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    1. Kit: , by (Yearly Subscriber) Jo NZ is offline
      Builder Last Online: Aug 2022 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/8 Rating:  Thanks: 1
      Started: 12-25-19 Build Revisions: Never  
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      Bloody Mary is a hillclimber, built in the UK by John and Richard Bolster in 1929, when they were both schoolboys. It has a wooden (ash) chassis and was originally powered by a single JAP V-twin of 750cc. Through the years, pre-war, it was refitted with bigger engines and ended up with two 1000cc JAP KTOR V-twins, mounted in tandem. It competed until 1959, when it was put on display at the Montagu Motor Museum - and it's still there. It appears these days at events like Goodwood - the picture below is a from recent visit.

      Bloody Mary in 1/8 scale scratch build-bm1-jpg


      Bloody Mary in 1/8 scale scratch build
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  1. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    Wow! (I assume that's sort of what you expect to hear) (It's what I like to hear.) So. WOW! Pretty nice!

    It took me a second and third look to see your error. Would never have noticed it. And as for gaps, that's what gaskets are for!

    Very nice work so far! Someday I'll have to try FUSION 360!
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #47

  2. Jo NZ's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Jo
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    Quote Originally Posted by MODEL A MODEL View Post
    Someday I'll have to try FUSION 360!
    I struggled with several online tutorials until I found this guy (and I've used CAD before) as long as you remember that it's is 2D derived it's easy... https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCR-...k6u4gwqacqx-WQ - Arnold Rowntree
    And - Fusion is free to hobbyists.


    Bloody Mary in 1/8 scale scratch build
    QUOTE QUOTE #48

  3. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    Thanks for the suggestion! My "day job" has me super busy! -but when I get some down time, I'll invest some and learn something new!
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #49

  4. Jo NZ's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Jo
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    Now I have the engines and carbs printed, it's time to start on fitting the engines into the chassis.
    The engines have plates bolted to each side to allow for fixing, like this...

    Bloody Mary in 1/8 scale scratch build-screenshot-2022-05-11-214907-jpg

    Except, of course, for the rear right hand mount which supports the handbrake and gear-change cross shafts and is like this��

    Bloody Mary in 1/8 scale scratch build-screenshot-2022-05-11-214700-jpg

    The engines have a variety of supports. The rear of the rear engine is supported on hangars to the top of the chassis, and in my ignorance I supposed that all the supports were like that... no chance! There's an angle across the chassis between the engines that the front engine hangs off. Added to that the front of the rear engine hangs off the front engine by a couple of steel straps. The front engine is offset from the rear, presumably to align the chain. With me so far? more pics...

    Bloody Mary in 1/8 scale scratch build-img_3722-jpg

    Bloody Mary in 1/8 scale scratch build-img_3724-jpg

    Making the carbs was important to align the front engine as the inlet protrudes through the bodywork, so it needs to be outside the chassis.

    Bloody Mary in 1/8 scale scratch build-img_3726-jpg

    Bolster had a problem with keeping the engines in sync, and originally used a jockey wheel to keep the chain taut between the two motors. A friend of his came up with an ingenious way of adjusting the front engine to keep the chain tight without the power sapping jockey wheel. There are no details... From the photos I have, I think it works like this.

    Bloody Mary in 1/8 scale scratch build-img_3721-jpg

    There are two adjustable rods from the front engine to the front chassis rail. When these are tightened up, the front engine pivots on it's rear mount and tightens the chain, as the sprocket moves forward.




    The chain. I found that the easiest way to join a short chain was to cut down a spare jig (you get heaps) otherwise the chain has a mind of it's own

    Bloody Mary in 1/8 scale scratch build-img_3717-jpg

    I think that the chain is about right in pitch, but it's way too wide. I'm happy to live with that, when the body is on it will be difficult to see.



    A couple more views from underneath

    Bloody Mary in 1/8 scale scratch build-img_3728-jpg

    Bloody Mary in 1/8 scale scratch build-img_3729-jpg

    Next will be to sort out the gearbox mount and rear axle swing arm. Another voyage of discovery....


    Bloody Mary in 1/8 scale scratch build
    Attached Images Attached Images Bloody Mary in 1/8 scale scratch build-img_3681-jpg 
    Last edited by Jo NZ; 05-12-22 at 03:25 AM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #50

  5. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Interesting construction! It seems you have a lot to guess...
    QUOTE QUOTE #51

  6. Jo NZ's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Guessing? yes Roger, but I prefer "estimating"

    Some more estimating follows...

    I have very few pictures of the gearbox bracket as it's well hidden. Here's the best view...

    Bloody Mary in 1/8 scale scratch build-img_0329-jpg

    The bracket is the black bit in the middle of the picture. Supported by 1'' by 1/4" steel bar, as is everything else!


    I positioned the gearbox at what I hope is the correct position (measuring from photos) in Fusion360. This is how I interpreted the bracket

    Bloody Mary in 1/8 scale scratch build-screenshot-2022-06-01-132617-jpg

    Bloody Mary in 1/8 scale scratch build-screenshot-2022-06-01-133036-jpg

    For trial purposes I've printed the bracket and gearbox as one piece - for the final version I'll print them separately to make painting easier.

    The spring and suspension arm mount to the back axle looks like this...

    Bloody Mary in 1/8 scale scratch build-img_0325-jpg

    I drew it up to match the width of my rear spring, which is the same width as the chassis.

    Bloody Mary in 1/8 scale scratch build-screenshot-2022-06-01-132725-jpg


    It's obviously too wide. I'm wondering if the spring tongue that slots into the bracket has been narrowed. Something to try next...

    I also had a go at the steering wheel

    Bloody Mary in 1/8 scale scratch build-screenshot-2022-06-01-132814-jpg

    It needs some more work in terms of detail. More importantly, it won't print. I had drawn the spokes at 4mm thick (which seemed reasonable) but printed in 1/8 scale they are only 0.5mm thick, and can't support the rim. I'll try double the thickness....


    Bloody Mary in 1/8 scale scratch build
    Attached Images Attached Images Bloody Mary in 1/8 scale scratch build-img_0330-jpg 
    Last edited by Jo NZ; 06-02-22 at 12:02 AM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #52

  7. Jo NZ's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    The revised axle clamp. The tongue on the spring will need to be 3mm (from a 5mm spring width). These are handed, but Chitubox will produce a mirror image so I can print them in pairs.

    Bloody Mary in 1/8 scale scratch build-screenshot-2022-06-03-130737-jpg


    Bloody Mary in 1/8 scale scratch build
    QUOTE QUOTE #53

  8. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    This may be the most complex model (Going to be), that I have ever seen!

    Cars like this aren't assembly line, and are evolving with each race, for years! An engine is chosen, a frame is made and then all the modifications! So many disparate parts. Like cleaning out all your spare parts bins, and those of four other fellows' as well!

    For you, it will never be a straightforward linear progression of work. -I'm sure your making notes.

    Good luck!
    Last edited by MODEL A MODEL; 06-04-22 at 01:08 PM.
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #54

  9. Jo NZ's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Thanks, Don. In my ignorance I thought that, as it was a homebuilt, it would be simple.....


    Bloody Mary in 1/8 scale scratch build
    QUOTE QUOTE #55

  10. Jo NZ's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    A milestone! Only a year on from when I started to create the sprockets, they are all fitted. Three chains!

    Along the way, of course, I had to make the gearbox, gearbox bracket and axle clamps/spring mounts (and the springs) but that doesn't matter because it all fits, the axle sprocket just misses the rear chassis rail (as it should) and the axle fits snugly behind the back of the seat back. Whoopee!

    Bloody Mary in 1/8 scale scratch build-img_3735-jpg

    Bloody Mary in 1/8 scale scratch build-img_3739-jpg

    And here is the gearbox support...

    Bloody Mary in 1/8 scale scratch build-img_3741-jpg


    Bloody Mary in 1/8 scale scratch build
    QUOTE QUOTE #56

  11. JunkGTZ's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Larry
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    This build is impressive, but I am also impressed that any human being would be crazy enough to drive the real think in anger with all those moving arts so close to the driver. It looks like driving a car with a running chainsaw in the passenger seat and it's not buckled in! Nonetheless, that's really amazing you got it all to fit perfectly. With that many pieces to it, I can imagine you probably expected some fitment adjustments might be necessary.
    QUOTE QUOTE #57

  12. Jo NZ's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Fitment adjustments are entirely necessary. Even if I'm going to make it in metal, designing and printing it in 3d makes life a bit easier (as long as you draw the 3d model to be adjustable)

    I started looking at the rest of the rear suspension, and began with the Hartford tension spring/spider. It's the same size damper as the front ones, which I'd estimated at 5" - thinking that Hartford dampers only came in 5 or 6 inch diameters. Further research showed that I was wrong - 2 1/2 ", 3" and 4" were also available. I'd put aside the front suspension because I couldn't get it to fit. Now with a 4" damper I redrew it. Here are the damper supports, damper arm, spider and the Armstrong hydraulic damper in place...

    Bloody Mary in 1/8 scale scratch build-img_0394-jpg

    Here is the 3d design - note that I made the side plates thicker so they wouldn't warp when printed

    Bloody Mary in 1/8 scale scratch build-screenshot-2022-06-30-203638-jpg

    Bloody Mary in 1/8 scale scratch build-screenshot-2022-06-30-203833-jpg

    Bloody Mary in 1/8 scale scratch build-screenshot-2022-07-03-144034-jpg

    I used the printed sideplates as templates. I used double sided tape to fix them to brass sheet (the right thickness) and cut them out.

    I also printed the brake shaft support (I've no Idea where it's from, but it's obviously from another car - just not an Austin 7) which is sandwiched between the outer support plate and the chassis bracket.



    Here are the components

    Bloody Mary in 1/8 scale scratch build-img_3746-jpg

    And the first attempt at assembly. Some refining of the damper arm is needed....

    Bloody Mary in 1/8 scale scratch build-img_3749-jpg


    Bloody Mary in 1/8 scale scratch build
    QUOTE QUOTE #58

  13. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Hello Jo,

    Way back, when Roger first introduced us to his Continental project, he called it "Madness" -well?

    He is looking pretty sane, now.

    The "Madman is dead, long live the madman!" or for Roger, - "Le roi est mort, vive le roi!"
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #59

  14. Jo NZ's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Thanks Don, but I think that the French should be "le fou est mort, vive le fou!"

    Due respect to Roger


    Bloody Mary in 1/8 scale scratch build
    QUOTE QUOTE #60

  15. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    excusez-moi

    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #61

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