Close

Page 7 of 8 FirstFirst ... 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 LastLast
Results 91 to 105 of 120
    1. Kit: , by (Yearly Subscriber) Roger Zimmermann is offline
      Builder Last Online: Feb 2020 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/12 Rating:  Thanks: 2
      Started: 07-26-19 Build Revisions: Never  
      Supported Scratch Built

      Before the Mark II was finished, I was thinking that I need some rest and maybe stopping modeling completely.
      After a few months "without", I noticed that I'm missing something. But, what to do? A new 10-years project is out of question, I need something less complex.
      After a while, it was clear that I had to do something with Cadillac. But what? The answer came rather quickly: a 1930 to 1933 Cadillac V-16 engine and frame, as a rolling frame.
      I have some contacts with people restoring the second version: 1932/33 which differs framewise from the first version 1930/31.
      I will have to do new things, like wire wheels! I searched in this forum for a tutorial, but found nothing. However , I do remember that somebody did recently (1 to 2 years) wire wheels. Can somebody tell me where to search?


      1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
      Show Complete First Post

      Show Your Support

      • This build may not be copied, reproduced or published elsewhere without author's permission.
        Please note: The first post will be displayed at the top of every page.
    JOIN THE SMC ALLIANCE NOW

  1. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
    Name
    Roger
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    2,716
    That's correct, Dan. As I'm building for me, no other gal or guy is allowed to operate the various elements. I'm also trying as far as possible to make moving element rather robust, using sometimes mild steel. This is also adding to the complexity of the model: something which must not be functional can be done more simple. To each his own!

    Cars from this time were rather simple: many parts, pure mechanical devices. Probably not all were so carefully build like Cadillacs were: for example, the lever I pictured recently was installed with a needle bearing on the brake shield. Probably cheaper cars would just have a bronze bushing for the same configuration. The solutions retained were rather logical but to reproduce them on a scale model is another matter.
    As an example: I began to reproduce the large lever you can see at the right on the picture of the original assembly.



    It has a strange shape, but it was very ingenious: the nut at one end was used to finely adjust the brake shoes. This nut pulled or pushed a rod connected to the splined hub, modifying the position of the hub in relation to the lever.
    As my project is to make a rolling frame, many details will be seen. Therefore, I had to reproduce the splined shaft & hub. I will not add the provision to adjust the brakes, because this detail would ad too much complexity at this scale.
    The question was: how to do the splines? By chance, I had a milling cutter with the appropriate width. I imagined that I could do a shaft in brass and broach a piece of brass 1.5mm thick. To my satisfaction, the splined shaft was good looking. With a pilot hub, I entered the shaft into the hole of a scrap piece of brass, put the assembly in the wise and put pressure. I saw small bits of brass and was thinking that life is good, the tool is making its way. When the shaft was through, I pushed it back and, to my dismay, I saw that the teeth were just shaved! Obviously, my solution was not good. I reluctantly took a piece of mild steel and did the splines on that shaft. Contrary to my fear, the milling cutter had no trouble to work on that mild steel.
    Another hole, another test: still no good: the teeth were still there, but pushed back, creating a bulge. Not good for a part which should have a snug fitting! I came to the conclusion that broaching can only be done with a tempered steel shaft. My milling cutter will be instantly destroyed if I make an single attempt!
    Another brain storming was needed. By chance, I have a large stock of dentist milling tools; the shaft's diameter was near to the desired shaft diameter!
    I removed from that milling tool what was not needed and, with a diamond covered disc, I made an approximate splined shaft which was to be used as a first pass.



    The definitive splined shaft would then finish the female splines.
    This time, the whole process was a success. With the tempered shaft, I could do the approximate broaching; the final treatment was done with the shaft which will be used on the model. There is an inconvenient with this method: shaft and lever must be indexed and will not be interchangeable as my machining is not precise enough. This add a bit to the complexity, but as there are only 4 shaft and lever pairs, it can be done. And, fortunately, the parts are the same for the front and rear brakes.









    On the pictures, that lever is just an approximative shape. I wanted first to be sure of the broaching process before doing the final shape.


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #92

  2. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
    Name
    don
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    1,124
    Hello Roger, nice work of course. I’m surprised how useful your diamond sintered bits are. The ones available to me are handy but I thought the diamond would have worn off on the steel. I’ll have to try that. Did you use them/it at high speed? any coolant? -I would have reached for a ceramic cut-off disc.

    A “cheat” might have been to cut those flutes into the edge of a flanged pin.

    But that’s a “cheat” and nothing would have been learned, I would have done as you did.

    There’s a lot of satisfaction in doing things right.
    QUOTE QUOTE #93

  3. markus68's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
    Name
    Markus
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    367
    I just talked about the brake system. A lot of things will be functional (pistons, brake booster, doorlocks and much more)
    QUOTE QUOTE #94

  4. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
    Name
    Roger
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    2,716
    Don, as we say in French, you are putting eggs on a stick with your flanged pin. First, I don't know what it is and if, I should have something like that, which I doubt!
    Those diamond sintered bits are very useful; I'm using them mainly on brass. Sometimes on soft solder, but they get rather quickly clogged. They do work well on steel, also tempered one, but I don't take too much at each pass, because of the flexibility of the whole (machine and cutting tool). This is what I used on the tempered shaft:



    To get the proper width of the splines, I had to go up and down with the chuck, because that disk is 0.5mm thick and the indentations had to be 0.7mm.

    I'm using those tools dry; and the RPMs were 2450. I could go with 4000 RPMs, but the machine is then too noisy.


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #95

  5. gigglingmonkey's Avatar Active Member
    Name
    Mick
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    25
    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Zimmermann View Post
    As I have almost no knowledge in motorcycle, you must know! Maybe the words "rolling frame" is also incorrect in my case...
    Rolling chassis is the normal term for a chassis with suspension, rear axle and wheel/tyres fitted. Can also include engine and drive line.

    By The Way I am very impressed with your Avanti model

    mick in glen innes OZ
    don't follow me, I'm making it up as I go
    QUOTE QUOTE #96

  6. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
    Name
    Roger
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    2,716
    Thanks Mick! Indeed, this is what I would like to do, with the engine and drive line


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #97

  7. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
    Name
    Roger
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    2,716
    The next task was to shape the levers for the brake cam actuation lever. Those tiny parts required a lot of work as usual. Both parts on the right side have some dots stamped on them as reference mark for the shaft as they are not interchangeable; the line you can see is for the proper indexing for the shaft for the same reason. Once installed on the brake shields, the dots will be on the inner side, therefore they will not be seen. The pins at the end of the shafts will help to locate the cams prior to silver soldering.



    I still have to add one or two details to those levers; it will then be the turn to do the bearing for the shafts. On the real vehicle, the bearing is adjustable by loosing a nut and applying the brakes; I think I will skip this feature as the brake shoes will anyway be also adapted to each drum and brake shield. Sure, this practice is contrary to the one of Mr. Leyland; the purpose of my construction is not the same!


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #98

  8. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
    Name
    Roger
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    2,716
    With the addition of a stud, large nut and the locking "spring" for that nut, the first actuating lever is finished. The equalization of the brakes could be done with the large nut at the end of the lever. I don't know if that locking spring was efficient to block the nut; I suppose it was the case as this system was used during some years. Still 3 to do!




    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #99

  9. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
    Name
    Roger
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    2,716
    Still working on the brake system at the shields and it's not yet over! For those who are not familiar with these very old cars (I was not myself some months ago!), the brake shield at the right is showing how the system is functioning: a cable will be attached at the free eye on the right; to brake, the cable is pulling the lever to the left. The connecting lever is moving the cam lever in the same direction.
    The brake shield at the left is seen from behind. The still unborn cam will be soldered to the steel shaft and, by turning, will push both brake shoes towards the drum. Easy!



    Are the brake shields ready now? Not quite: still missing is a pin as anchor for an outside return spring; both shoes guides are still unborn as well as the anchor for the cable.
    The rear brakes are practically identical. The sole notable difference is the actuation of the cam lever: it's not done with a cable but with a shaft and a lever.


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #100

  10. YHOR's Avatar Active Member
    Name
    Jorge
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    14
    Eres un capo. Te lo digo en español :)
    QUOTE QUOTE #101

  11. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
    Name
    Roger
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    2,716
    Gracias Jorge! Sorry that's almost my sole word I can in Spanish!


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #102

  12. Egon's Avatar Moderator
    Name
    egon
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    1,275
    Translated from spanish: You are a bonnet. I tell you in Spanish. ??
    There are a progam in google to translate your language to english.
    Last edited by Egon; 01-26-20 at 02:16 PM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #103

  13. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
    Name
    don
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    1,124
    Chapeau!

    “Tip my hat”

    “Hats off to you”

    Not a literal translation, but one in spirit.

    Shared by many Roger, from Austria to Australia, New Zealand to England, and of course the Americas North and South!
    QUOTE QUOTE #104

  14. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
    Name
    don
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Posts
    1,124
    Or maybe your the best?
    QUOTE QUOTE #105

  15. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
    Name
    Roger
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    2,716
    Capo: the chief; but I'm not. I'm maybe not too bad but certainnly not the best!


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #106

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Quick Scale Calculator

 
Scale Calculator   Scale Factor   Real Size:     + Deluxe Scale Calculator
  1: th   Which equals Convert measurement: Reset or clear:  
  Any Scale   Scale Size:     + Deluxe Metric Calculator
 
Top