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    1. Kit: , by (Yearly Subscriber) MODEL A MODEL is offline
      Builder Last Online: Jun 2020 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/4 Rating:  (1 votes - 5.00 average) Thanks: 1
      Started: 03-28-20 Build Revisions: Never  
      Supported Attribution Scratch Built

      Bugatt Type 35 , 1/4th Scale-bugatti-type-35-2-3-jpg


      Bugatt Type 35 , 1/4th Scale
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  1. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    You are right Roger!

    I include, under the category of "Details", proper thickness of edges, gaps between surfaces, and the even or in some cases un-even condition of those gaps, and bolt heads! Too many people will buy 0-80 Bugatt Type 35 , 1/4th Scale Hex Head screws, and use them right out of the packet, oblivious of how thick the heads are? Welds? reduce welds down to some scales and they disappear, but in larger scales there is an opportunity to create details that actually show some of the character of the processes used in making these cars that we love.

    With stamped components, I try my best to replicate all the radius in the part. Surface quality is another issue that is definitely easier to deal with in larger scales. Material choices especially considering wood grain, or leather, or cloth, these are all easier in larger scales. Wood grain should be as fine and tight as possible. Oak, most Mahogany, and a few other woods are just too coarse to use on models. Leather is very difficult to replicate, unless it is a highly processed example. And cloth? even using a very fine thread count, it just does not want to lay down as it should.


    Bugatt Type 35 , 1/4th Scale
    Last edited by MODEL A MODEL; 04-15-20 at 06:42 PM.
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #17

  2. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    Spent part of today cutting Brass and fine tuning the fit, Not visible are the front and rear of this soon to be radiator, but their there! And its too late for me to be banging around in my garage, plus I think I'll dig out my jewelers kiln, to better anneal the Brass.




    Bugatt Type 35 , 1/4th Scale
    Last edited by MODEL A MODEL; 04-04-20 at 02:32 AM.
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #18

  3. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    I was also very fortunate trawling online today. The following picture is pretty much exactly what I intend to create!

    It is obviously of a modern recreation of a Type 35 radiator! Being dry fit prior to soldering and assembly!

    Lucky me!




    The above image was found at BLAAK Radiateuren, of Belgium


    Bugatt Type 35 , 1/4th Scale
    Last edited by MODEL A MODEL; 04-04-20 at 10:05 PM.
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #19

  4. Bugatti Fan's Avatar Established Member
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    Noel
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    The Unimats are fine machines as is the Sherline range.
    Did you know that Sherline had their beginnings in Australia? I got their catalogue from a UK agent some years ago now but not sure if they are still imported.
    There are a number of small model making lathes that have been available down the years Toyo, Peatol, Proxxon to name but a few. The Proxxon machine looks good and this German company makes a really good range of model making machine tools. Well worth a look on their website.
    More recently a number of general tool supply companies have been importing small lathes and milling machines from China.
    The Rolls Royce of model making lathes has to be the Cowells machine. Beautifully crafted but pricey as you would expect.

    A quarter full size type 35 Bugatti model. Wow that will be huge, twice the scale size of a Pocher.
    QUOTE QUOTE #20

  5. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    Hello Noel!

    Your right about the Cowells, I saw one many years ago and was impressed. -I did know of Sherline's origin. Have you ever visited the online museum, they have founded? The Craftsmanship Museum?

    www.craftsmanshipmuseum.com

    I think you will be very pleasantly surprised.

    I have owned a few lathes, actually a few of everything, bandsaws, compressors, a dozen or so Dremel Bugatt Type 35 , 1/4th Scale tools, - I collect old airbrushes, . . .

    I have settled on a long bed Sherline lathe, I have an old watchmakers lathe but never use it. -And I have a long bed Myford Super 7. This was a indulgence of mine, made possible with a very small inheritance. I have also owned a few small mills, but now use a "Frankensteins' Monster" that I have spliced together. From the knee down, including the base, it is a DURO, made here in Los Angeles, back in 1942. (I know this because the next year they changed their name to BENCHMASTER, and changed the pattern that they were cast from) I added an extension to the column for more day-light under the head, and at first I put a UNIMAT 5 mill head on it, but last year replaced that with a Sherline. I have 9 different ranges of movement, positive and negative Z, and its pretty stable.

    1/4th scale does seem huge at first, and definitely when set down next to most other models, it does dwarf them, but really, its my hands, -they aren't as nimble as they used to be, and I enjoy the effort, the heft? and the opportunity to make some details that before, were either suggested, or ignored.


    Of course, with the increase in size not much can be hidden, and from the critical, less is forgiven. Its all there, warts and all.


    Bugatt Type 35 , 1/4th Scale
    Last edited by MODEL A MODEL; 04-15-20 at 11:05 AM.
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #21

  6. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    It looks like a solid block of Brass, but it is not. Again I've been overly anxious to work on something, anything!, -that I am not planning so much as doing?

    I sort of had an idea what I wanted to do but well? it wasn't actually drawn out and . . . truth is I just grabbed some plates of Brass, with a vague idea, and well? -this is where I'm at!





    What your seeing are four plates of Brass that will fit into the shell. My thinking is to bulk out the areas that would be hollow, and use that to assure proper shape to the shell, and aide in assembly. There will of course be the Aluminum Honey-comb, and I think I'll turn the cap out of Nickel-Silver?

    Hose attachments will be kept loose till I can confirm their placement with relation to the engine.


    Bugatt Type 35 , 1/4th Scale
    Last edited by MODEL A MODEL; 04-12-20 at 03:13 PM.
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #22

  7. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    A few more images of actual Bugatti radiators, -the "see-thru" picture has been in my mind since I first saw it years ago. - And recreating that image is one of my driving goals.








    Bugatt Type 35 , 1/4th Scale
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #23

  8. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    More references for a model radiator. (non-functioning)









    Bugatt Type 35 , 1/4th Scale
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #24

  9. Jo NZ's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Jo
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    I can see the honeycomb, but where does the water go?
    QUOTE QUOTE #25

  10. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    Hay Jo, hope you and yours are ok down there!

    Look at the cores that are laying down on that bench, see the flat area? and then look closely at the radiator still in its original wrapper? (car) -at the top you'll see a shadowy area, (of dirt I assume). This is a "false" Honeycomb area. The upper reservoir, and its not too clear, yet, but the sides are also hollow and carry much of the water there.

    -This will be clearer when I finish my next step. The Brass plates that I have started with, get the Honeycomb area cut out, and then screwed or soldered together. (Thinking of taking the cut out "scrap" and melting it to cast a copy or two of the finished "pattern"

    I could have saved myself a lot of time if I had just made a Renshape pattern and gone straight to casting Bugatt Type 35 , 1/4th Scale these things! But we're all distracted right now. And laboring is therapeutic.

    I'm fine by the way, how are you?


    -Don


    Bugatt Type 35 , 1/4th Scale
    Last edited by MODEL A MODEL; 04-19-20 at 08:46 AM.
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #26

  11. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    I tried to make 1/4th scale copies of these tubes, Thought to use Hex Keys as formers, pressing in captured precut bits, but that looked to be too much trouble. So I bought a Hexagonal Draw Plate to try to form Hexagonal tubes from round stock, but the round tube stock work hardened too quickly. Specially made crimper pliers would probably work, but I haven't tried that yet.

    Fortunately I did find a source for Aluminum Honey-Comb, that is close enough to what I want, so for now, that is how I'm going to proceed.




    Bugatt Type 35 , 1/4th Scale
    Last edited by MODEL A MODEL; 04-17-20 at 02:38 PM.
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #27

  12. happyfreddy's Avatar Established Member
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    freddy
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    I think in originally only at the hexagonal sides the cooler is soldered and that at both ends.
    So the water can flow between the tubes cause there is enough space
    QUOTE QUOTE #28

  13. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    Hello Freddy! Yes I think you are right! There are many ways that radiators were made, many variations, many patterns.


    Bugatt Type 35 , 1/4th Scale
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #29

  14. Jo NZ's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Jo
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    Quote Originally Posted by MODEL A MODEL View Post
    I tried to make 1/4th scale copies of these tubes, Thought to use Hex Keys as formers, pressing in captured precut bits, but that looked to be too much trouble. So I bought a Hexagonal Draw Plate to try to form Hexagonal tubes from round stock, but the round tube stock work hardened too quickly. Specially made crimper pliers would probably work, but I haven't tried that yet.

    Fortunately I did find a source for Honey-comb Aluminum, that is close enough to what I want, so for now, that is how I'm going to proceed.

    Yes I see now! The circular tube with hexagonal ends makes perfect sense. Are you trying to draw brass or copper? Copper anneals much softer than brass. And excuse me if this is egg-sucking, but did you lubricate the tube and drawplate?

    How are we down here? absolutely fine, but I'm starting to need modelling supplies that I could get locally if the shops weren't shut. Glue and lathe bearings will be the first things to buy... (did you know that a Unimat 3 uses skateboard bearings?)
    QUOTE QUOTE #30

  15. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    Hi Jo,

    Do you have experience drawing tubes? What lubricant is best? -it's ok to tell me Paraffin, I know you mean Kerosene.

    Well? -some skateboarders present more of a load, than those lathes were ever expected to handle.

    You need glue and bearings, Roger is running out of gas, and I don't have any of my favorite sandpaper left. (using the bad stuff now)

    Tomorrow I have to see about getting a new bandsaw blade.


    Bugatt Type 35 , 1/4th Scale
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #31

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