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    1. Kit: Roger Zimmermann, by (Yearly Subscriber) Roger Zimmermann is online now
      Builder Last Online: Dec 2018 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/12 Rating:  (16 votes - 5.00 average) Thanks: 24
      Started: 05-17-12 Build Revisions: Never  
      Not Supported Scratch Built

      As stated in my presentation, I'm doing since 2 years a Continental Mark II, scale 1:12. Presently, I'm doing the floor; the trunk floor is ready. The next step is going towards the front by doing the floor under the rear seat. To spare metal and unnecessary reworks, I did first a model with cardboard. Now, it will be easier to cut the brass at the proper place.


      Continental Mark II
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  1. happyfreddy's Avatar Active Member
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    freddy
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    Gratulation Roger very well made !! chapeau
    QUOTE QUOTE #1922

  2. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    Continental Mark II
    Thanks Freddy!

    Once the wiring was ready, it was time to hide it under the carpet. I don’t have large hands, but working into the model is not especially easy. I had to shorten the LH kick panel at the bottom. Once in place the question was if I could attach it to the body with the 2 foreseen screws? The slot on those screws is not very deep and the position of the screwdriver is very impractical. First, I searched with a tiny drill bit if the foreseen holes would correspond with the attaching brackets at the body. I did not believe it, but they did! Usually, a couple of seconds is needed to tighten those screws if the setting is right; here I had maybe one hour. For 2 screws!





    The next step was the front seat installation. It was already in the model, I saw no difficulties and it would be done rather quickly. Unfortunately, the reality was very different: I had 3 afternoons to install it! The seat is attached with 4 bolts inserted from under the body. They have to go through the carpet into the nuts from the seat rails. When the seat is into the car, the sight is just zero. So, I prepared 4 studs long enough to go through the carpet and the floor; the studs were screwed into the seat tracks. When one was emerging at the underbody, I secured it with a nut, pushing then on the seat to let the remaining go through the holes. Then, I undid the studs one after the other to use the foreseen bolts. I managed to break one bolt, requiring the removal of the seat to remove the broken bit. After a second similar adventure, I realized that the carpet was the culprit because the attaching points are offset, putting too much stress on the bolts. What to do? The removal of the carpet under the track was out of question; I should have removed the whole carpet but the door scuff plates were glued on the body and the carpet in sandwiched between the scuff plates and body. I did 4 spacers and began again the installation. I just saw that with the spacers the studs were now too short. OK, 4 new longer studs are quickly made. With longer studs the pre-installation of the seat should be easier because I could more or less see the holes on the floor, but it was not! One stud had no envy to go where I wanted, even with some persuasion and chosen words. Finally I was stronger and I could install the bolts. Success! Well, not exactly: the seat was lower on one side. Nevertheless, I tried to install the seat motor. It is attached to the floor with 4 nuts. 2 went well, but 2 could not be screwed in most probably because too much paint was on the thread.
    The seat had to come out once again. This time, I checked the distance between the attaching points; it was about 1 mm too narrow, maybe the frame was deformed when I tried to insert the studs. I did the correction which was easy as all was soft soldered. At the same time, I cleaned the threads for the motor.
    New tentative: the studs can now be inserted with ease and the motor is now correctly attached. I had the pleasure to see that the seat was functioning; the seat was at the same “altitude” on both sides, but it was crooked! The seat came out again, but the motor stayed in place. I corrected the tracks to have them square and installed the seat again. Once the connecting rod from the motor was definitively attached to the seat, I could close that chapter!





    Finally, I put the decal Continental Mark II representing the patent plate (Fomoco designation).



    Practically, the main body is ready with the exception of the windshield and back window, plus the associated chromed parts. The next step will be the inserting of the door strap links, if I can do that. It will be similar to catch a fly with closed eyes: the hole for the shaft is barely visible; see the arrow at the last picture. Maybe I will have to plan a long installation time!




    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #1923

  3. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    Continental Mark II
    Frankly, I was not very optimistic about the strap links. To maximise the chance of success, I did a cone at the pin to facilitate the insertion, assuming that the hole from the link would more or less align with the ones from the pillar. I also silver soldered a strap at the other end of the pin for the same purpose. After a while, the pin & strap disappeared into the pillar! It will stay here: to rescue it, I should remove the dash, which is out of question.
    I did a new pin and strap, this time longer as to be able to guide it with the hand. On the RH side, I could see the link when I illuminating the place with a torch. After a while and many tentatives, the pin went into the catch! I cut the excess from the strap and glued the remaining to the body. It was time to go to the other side. Even if I tried to construct the body the same way both sides, I saw nothing at the LH hole. After some hours, suddenly the pin went into the link! Again, some glue secured the strap. The LH is less effective than the RH; anyway, now I can have open doors without holding them. And, as intended, the doors are held at two distinct positions as you can see on the pictures.
    Now, I can “play” with the front clip.






    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #1924

  4. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    Looking beautiful!
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #1925

  5. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    Thanks Don!
    Still on a temporary job or do you found something else?


    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #1926

  6. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    Hi Roger!

    Thanks for asking, you are a good friend! and,

    Yes, I am week to week, and still sending in applications and making portfolios. A new start-up that had been hiring and paying very well, just laid off a bunch of people locally, so the competition for my kind of work just got worse.

    Back to you, have you seen some of the self-published books that people are making? I have one from Marshall Buck on his Ferrari scratch built Continental Mark II , and the book from Manuel Olive Sans, and both are pretty nice. The way it works is to get some commitments up front and have those and a few others printed. Here in the states it is a process conducted at the "better" camera shops. It is actually just a whole bunch of your photographs printed and bound together. Text can be minimal or whatever you would be up to.

    It might be a way for you to finance your next model or buy some expensive wine?

    I'm sure between this and a few of the other forums that you are a part of, you could get many sales!

    $50-$60 per book, maybe more? Twenty or so pages.

    Maybe something to consider in a few years, after your finally done.
    Last edited by MODEL A MODEL; 11-14-18 at 08:14 PM.
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #1927

  7. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    Hi Don
    I supposed that your dear president was looking for jobs…
    If you went to the AACA forum, you maybe saw that someone wanted to do a book about this model. He was at time very prolific with messages; now that the model is nearing the completion he is rather silent. If his project was serious, fine, he will manage the whole thing. If not, I'm doing nothing.
    The next model? I decided there will be none. I will just improve the Toronado which is indeed not 100% ready: the electrical was not finished and the electrical front seat is dead. It never function very well because the rails are indeed 2 tubes with a rod inside. If the assembly is not perfectly aligned, it jams. I will do a better system on that model and finish the electrical system.


    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #1928

  8. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    Oh! Good to hear.

    Returning to your Toronado, will be very interesting! It is also another car that I admire. -and you have done such a very nice job of it as well.

    That's in the future, and you'll be finishing the Mark II for now. But when the time comes, it will be just as interesting!

    -Don
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #1929

  9. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    Continental Mark II
    Well, Don, you see I'm not yet totally away!

    Without the front clip, the model is looking far away from completion. To change this look dramatically, I just had to add the hood and both front fenders. To add some stability, the lower air deflector was installed. I did know that it was a tight fit around the radiator cradle and frame; this time I had to use some persuasion to get it in place. Later I understood why: on the sides, it must go under the fender construction; I managed to put it on top of that lip! I saw that when I wanted to install the screws at the flange: they were not at all aligned. Fortunately, with some more persuasion, the air deflector came out. Once correctly guided, it went in place without problem; I just had to repair the black paint which was damaged during the wrong installation process.
    The exhaust tubes are also installed; could I now install the grille and front bumper? No, I must first do the missing hoses for the air conditioning system. The fresh air tube for the air cleaner was done since a long time; unfortunately, it’s too short! It will not takes weeks or months to do another one; I just don’t understand why I did not it longer than necessary and cut the excess…




    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #1930

  10. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    Continental Mark II
    A nasty cold let me down for 10 days; fortunately, as I’m almost finished with the model, I did not care too much. When I got better, I could begin the last few hoses for the A/C. 2 are done, one still has to go. To install the one going from the compressor to the condenser, I had to remove the panel holding the hood lock. This picture is showing the condenser before panel and grille will hide it.



    I imagined that the installation of this panel and grille would go in 5 minutes. Oh na´ve I’m! Something was jamming: the “horns” from the lower grille molding were preventing the grill to go high enough. When the grille and panel were attached with a few bolts, the assembly pushed the front clip on one side, the hood was not closing properly…I had to remove the lower molding from the grille and see what happens: all good! When presenting the molding to the installed grille, I saw that some holes were no more aligned. I suppose that the several coats of paint are thick enough to upset the original fitting.
    To elongate the holes was not a big deal, that place is unseen.



    Once the grille and upper panel were definitively assembled with 10 bolts, I could attach the modified molding with 10 more screws. This time, the support I did long ago was very helpful: the model is not moving during the assembly and the paint well protected.
    With the car upside-down, it was the opportunity to install the front bumper. Fortunately, I prepared long before a tool to tighten the nuts; it was also used for the rear bumper.



    A last task had to be done before the car is back on its wheels: connect the parking lamps with the headlamps. As the frame and bumper supports had a good coat of paint, I was not sure it the circuit for the parking lamps would be closed; fortunately, it was! OK, the illumination is rather weak; it’s just for the show.



    The last picture is showing how the model is getting the current: through the filler tube…Not very spectacular, but again, it’s just for the show.




    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #1931

  11. Jo NZ's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Jo
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    Roger Zimmermann
    I continue to be amazed, Roger, it's difficult to believe that the model is 1/12 scale and not full size.
    As the wiring goes through the filler tube, how about disguising it as a filler hose? The battery box could be a petrol pump...
    QUOTE QUOTE #1932

  12. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jo NZ View Post
    As the wiring goes through the filler tube, how about disguising it as a filler hose? The battery box could be a petrol pump...
    Thanks Jo. You have a good idea with the fuel pump!


    Continental Mark II
    QUOTE QUOTE #1933

  13. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    The "filler" nozzle could be a small audio jack, or other power end, available at most electronics shops, with it's reciever in the the fill tube?


    AND,


    I agree with everybody! In your first photo from this last group, except for the workbench, and surroundings, there is nothing of your model that gives it away as a model!!!!!
    Last edited by MODEL A MODEL; 11-28-18 at 02:32 PM.
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #1934

  14. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    Hello Roger,

    Your work really is SO nice!

    I noticed that your model is large enough that your camera needs a deeper depth of focus. Perhaps stepping down the aperture? -(I think that's what someone told me), but , whatever.

    An excellent model! Truly something to be proud of!!!!

    Don
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #1935

  15. Egon's Avatar Moderator
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    egon
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    Spectacular and gratulation on neer the end, but you need more juice on the battery if you want to activate the windows at the same time, maybe all the acid ran out of the battery when you had it upside down.
    QUOTE QUOTE #1936

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