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    1. Kit: , by (VIP/Sponsor) xken is offline
      Builder Last Online: Jun 2019 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/8 Rating:  (24 votes - 4.71 average) Thanks: 0
      Started: 02-15-09 Build Revisions: Never  
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      This build will be intended to aquaint those interested in working with brass. I will also keep it simple so as no sophisticated equipment is required. Everything will be hand built with hand tools. So of course if you have equipment you can build quicker. This will be a 1/8th scale Model T racer when completed. I have a picture posted in another thread. And I will find tune as I post.

      Here is getting started by cutting out the profile of the side rails. You need real good light to cut down the scribe line. Once cut out the side rail may have some curl from cutting, very carefully with just your fingers form it back to flat slowly and carefully. The rails were layed out on 1" x 12" x.016" brass sheet. The angles were 3/16" x 36" x.016". When all soldered together the side walls will be 1/32" thick with the return flanges being .016. Working with brass is like playing chess; you have to plan ahead right down to buying your materials. Build the part in you head first step by step, then buy what you need, materials, tools etc.



      Here is soldering the side rails to top angles. The secret to soldering is letting your iron get real hot Article: 1/8th Scale Model T Racer Build Journal , touch it to the solder end to gather a puddle on the iron and then to the joint. Remember solder will always flow to heat and since it is liquid is subject to the laws of gravity.
      I apply the liquid flux with a paint brush to the entire joint before soldering. The tempurature is correct when the solder flows freely into the joint. The spring clamps also provide handles to hold the piece while soldering.



      Here is a closeup of the above picture.



      Here is a shot of adding the rail extension since stock sheet was too short. Needed another 11/16". Once finished up the joint is barely visible and I put this to the rear of the chassis where it will be less obvious anyway.



      Here is how to file the bottom angle to fit the side rail. Double sided carpet tape works great to hold small pieces. I would recommend buying a steel block if you do not have one. I think MicroMark offers one. Also handy to hammer some parts back to flat. Be careful to slowly remove the part from the tape so as not to bend or distort the piece. The tape adhesive works well in holding it in place.



      Here is the bottom angle cut and filed to fit. Working with brass requires patience and a good assortment of files.



      Here is how to remove excess solder. Scrape Article: 1/8th Scale Model T Racer Build Journal , file, sand Article: 1/8th Scale Model T Racer Build Journal and polish. Note: Blades are stamped out as a result one edge is rounded down while the other has a sharp edge. Use the sharp edge to scrape Article: 1/8th Scale Model T Racer Build Journal . You can easilly tell the difference when you try to scrape Article: 1/8th Scale Model T Racer Build Journal .



      Here is the finished left rail.



      Now to finish up the right side. Then the next installment will be the crossmenbers.
      Please feel free to post questions, and there is no such thing as a stupid question.

      Ken


      Article: 1/8th Scale Model T Racer Build Journal

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      Article: 1/8th Scale Model T Racer Build Journal-modelt-gif 


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  1. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Kenneth
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    Now it makes sense about the differences. Thanks for the insights. My build intent is to replicate the car in the Glenmoor pictures since I have those pictures and to share some "How To Information" on working with brass to others here.

    I would appreciate any and all help with drawings photos and such since I would like to build it as accurate as possible. If I owned a T or had access to one I would be taking all kinds of closeup pictures of details to build from. Sounds like the Hawk motor would be the right one for this chassis since it is a 1927 engine. I guess what through me off was the plaque description saying it was a 1911 car, and from what I am learning the clincher wheels came later.

    I did order a Model T parts catalog but am still waiting for it to arrive.

    By the way didn't I see you at the last supper, I was the guy with the black beard!

    Ken


    Article: 1/8th Scale Model T Racer Build Journal
    QUOTE QUOTE #17

  2. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Kenneth
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    Is this the same engine that is in your pictures? I found this in my 1918 Dyke's manual.





    Article: 1/8th Scale Model T Racer Build Journal
    Last edited by ScaleMotorcars; 08-30-11 at 11:43 AM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #18

  3. Don Garrett's Avatar Asst. Administrator
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    Don
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    Pretty close.
    Grandpa McGurk.....Steppin' Large and Livin' easy.
    TDRinnovations.com
    QUOTE QUOTE #19

  4. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Kenneth
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    Here I have enlarged a plan view of the engine to 1/8th scale and printed it on card stock. I use card stock to make many patterns because it has enough stiffness to trace around with a scribe and be used for test fitting.



    Here is a great example of the use of binding wire before soldering. Binding wire is like all those fingers you wish you had and did not want to get burned. Note how tight you can get the joints to fit which is the key to good soldering.




    Here I am using wood to hold the small piece of brass in place until soldered.



    Here is the finished for now front engine mount. What is nice about working with brass is that I can CA the part in place and if need to be worked on, modified or move it is easily debonded with no damage to it. Once complete then it will be soldered in place. Scratch building is a great deal of detective work at times; no instructions and you make your own parts, some times more than once.




    Article: 1/8th Scale Model T Racer Build Journal
    Last edited by ScaleMotorcars; 08-30-11 at 11:47 AM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #20

  5. Don Garrett's Avatar Asst. Administrator
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    Don
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    Ken, I gotta tell ya.....it doesn't get any better than this. Superb,
    Grandpa McGurk.....Steppin' Large and Livin' easy.
    TDRinnovations.com
    QUOTE QUOTE #21

  6. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Kenneth
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    Thanks, are those the 12 guys that were at the last supper?

    Ken


    Article: 1/8th Scale Model T Racer Build Journal
    QUOTE QUOTE #22

  7. Tage's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Daniel
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    Beautiful work,
    Outstanding tutorial. THANK YOU!



    By the way...
    I saw you at the Last Supper, I had the fish.
    QUOTE QUOTE #23

  8. ScaleMotorcars's Avatar Administrator
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    Daniel
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    I'm back... Lost my Internet connection yesterday. Might have something to do with completely gutting my office to find the desk.

    Ken, have you ever considered doing a video tutorial?

    Nothing major just a quick vid on how you run the solder joints. Ive tried and tried but they never look anything like yours. Especially running a long joint like you did on the frame rail.
    QUOTE QUOTE #24

  9. hot ford coupe's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Jeffrey
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tage View Post
    Beautiful work,
    Outstanding tutorial. THANK YOU!



    By the way...
    I saw you at the Last Supper, I had the fish.
    Hey, did you guys at the last supper remember seeing my Uncle Mordechai? He was the one serving the fruit cocktails at the beginning in the light blue toga. He used to work for Jerry's Jerusalem Caterers until the Romans shut the place down.
    Sometimes a handful of patience is worth more than a truck load of brains. Have the courage to trust your own beliefs. Don't be swayed by those with louder voices. W.S. Maugham :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #25

  10. MADD FABRICATOR's Avatar Established Member
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    Richard D. Zimmerman
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    xken, some very beautiful work. Looks like you've got this soldering process well in hand.
    Love your work.
    CHEERZZZZ !!!!!!! (MF)
    NEVER argue with an IDIOT, for he'll only drag you down to his level and beat you with experience !!!!
    QUOTE QUOTE #26

  11. xken's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Kenneth
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    Here are the steps to make the chassis brackets that contain the ends of the tensioning rod to stiffen and strengthen the chassis. Kind of like a bridge structure.



    Here is the soldering operation. Again working with brass is like a chess game thinking ahead helps. For example pre-drilling holes and adding excess material in straps that is cut off after soldering. Also learn to enjoy the smell of burning wood. After completeting one I cut the burnt end off to have a clean end to press fit on next piece.



    Here is a closeup of the finished bracket with rivets soldered to the frame. The tension rod is threaded and function like the original.



    Here is the basic chassis with the brackets and tension rods in place.




    Article: 1/8th Scale Model T Racer Build Journal
    Last edited by ScaleMotorcars; 08-30-11 at 11:52 AM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #27

  12. ScaleMotorcars's Avatar Administrator
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    Daniel
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    So Ken have you settled on exactly what version you'll finish with? Will it be the Golden T,( My favorite) or a derivative of another Model T racer?
    QUOTE QUOTE #28

  13. Don Garrett's Avatar Asst. Administrator
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    I don't want to know, I'm content watching it unfold post by post.
    Grandpa McGurk.....Steppin' Large and Livin' easy.
    TDRinnovations.com
    QUOTE QUOTE #29

  14. ScaleMotorcars's Avatar Administrator
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    Daniel
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    Found some great photos of the interior.
    Attached Images Attached Images Article: 1/8th Scale Model T Racer Build Journal-2668286690_ccc98d7cfd_b-jpg  Article: 1/8th Scale Model T Racer Build Journal-2667461375_8bb8658ce1_b-jpg 
    QUOTE QUOTE #30

  15. ScaleMotorcars's Avatar Administrator
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    Daniel
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    Found a little tidbit of trivia for you. This Golden T was build by "George & Jobling" airplane builders of the early 1900's. Now your plane buddies cant rib ya about building a car.

    Same car at the 2008 Goodwood festival.
    Attached Images Attached Images Article: 1/8th Scale Model T Racer Build Journal-2677870856_7082bba090_b-jpg 
    Last edited by ScaleMotorcars; 02-20-09 at 06:27 PM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #31

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