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    1. Kit: , by (Yearly Subscriber) Roger Zimmermann is offline
      Builder Last Online: Jan 2020 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/12 Rating:  Thanks: 2
      Started: 07-26-19 Build Revisions: Never  
      Supported Scratch Built

      Before the Mark II was finished, I was thinking that I need some rest and maybe stopping modeling completely.
      After a few months "without", I noticed that I'm missing something. But, what to do? A new 10-years project is out of question, I need something less complex.
      After a while, it was clear that I had to do something with Cadillac. But what? The answer came rather quickly: a 1930 to 1933 Cadillac V-16 engine and frame, as a rolling frame.
      I have some contacts with people restoring the second version: 1932/33 which differs framewise from the first version 1930/31.
      I will have to do new things, like wire wheels! I searched in this forum for a tutorial, but found nothing. However , I do remember that somebody did recently (1 to 2 years) wire wheels. Can somebody tell me where to search?


      1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
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  1. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    The knuckles are now ready with the addition of the adjusting device. Of course mine is not functional. You can see that the surfacer from the axle is already damaged. That's not a problem; in due time it will get a new coat. The goal was to cover the surfaces with are difficult to clean. What's next? Well, Christmas is almost at the door!

    Enjoy that period of the year!




    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #77

  2. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    What could I do next? Rather logically, the brake shields should be next because they are attached to the knuckles. But now, I'm doing the rear ones! Too much red wine lately? No! the reason is that the rear shields are rather simple and the front ones are more complex. The outside diameter is the same, that's all.
    The dies I did are modified dies used for the Mark II wheel covers. Once the real shields ready, those dies will be modified to do the front ones, sparing that way a lot of material.
    Here are the rear dies:



    This is my method to press the brass with the dies:



    I was glad to see that the first shield went out without problem; the surface had some waves which could be almost eliminated by rubbing the high spots with a hammer. Unfortunately, the second shield developed a crack as you can see:



    Doing another one is not a guarantee of success, therefore, I repaired the crack by silver soldering a piece of brass inserted into the crack.
    The next operation was to shape the outer flange; unfortunately this picture is no good but both shields were already finished when I opened the picture. The flange is shaped with a hammer on the die as making another tool just for that was a waste of resources. A small hammer can do wonders!



    One finished shield:



    Later, these shields will be adjusted on the rear axle; the 6 attaching holes drilled, plus a number of parts for the brakes will be added. I just can say that mechanical brakes are very complex, compared to the hydraulic ones. The bonus: I may have the brakes functional on all 4 wheels.


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #78

  3. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    After the rear brake shields were ready, it was time to modify the dies to press the front shields. At first, I was thinking that the shape is easy; well it was the case to do the separate male insert. The female job was not that easy. The almost rectangular cavity could be milled, but the half round one was more difficult to get. Milling was not an option, at least not with my basic machine. I removed almost all the metal with grinding and finished it with a hand tool, shaving the brass until the insert was flush with the flat surface.
    The male insert was then attached to the other die with a screw.
    Then came the moment of truth: will the brass be torn as the cavity is rather deep? Nothing bad happened at mid way, but at the end it was torn at the end of the cavity. To repair it, I cut the damaged spot, pressed a bit brass, adjusted and silver soldered it. This repair took much more time than pressing the shield!
    Now, I have to do the second one; most probably the same damage will occur; then I can show with a picture or two what I intended to explain.






    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #79

  4. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Happy New Year Roger!

    Have you tried Copper? Once annealed it does form easier than Brass and is not so quick to work harden. -Silver also forms very well.

    -Don
    QUOTE QUOTE #80

  5. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    All the above can be soldered, but if your planning a mechanical attachment? -thin aluminum presses well and if needed, it is easy to anneal
    QUOTE QUOTE #81

  6. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Happy New Year to you and the other people looking or posting to this forum!
    I used copper for the hood and trunk lid for the Mark II. For the brake shields, I had no 0.3mm copper and I had no intension to use it: too soft once the part is ready. The brakes will be functional; the brake shields must be strong enough for that task!


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #82

  7. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Happy New Year to all!
    The end of 2019 was not kind with my front brake shields, I will relate it later. First I'm showing the various steps to shape the second brake shield. I prepared a piece of brass large enough; drilled some small holes to prevent too much damage.



    After 1/3 stroke, I checked how the metal is taking its new shape; no problem to report.



    At 2/3 of the stroke, the metal is already torn at one end. Dies builder is a profession; probably there is a method to avoid the issue (choice of metal, various steps, etc.).



    Once completely pressed, the damage is obvious, but smaller than with the first shield. A patch will be silver soldered anyway.



    I began then to trim the center, to make the needed space for the knuckle. The first problem I encountered was with the shape of the recess at the top: I did the corner's cuts at 45 and I could not put the knuckle high enough! By looking at the pictures I have, I saw that the corners are at about 25 to 30. I modified both dies to the new shape and I tried to rework the shields by pressing them again. No problem, the brass was soft enough to accept the new shape. Then, I could finish the aperture for the knuckle. I put a drum on the "assembly" (the shield being just pushed on the knuckle) to note that the drum is resting on the brake shield! What to do to get those 0.5mm interference away?
    Well, the first step was to modify the ears on which the shields are attached by removing 0.25mm. More was not advisable because they were 0.7mm thick. Then, I modify the dies once more by carving the recess by an additional 0.2mm. Here again, I got no protest from the shields and no damage.
    The third step I will do is to modify the inside of the drums to have just enough clearance.
    I assembled a brake shield on a knuckle; I still have a slight interference; the drums modification will get rid of that.



    While I was with the camera, I redid a picture showing how the flange are shaped with a small hammer.




    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #83

  8. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    During our short vacation in France, I took the raw material which will be the pattern to shape the frame and I began to work on it. It's 5mm thick, therefore, I cannot prepare it at home, I have no suitable vise. That piece of brass is 420 mm long or 16.6"
    Back home, I'm continuing the brake shields by adding the various element to make the brakes operable.




    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #84

  9. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Recently, I added a small shaft for a brake lever at the front brake shields as well as the insert for the bolt limiting the steering angle. One challenge was to drill a 0.4mm for the cotter pin. It's good to practice now because there are a lot of cotter pins on that frame! By the way, is there a supply of very small cotter pins?
    Then, I began the lever which will be actuated by a cable. I'm adding a picture showing the set-up for the front wheels; the picture is from a restored 1932 V-8 brake shield assembly, which is almost identical to the V-16 one.



    To replicate cast parts is taking a lot of time; I was aware of it! As I cannot cast small or large parts, I have to do them differently. The next picture is showing the lever and limiting bolt from the RH brake shield, + the parts which are constituting that lever: a shaft, 3 "bearings". The smaller ones are drilled entirely, the large one only up to the middle. The assembly is done with soft solder. After that, the final holes for the various pins/shaft are drilled. Finally, the width of the assembly will be corrected; to facilitate the construction, the "bearings" are larger (or longer if you like).




    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #85

  10. markus68's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Roger at its best. Markus
    QUOTE QUOTE #86

  11. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Thanks Markus; however I have the impression that your statement is exaggerated…
    By the way, the "home" for the grease fitting was added to the levers this afternoon (if you are looking at the real parts picture and mine, you will see that the lever was incomplete). I did not count the grase fittings up to now; their number is impressive!
    Markus, I just had a look at your first pages. Your brass work is impressive, I just can repeat it! I also saw that your model is equipped with hydraulic brakes. What a huge simplification! Mechanical brakes can be build to be functional on a scale model, but the amount of parts needed is incredible.


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    Last edited by Roger Zimmermann; 01-16-20 at 11:57 AM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #87

  12. markus68's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Okay Roger, you are just a brilliant modeler ;-) Thank you. The handbrake will be functional.
    QUOTE QUOTE #88

  13. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    AH! Ah! Operating hand brake? That's the minimum!


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #89

  14. markus68's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Maybe but it is not the right time to think about it intensely. We will see.
    QUOTE QUOTE #90

  15. PROPELLER's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Static or functional. And functional for Roger as usual... And I don't agree!
    Except for the doors, everything quickly becomes fragile on these scales. Three or four operations by a foreing guy and it is certainly soon a disaster .
    But it's only my point of view...

    Dan.
    QUOTE QUOTE #91

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