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    1. Kit: , by (Yearly Subscriber) Roger Zimmermann is offline
      Builder Last Online: Apr 2020 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/12 Rating:  (2 votes - 5.00 average) Thanks: 2
      Started: 07-26-19 Build Revisions: Never  
      Supported Scratch Built

      Before the Mark II was finished, I was thinking that I need some rest and maybe stopping modeling completely.
      After a few months "without", I noticed that I'm missing something. But, what to do? A new 10-years project is out of question, I need something less complex.
      After a while, it was clear that I had to do something with Cadillac. But what? The answer came rather quickly: a 1930 to 1933 Cadillac V-16 engine and frame, as a rolling frame.
      I have some contacts with people restoring the second version: 1932/33 which differs framewise from the first version 1930/31.
      I will have to do new things, like wire wheels! I searched in this forum for a tutorial, but found nothing. However , I do remember that somebody did recently (1 to 2 years) wire wheels. Can somebody tell me where to search?


      1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
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  1. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Quote Originally Posted by Egon View Post
    There are a progam in google to translate your language to english.
    Egon, I hate machines which are trying to translate. It's usually a garbage!


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #107

  2. Egon's Avatar Moderator
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    I think they are okay in google most of the time, you can test it with a sentences and translate it both ways. The german is not always good, but it's a good way to learn the language, I did and just getting better and better. I do use google some times in english spelling.
    QUOTE QUOTE #108

  3. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    On my other models, I did the brake shoes by turning a piece of brass. As only the emergency brake would be functional, I did only the rear brake shoes. On this model, I came to the conclusion that the same approach would create a lot of waste. I decided the make the shoes with flat brass. The picture is showing the parts which will eventually be shaped as brake shoes. The eight half circular parts were initially straight; to cut them with the correct shape from a brass sheet would also create a lot of waste. It took somewhat more time to shape them; time is free!
    Now, I will have to shape them according to the original set-up and soft solder the sole (if that word is correct in English).



    The brake system will not be a genuine replica of the original one; I have to take liberties and I'm simplifying the system. For example, the floating shoes were made with aluminum because its dilatation was greater than a shoe made with steel, therefore avoiding or retarding the fading of the brakes. I have some doubts that this theory was really effective; the fact is that later brake shoes were all made with steel.


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #109

  4. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Adding functionality to a scale model means that the time spent to make all the parts is increasing dramatically! As I still hope that I can have a model with a functioning service brake means that all details must play together.
    After soldering the brake shoes and trimming them, I began to "install" the anchored front shoes (one per side). I did first a large flat support onto the shoe will be anchored. The other side of the shoe is in contact with the cam. By turning that cam, the drum should be stopped. First, I trimmed the free end of the shoe until the drum could be turn more or less freely. Then, I silver soldered the cam on the shaft I showed some time ago. Then, the test: yes, the drum can be stopped with a rather mall movement of the external lever (the one on which the cable will be attached).



    The next task will be to trim that flat plate and prepare and fabricate what's needing for the floating shoe.

    As the rear brake shields are different, the rear brakes will be done later, probably when the rear axle will be available to position the shields correctly.


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #110

  5. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Even if I'm simplify the brake system a bit, I was faced with a specific problem like "how to avoid that the axles are dislodged?" By soft soldering a washer at the end of the shaft can be a solution (with the risk that the next part is soldered too), but how to do in case something unexpected is happening and the shaft must be removed? Finally, the solution used on the real car is the best I found and I will follow this idea. The next problem was: how to cut a groove 0.3mm wide? By thinking a bit "out of the box", I used a cutting mill, attached it firmly and approached it to the axle. By turning gently, I could do a groove deep enough to inset a similar part like the original.



    The next picture is from the original system; the axles are for the link on the right side; the arresting plates are attached with one screw each. This is what I will reproduce.




    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #111

  6. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    According to a guy in England, my explanation about what I intended to do was confusing. I'm not surprised because sometimes to describe clearly a small story in a foreign language can be hard to understand. Therefore, I'm showing in pictures what I'm doing. First, the parts, especially the axle with the groove and the plate which will be engaged into the grove. Then the assembly, which took about 10 minutes to achieve because the small plate had no envy to stay in place.
    A similar plate will be installed at the other end of the link.






    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #112

  7. markus68's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Are you counting all the parts?
    QUOTE QUOTE #113

  8. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    In fact, no! However, because of your question, I will count the number of separate pieces when the first brake assembly is done. I will try to take in account the various tiny pieces which are either silver or soft soldered. For example, the lever which will be actuated by the cable is an assembly of 5 elements.
    Thanks for asking!


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #114

  9. markus68's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Thanks for answering.
    QUOTE QUOTE #115

  10. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Finally the first front brake is ready. From Markus, I had the question about the number of parts needed. Here is the detail from all was needed to complete that LH front brake; parts which were soft or silver soldered are included because they had to be cut, adjusted and soldered:

    Brake shield: 18
    Knuckle: 5
    Actuating levers: 18
    Brake shoes: 28
    Fasteners, various: 15
    Total: 84

    The 4 cotter pins which will be added during the final assembly are not included.





    The good news is that the brake is functioning well, with a minimal travel from the upper lever. I cannot say if both shoes are applied with the same strength to the drum!
    Now, I can complete the RH front brake system.


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #116

  11. happyfreddy's Avatar Established Member
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    Nice work Roger !!!

    Counting the parts is easy ........
    Be glad that there was no question if all the parts are signed with the original part number
    QUOTE QUOTE #117

  12. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Thanks Freddy! No, I will not issue a Marter Parts List!


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #118

  13. markus68's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    functional parts are always cool.
    QUOTE QUOTE #119

  14. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Now, both front brake assemblies are ready; the other one went quicker to finish as I had something to look at and some parts were already done. It would be tempting to do the rear brakes, but for that, the brake shield must be attached to something which is the rear axle. Therefore, I intend to go for the axle. Compared to the ones I already did, (of course, the one for the Toronado excepted as the car is FWD), the construction is different: for this car, the rear axle housing is constituted with 2 symmetrical stamped steel parts welded at the junction. I will try the same, but I need something to make a die to shape the parts. What I have in brass or wood is either too short or too thin; I'll have to look in my store room what I could use. However, it's too cold there now for that.
    As there are other parts for the rear axle, I began with the end of the torque tube (the drive shaft is inside) and the mating part from the diff. If the end of the torque tube is a pure part done on the lathe, its different with the mating element: there are 10 bosses (it's the best word I found for that; is that correct?) for the 10 studs. How can I do that? I did first the tube with a flange on the lathe, noting that this tube is slightly conical.
    Then I began to mill indentations; the main purpose of the indentations is to locate the bosses I will silver solder. As the tube with flange is conical, I had to attach it at the end of the torque tube with short screws.



    The bosses were adjusted to the indentations and silver soldered when 2 were ready, until all 10 pieces were done.





    Now, I will have to drill the bosses for the studs.


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #120

  15. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    By looking at the differential's pictures I have, something was obvious: the ends of the diff at the wheels are separate parts assembled by welding to the main body. It's not important to know, but I still wonder if the machining was dome before or after welding. For my needs, I choose the solution "before" because the solution "after" is not suitable with my tools.
    Therefore, I machined 2 short tubes with the flange for the brake shield; this move will allow me to complete the rear brakes. The correct orientation of the brake shields on the main body will be easy then.
    The attached picture is sowing at the top the inside of a drum; a steel bushing was inserted into the hub. On the real cars, this is a ball bearing.
    On the left side, there is a view from the inside of a brake shield with a short tube emerging. On the real car, the wheel bearing is installed on that tube; most of the car weight is not carried by the axle shaft but by the differential tube. This arrangement was called 3/4 floating. Heavy trucks have the full floating type where the axle shafts have just the function of transmitting the power. On more recent cars with RWD, the axle shafts are supporting all the weight and transmitting the power.
    On the right side, the brake shield is seen from outside; the emerging tube will be inserted into the diff and soft soldered.




    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #121

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