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    1. Kit: , by (VIP/Sponsor) xken is offline
      Builder Last Online: Jun 2019 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/8 Rating:  (24 votes - 4.71 average) Thanks: 0
      Started: 02-15-09 Build Revisions: Never  
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      This build will be intended to aquaint those interested in working with brass. I will also keep it simple so as no sophisticated equipment is required. Everything will be hand built with hand tools. So of course if you have equipment you can build quicker. This will be a 1/8th scale Model T racer when completed. I have a picture posted in another thread. And I will find tune as I post.

      Here is getting started by cutting out the profile of the side rails. You need real good light to cut down the scribe line. Once cut out the side rail may have some curl from cutting, very carefully with just your fingers form it back to flat slowly and carefully. The rails were layed out on 1" x 12" x.016" brass sheet. The angles were 3/16" x 36" x.016". When all soldered together the side walls will be 1/32" thick with the return flanges being .016. Working with brass is like playing chess; you have to plan ahead right down to buying your materials. Build the part in you head first step by step, then buy what you need, materials, tools etc.



      Here is soldering the side rails to top angles. The secret to soldering is letting your iron get real hot Article: 1/8th Scale Model T Racer Build Journal , touch it to the solder end to gather a puddle on the iron and then to the joint. Remember solder will always flow to heat and since it is liquid is subject to the laws of gravity.
      I apply the liquid flux with a paint brush to the entire joint before soldering. The tempurature is correct when the solder flows freely into the joint. The spring clamps also provide handles to hold the piece while soldering.



      Here is a closeup of the above picture.



      Here is a shot of adding the rail extension since stock sheet was too short. Needed another 11/16". Once finished up the joint is barely visible and I put this to the rear of the chassis where it will be less obvious anyway.



      Here is how to file the bottom angle to fit the side rail. Double sided carpet tape works great to hold small pieces. I would recommend buying a steel block if you do not have one. I think MicroMark offers one. Also handy to hammer some parts back to flat. Be careful to slowly remove the part from the tape so as not to bend or distort the piece. The tape adhesive works well in holding it in place.



      Here is the bottom angle cut and filed to fit. Working with brass requires patience and a good assortment of files.



      Here is how to remove excess solder. Scrape Article: 1/8th Scale Model T Racer Build Journal , file, sand Article: 1/8th Scale Model T Racer Build Journal and polish. Note: Blades are stamped out as a result one edge is rounded down while the other has a sharp edge. Use the sharp edge to scrape Article: 1/8th Scale Model T Racer Build Journal . You can easilly tell the difference when you try to scrape Article: 1/8th Scale Model T Racer Build Journal .



      Here is the finished left rail.



      Now to finish up the right side. Then the next installment will be the crossmenbers.
      Please feel free to post questions, and there is no such thing as a stupid question.

      Ken


      Article: 1/8th Scale Model T Racer Build Journal

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      Article: 1/8th Scale Model T Racer Build Journal-modelt-gif 


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  1. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Kenneth
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    Since this is my first car that I have built and I have good photos so far. A friend is in contact with the owner which I think is the Gilmore museum in Michigan. Perhaps the next one could be that one. That is a pretty brass body for sure.



    Article: 1/8th Scale Model T Racer Build Journal-04-085-jpg


    Article: 1/8th Scale Model T Racer Build Journal
    Last edited by xken; 09-01-11 at 07:14 AM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #32

  2. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    I'm really enjoying this. I'm learning a heck of a lot here. Thanks Ken.
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #33

  3. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Kenneth
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    Nice pictures of dash and steering wheel. Keep posting pictures I need all the help I can get. Also I just posted a picture of the chassis back in installment #4. Shows the overall view.

    Dan, geeting back to your question about the video, I do not have the equipment to do that. However, are you using a 100 watt plug in iron. It can take up to 10 minutes to get the iron hot Article: 1/8th Scale Model T Racer Build Journal enough, then it is kind of like welding, get a puddle started get the tip parallel with the joint and slowly work your way down. Don't hold the iron on the joint all the time; lift it off puddle some solder on the iron add add to joint. Keep in mind that when you touch the iron to the brass it sucks the heat out of the iron. Lift the iron off and it will reheat. Also use the liquid flux that comes with the Staybrite. It tends to boil and helps with the heat. Another thing keep a wet sponge in a dish and occasionaly wipe the iron tip to clean it. Slag build up will also hinder heat transfer.

    If you are serious about long term soldering visit a local plumbing Article: 1/8th Scale Model T Racer Build Journal supply shop and order the Staybrite flux in a 16oz. container and get a 1lb. roll of solder either 1/32" or 1/16th" diameter. I use both




    Article: 1/8th Scale Model T Racer Build Journal
    Last edited by xken; 02-20-09 at 08:53 PM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #34

  4. ScaleMotorcars's Avatar Administrator
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    Quote Originally Posted by xken View Post
    get the tip parallel with the joint and slowly work your way down.

    I'm more then accustomed to gas welding so I follow you just fine on that but I would like to ask you a little more about the tip and angle. Are you using a fine tip or wide tip? Straight edge or angled and when you say keep the tip parallel are you referring to keeping the largest area of the tip flush with the work or the fine edge running down the work?
    QUOTE QUOTE #35

  5. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Pictures are worth a thousand words. This is the iron I use most of the time, used earlier today to make the brackets. It is a big mother, and does take time to heat up to temp; but once there works great.



    Here is how to hold and travel down joint. I just stagged this rather than try to explain in words. This is a chisel tip and I tend to favor the side rather than the flat for close work.



    Just started the rear leaf spring here is a shot of the first leaf.




    Article: 1/8th Scale Model T Racer Build Journal
    Last edited by ScaleMotorcars; 08-30-11 at 11:54 AM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #36

  6. ScaleMotorcars's Avatar Administrator
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    Daniel
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    Thanks Ken, that answers my question perfectly.

    Ive had one of those monsters for over 15 years and never plugged it in until today. Ive always tried to do the soldering with a Weller pistol grip or jewelers torch without much luck I must add.
    It needs the new cord but 150 watt Craftsman should do the job.
    Attached Images Attached Images Article: 1/8th Scale Model T Racer Build Journal-craftsman-gif 
    Last edited by ScaleMotorcars; 02-21-09 at 09:00 AM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #37

  7. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    I've got 3 types of soldering irons. One is like you have, Ken but is smaller. The other is my torch that has an attachment that goes over the flame. I do both flame soldering and iron soldering. The third is a pen shaped torch by Weller that can be used in small spaces either with the flame or the attachment. Maybe one thing I ought to do is a burn care tutorial. I'm very experienced with treating burns.
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #38

  8. Don Garrett's Avatar Asst. Administrator
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    Got one of these Jeff? Rick needs one, he just doesn't know it yet.
    Attached Images Attached Images Article: 1/8th Scale Model T Racer Build Journal-001-jpg 
    Grandpa McGurk.....Steppin' Large and Livin' easy.
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    QUOTE QUOTE #39

  9. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Is that a plastic welder tip? Do I need one of those too? Where did you get that? Inquiring minds want to know.
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #40

  10. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Get that big boy re-wired and get cooking that should easliy do the job.

    Hot Article: 1/8th Scale Model T Racer Build Journal Ford Coupe, you need to get a "big iron", I use flame now and then on real big solid things like multi layer engine block bildups like I did on my Mercedes engine. As for the burn tutorial I will leave that one up to you, I personally avoid burning myself as much as possible. One of the reasons I use binding wire.



    Article: 1/8th Scale Model T Racer Build Journal
    QUOTE QUOTE #41

  11. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    I have a lot of experience treating burns. My own. I'm not clutzy and burns are infrequent but I hate 'em when I get 'em.

    I find flame soldering is a bit limited because of the potential of remelting previous joints.
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #42

  12. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    You hit the nail right on the head. I learned that the hard way myself when I first started. Flame is best left to assemblies clamped or bound together with nothing little attached. There is 1,2,3,4, silver solder that my wife uses in her work. Each number is a different melt range for specifically these kind of operations, but requires torches and great skill and patience. For now I won't even go there. By the way she taught silversmithing at the Cleveland Institute of Art for 10 years where she graduated from and owns more tools than I do.



    Article: 1/8th Scale Model T Racer Build Journal
    QUOTE QUOTE #43

  13. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    The rear leaf springs are hand formed using 1/32" x 1/4" brass strip. The first lower leaf is the foundation and most important to get correct, for it will be used to fit all subsequent ones to. The ends are cold formed around a 3/32" drill bit shank as a mandrell. Sneak up on the forming and fit this has to be symetrical left to right and up and down.



    How the leaves are formed and mated.



    Here are all the form fitted leaves together. Note I used a 3/32" drill bit not 5/32" as noted in picture.



    Rear view of spring fitted to chassis. Binding wire holds them until the shackles are made.



    Rear left 3/4 view, ends of leaves still need to be tapered and trimmed.



    The same process will be used to form the front spring next.



    Here is the front spring bolted in place. It was much easier and quicker than the rear.



    Overall view of chassis so far.




    Article: 1/8th Scale Model T Racer Build Journal
    Last edited by ScaleMotorcars; 08-30-11 at 11:59 AM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #44

  14. Rick's Avatar Member
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    Man, this is great stuff. Thanks so much!

    Here's a challenge for you. How about scratchbuilding a street rod chassis next........
    QUOTE QUOTE #45

  15. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Kenneth
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    Do you have plans with demensions of one that you have in mind? Is it a box or tubular frame? The one I am building is the original "C" frame. Many of the principles are the same.




    Article: 1/8th Scale Model T Racer Build Journal
    QUOTE QUOTE #46

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