

  2. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    I came here in 2012. At that time, the Mark II model was already 2 years old (if we can say it that way!) Those 2 years are missing here; Daniel began some time ago to copy/paste what I did either in the Mark II forum or in the AACA one. This will be what I'm doing now. Maybe Daniel or another administrator could put the beginning where it belongs: to the beginning! Of course, it will not take 2 years to complete the report; I will add new posts on a regular basis.
    I came here in 2012. At that time, the Mark II model was already 2 years old (if we can say it that way!) Those 2 years are missing here; Daniel began some time ago to copy/paste whet I did either in the Mark II forum or in the AACA one. This will be what I'm doing now. Maybe Daniel or another administrator could put the beginning where it belongs: at the beginning!

    February 3, 2010 was the begin with this mad project: the construction of a Continental Mark II, scale 1:12, from scratch. Indeed, the project began earlier, gathering as many pictures as I could, buying some books and corresponding with some of the members of the Mark II forum. Feb. 3 was the physical begin: I will do first the rims. Strange choice isn't? there is a reason for that: my previous model, a 1963 Studebaker Avanti is almost ready. I'm doing now the tires for this Avanti and, as expected, there are difficulties. Furthermore, time is needed for the material to cure Continental Mark II (about 24 hours) and I hate to wait and do nothing.

    The rims for the Mark II are standard parts (more or less) which have to be done anyway. Then I will do the tires for the Mark II as my notices and experience with the Avanti tires will be helpful.

    I did the same work with the tires for my first model (a 1966 Olds Toronado) but it was for 30 years and the products are no more the same.

    I hope you will enjoy this adventure; you must be patient as progress are never quick.

    Attached are 2 pictures. You may notice that my lathe is very small and the brass part is looking huge for this small machine!





    We are in March, 2010:

    The begin of this model is not quite exciting; the frame would be more interesting. This will come, later.

    The long cylinder was precut to have 5 drums.



    The final cut was done manually with a saw blade as obviously it was not possible with my small machine to completely cut each drum on the lathe.



    Then came the regular work as a picture is showing it.







    When the first rim was done, my desk was covered with brass chips! Fortunately, it's easy to clean, and yes, I do it myself.



    Now, I still have four rims to do....


    Continental Mark II
    Last edited by Roger Zimmermann; 02-09-19 at 12:14 PM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #2058

  3. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    The date is March 5, 2010.
    I finished the last rim on February 9. 5 rims are now ready to be assembled on the wheel's centers, when they will be done. For that, I will have to take dimensions from the cars located in Switzerland; it will not happens before 2 months.



    The next step will be the tire's pattern. I ordered a bit of brass; next week I will begin with it. The first step with the Avanti tires are promising; let see what happens next.

    Some time ago, I began the work on the pattern for the tires. It will be made with brass, a metal I like. Easy to turn, no need to lubricade, easy to braze and soft sold.

    The pattern is, for the small machine I have, a huge piece of brass, 1.25 kg heavy (about 2.8 pounds). As one of the pictures is showing it, it looks disproportionate on the lathe. It's time consuming; not only because I can take only a little bit material each time, but after about 20 minutes the electric motor of the machine must cool down…



    The next picture is showing that there is already some progress, but it's far from finished.



    The work on the tire's pattern is going faster than anticipated. The tire's back side (picture) is almost ready. The tool to form the sides is a flat chisel. It cut into brass almost like butter! Of course, the chisel is held by hand; this technique requires some habit.

    At the moment, the weight is less than half it was at the beginning.



    The date is March 6, 2010

    In parallel to the tire pattern for the Mark II, I did the tires for the Avanti, finishing that model. I can now continue the saga with the tires for the Mark II. On the picture, you can see the "tire" and some brass bands. What can those bands to have in common with the pattern?





    The answer tomorrow if nobody could find the reason!


    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #2059

  4. DominiqueBeerts's Avatar Avid Belgian
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    Dominique
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    Ypu create the pattern with the brass bands on top of the solid drum?
    Best regards,
    Dominique.


    Feel free to browse through my photo albums
    QUOTE QUOTE #2060

  5. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    Exactly, Dominique! As I explained the other day, I'm just doing a copy/paste from the AACA forum. I'm modifying the text if something is not relevant; the question I wrote 9 years ago remained. For that reason, I did not expect to have an answer.


    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #2061

  6. DominiqueBeerts's Avatar Avid Belgian
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    Dominique
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    Oh, Lucky I guessed it right then. I have never read the thread on AACA …
    Sorry about that ...
    Best regards,
    Dominique.


    Feel free to browse through my photo albums
    QUOTE QUOTE #2062

  7. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    Quote Originally Posted by DominiqueBeerts View Post
    I have never read the thread on AACA …
    Sorry about that ...
    Don't be sorry, you cannot be or see everything!


    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #2063

  8. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    Very nice of you Roger, to do this! There are so many ways to do things, so many different materials and techniques. -if after all this work, if after all these years, if you have had second thoughts about a material, or a technique, please tell. -You have gone so much farther than most of us. (All of us!)

    When you were making the floor panels, (I know, not yet!) (When you get to that) When you were making the floor panels, did you find that making your cuts exactly where they were made in manufacturing by Continental, made it easier to form? -or were your decisions to "cut here and not there" of your own choosing and needs?

    -Don

    PS- Where I work, one of our most important jobs, is the rebuilding of a specialist car. -(A restoration to a point, and an enhancement). This is done to mass-produced bodies, and on those, as we have them, one can see all the myriad smaller panels that are assembled to make the larger, and all of those that are then assembled to make the whole. (It's too bad I am not interested in this particular car, as I have a very good opportunity to document the body in a way that few would have.) Walking past these day after day I do often stop to examine all the bits and pieces, and marvel at all the work some engineer and tooling men must have done to create these bodies.
    Last edited by MODEL A MODEL; 02-10-19 at 01:42 PM.
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #2064

  9. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    Quote Originally Posted by MODEL A MODEL View Post

    When you were making the floor panels, (I know, not yet!) (When you get to that) When you were making the floor panels, did you find that making your cuts exactly where they were made in manufacturing by Continental, made it easier to form? -or were your decisions to "cut here and not there" of your own choosing and needs?
    When I was at the floor, I studied a length the various pictures I had. I found that this floor was done partly in a way I would do it with my limited tooling. I had anyway to do things differently: for example, the floor for the trunk is a one stamped part. I had to do it in at least 3 parts silver soldered. I did it shorter towards the rear seat, I don't remember why. The main floor is a 2-pieces stamped affair spot welded at the rear of the front seat platform. In my case, I did a myriad of parts silver soldered together but the whole contour is similar to the real floor.
    I don't know if my answer is clear enough for you. Explanations in foreign language is always hard to me!


    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #2065

  10. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    Thanks Roger,

    Why I asked, was that, while I am trying to make progress on my own model, the front cross-member is giving me some battle. I am trying to make it in one "stamped" piece, as was done by Ford, but I may have to make it in two. Unlike your Continental's or Markus's Mercedes, the Ford Model A chassis was designed to be massed produced, and in as fast a manner as possible. (two thousand a day?) Hence the single part stamped as one, with very large radiuses and sort of a sloppy look. In a smaller scale, it might look tighter, but it would not, and should not look as beautiful as your two models.

    I am busy at my "day job", but I try to put an hour or two each day on my model, or right now, on "how to make, my model" Patterns, attempts. learning new techniques, . . .

    I continue to show your work to friends, and always when I review what you have done, I see your talent for working. And tenacity! You probably were good at tug-a-wars when you were a kid!

    Thanks again! -Don
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #2066

  11. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    If you have dies in steel and a 500 tons press, you can do it in one piece. If you have limited tooling, do like everybody else: in several pieces, soldered together!


    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #2067

  12. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    The date is March 7, 2010.
    As Dominique guessed, the band will be milled and fixed on the blank. This is a long process, you will see later how this is done. If I had a sophisticated equipment, I would mill the tread directly on the blank. Would that be fun?

    For the name and dimension, it will not be done the same way. There is another procedure, again completely foolish.

    To be honest, I did not "invent" the process to make tires. I got it from a book I bought in Reno at the famous museum in 1979 if I remember well. The book is: The complete car modeller from Gerald A. Wingrove. He must get the credit for it.

    Those who follow the construction of this new model must be patient: the planning go from 6 to 10 years…

    Up to now, you saw only my fingers. During summertime, they would no be so clean as I'm working from time to time to my real cars. But how is looking that funny guy from Switzerland?

    As the publisher from Studebaker toys asked for pictures, we did some this morning. Here is one at the "working" place…




    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #2068

  13. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    Hello Roger,

    I used to sell Unimat 3s, did quite well with them selling a dozen or so a year, but if your work was known back then? Your progress certainly shows what can be done! -Many modelers search for the "Perfect" tools, without mastering any. (I know what I'm talking about!)

    Thank you for taking the time to include these earlier postings!

    -Don
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #2069

  14. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    Did you sell them in the US?
    No, I was totally unknown! I began to publish my stories about 15 years ago.
    The perfect machine? It's this one: you think about a product or part and 5 minutes later the machine is spitting it at your feet (or hands)!


    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #2070

  15. happyfreddy's Avatar Active Member
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    freddy
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    Roger , no machine is perfect even when well constructed in any details.
    But itīs really interesting to see what is able when using such a small machine. But many
    people say when buing a lathe take a great one, You soon will see itīs too small.
    I think the most important reason is to work sitting at a table even with such small parts.

    Donīt worry about some parts being spittet. Those parts only follow as known the " Murphy laws ".
    The only thing you must do when working is to protect Your eyes using glases.

    Thanks for the ealier pictures of Your project.
    QUOTE QUOTE #2071

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