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    1. Kit: , by (Yearly Subscriber) Roger Zimmermann is offline
      Builder Last Online: Aug 2022 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/12 Rating:  (4 votes - 5.00 average) Thanks: 8
      Started: 07-26-19 Build Revisions: Never  
      Supported Scratch Built

      Before the Mark II was finished, I was thinking that I need some rest and maybe stopping modeling completely.
      After a few months "without", I noticed that I'm missing something. But, what to do? A new 10-years project is out of question, I need something less complex.
      After a while, it was clear that I had to do something with Cadillac. But what? The answer came rather quickly: a 1930 to 1933 Cadillac V-16 engine and frame, as a rolling frame.
      I have some contacts with people restoring the second version: 1932/33 which differs framewise from the first version 1930/31.
      I will have to do new things, like wire wheels! I searched in this forum for a tutorial, but found nothing. However , I do remember that somebody did recently (1 to 2 years) wire wheels. Can somebody tell me where to search?


      1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
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  1. JunkGTZ's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Larry
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    I would suppose that it makes it easier to adjust alignment should such adjustments be needed (and I suspect they would be over time). What I find amazing is the rods are not larger - say half the diameter of the torque tube. I'm guessing that between the mountings on the leaf springs, and the torque tube not having any U joint, that it provides enough rigidity given that the car is not a race vehicle and would be driven with more comfort than agility in mind.
    QUOTE QUOTE #857

  2. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    Thanks for trying to solve the question; unfortunately, it's not correct. As a help: I wanted to make the threads also short on both sides, but I had to do that way.
    Regarding the dimensions: the torque tube has a diameter of 82 mm (3.2") and the struts 17.5 mm (.7") I suppose that the struts were made with good steel! There is one U joint right behind the transmission. After that, it's solid. This design was used on many vehicles from that time.


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #858

  3. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    The strength of the struts are two against one, and we're presuming that this is a "good design"? -It may have been an acceptable compromise?

    This is a Cadillac, not a Rolls-Royce. (Good enough is acceptable here.)
    Last edited by MODEL A MODEL; 05-31-22 at 04:39 AM.
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #859

  4. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    I assume that those struts are working on traction to avoid that the rear axle being bent while driving on a pothole.
    Don, do you know why the threads are longer at one end?


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #860

  5. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Hmm?

    My short answer is that you made them that way because it is correct! You aren't one to just invent details.

    My second answer is that during assembly, the order of assembly has the rear axle finished without the drive shaft in place, and having the longer threaded section better allows for making the fit of the complete drive train snug?

    And/or the struts are used on several models, of varying design, and the extra thread makes this possible?

    (Remember, I never finished school)
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #861

  6. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    Or?

    Between two fixed points on your model, you needed the extra threaded area to allow the struts to be placed in position, first the forward end, and then the axle end. Retaining nuts were first threaded on, and then after placement and some adjusting, the second nuts, fore and aft were then screwed on?
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #862

  7. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Exactly! If the threads are short, it's no more possible to insert the struts when the nuts are installed. No matter if it's a 1:1 1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine construction or a scale model!


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #863

  8. Richard Bartrop's Avatar Active Member
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    Maybe it's the tension of the struts that does the job?
    QUOTE QUOTE #864

  9. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Bartrop View Post
    Maybe it's the tension of the struts that does the job?
    Probably, but I have no first hand experience with real cars from that time.


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #865

  10. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    Before I go to the rear brakes (as the rear suspension is a necessity to do that), I wanted to continue with the tires. The next step is to create the negative molds with a suitable material. I began with the side walls, allowing enough space between the RTV 1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine molds and the exterior diameter. Then, as I did long ago, I attached the walls to a brass plate with masking 1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine tape.

    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine-427-prepair-jpg

    Then I did a mix with resin 1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine and hardener and evacuated the trapped air.

    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine-428-taking-air-jpg

    After the majority of the bubbles was gone, I poured the liquid into the molds; then the trouble began: as the mix is also as thin as water, the resin 1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine began to soften the glue from the tape and oozed out. I tried to do a dam with the plasticine; it was good for a few minutes, no more. To reduce the gap between the plate and the walls, I put some weight on the walls. This reduced somewhat the "flow", but not stopped it.

    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine-429-mess-jpg

    During almost the whole afternoon, I catch as much resin 1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine as possible and put it back where it belongs. When the resin 1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine began to get thicker, I could do something else.
    The next morning, the resin 1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine was almost set and I began to remove as well as I could the masking 1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine tape and the oozed resin 1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine . One thing is sure: that product stick well on brass!

    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine-430-day-jpg

    In one or two days, I will take the RTV 1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine molds away. For the moment, the product is still flexible. Remember: on the notice, the material is set after 15 days!


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #866

  11. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    Oh no!
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #867

  12. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    Roger,

    I have cast a lot of stuff over the years, and a few years ago, I started working on top of drip-pans. The plastic ones that slide under cars to catch dripping oil. They are pretty cheap, and resistant to solvents. Cured resins usually chip off. -I also lay down plastic trash bags instead of newspaper. Cutting the bottom and one side of the bags creates a very usable, disposable drop cloth.

    Cheap plastic trays also work.

    -Don
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #868

  13. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Oh yes, Don! For this task, two elements were different compared to previous jobs: the masking 1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine tape and the RTV 1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine . Polyester resin 1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine is getting cured quicker than the product I'm using now, but the smell is awful. This RTV 1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine can be worked inside, which is a great advantage.
    Regarding my use of paper: I had no time to search something better suitable, the product oozed rather quickly! I have plenty of plastic foil in my store room, at 12 miles from home.


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #869

  14. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Half success...This morning, I separated the molds from the brass plate. I noticed that the RTV 1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine went under the positive molds; this is the first time that it happened. I will have to remove some material from the negative mold's flange, otherwise the tires will be too wide and the width irregular.
    There are some tiny bubbles which did not went away; I don't think this will be an issue with the tires.
    I had to cut the center of the positive molds to remove them from the hardened resin 1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine ; if I would do new half molds with the resin 1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine , I would have to do new positive molds because I need the center to locate the half molds during the tires "production".

    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine-431-jpg1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine-432-negative-molds-jpg


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #870

  15. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    Parallel to the tire saga, I'm continuing with the torque tube/rear brakes. There is a relay between the main actuating lever and the rear axle which is attached to the torque tube. Honestly, I don't know its purpose; there must be one...
    Anyway, I finished both pieces just to discover that either the brackets screwed to the torque tube are too short or the levers are too long: if I had the rods going to the rear axle, they would touch the rods which is not good. By looking at my pictures, it seems that the levers are too long. However, I will redo the brackets, there is less work involved.

    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine-433-relay-jpg1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine-434-relay-jpg


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #871

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