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    1. Kit: , by (Yearly Subscriber) Roger Zimmermann is offline
      Builder Last Online: Oct 2021 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/12 Rating:  (4 votes - 5.00 average) Thanks: 8
      Started: 07-26-19 Build Revisions: Never  
      Supported Scratch Built

      Before the Mark II was finished, I was thinking that I need some rest and maybe stopping modeling completely.
      After a few months "without", I noticed that I'm missing something. But, what to do? A new 10-years project is out of question, I need something less complex.
      After a while, it was clear that I had to do something with Cadillac. But what? The answer came rather quickly: a 1930 to 1933 Cadillac V-16 engine and frame, as a rolling frame.
      I have some contacts with people restoring the second version: 1932/33 which differs framewise from the first version 1930/31.
      I will have to do new things, like wire wheels! I searched in this forum for a tutorial, but found nothing. However , I do remember that somebody did recently (1 to 2 years) wire wheels. Can somebody tell me where to search?


      1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
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  1. JunkGTZ's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Larry
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    Your attention to detail is amazing. I'm sure you've probably thought of this and decided against, but the only thing that comes to mind for your rubber boot is to find a piece of tubing that is the proper diameter and slide some thin slices of rubber tubing or really small O rings over it to create the ribs and dip it in some of that liquid rubber used for putting handles on tools such as pliers. You could probably pull the tube out but it would be a difficult task to get the O rings out. Maybe you wouldn't need to do that. It's expensive for such a small part but maybe it will be useful for other projects you have.

    https://www.amazon.com/RUST-OLEUM-32...1453180&sr=8-1
    QUOTE QUOTE #647

  2. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    Larry, thanks for your idea. Mine is a bit different: create a negative mold in two parts and a positive one and then peel the rubber boot out. By using a solid wax for the positive mold, a peeling will not be necessary: just some heat will do the job. A lot of work for a tiny part, but I have time! I do other parts for now, I'm letting that aside for the moment.


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #648

  3. PaulPK's Avatar Active Member
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    Paul
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    Looking good. The linkage alignment is perfect
    QUOTE QUOTE #649

  4. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    Hello Roger,

    Remember my experiment with the "Plasti-Dip"? That stuff they sell to dip tool handles in? -I had quickly, hastily, coiled some wire around a wood dowel, and then wrapped that with some Teflon tape. (Plumbers tape) Quickly brushed on the Plasti-Dip, and was impressed with the potential. -once dry, the dowel slides out, the coil of wire pulls out, and the Teflon tape does not bond to anything, so it too can be pulled out. With some fore thought as to the design this may have some potential?

    Instead of wood, wax or even soap, could be used as a core. And solder to make the coil. -I think that the bellows your going to make were more like an accordion and not a coil, like a radiator hose, but on a small scale, in place, maybe a coil is not visible? -You can of course machine the wax, or soap? Allow for the thickness of the plastic covering?

    (Student telling teacher)

    Happy May 22nd!

    "Got to go now"

    Bye

    -Don
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #650

  5. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    Yes, Don, I remember. I used it for the air intake hose for the Mark II engine. I just applied some paint which was good enough as the hose is not moving.
    Here the situation is a bit different: the inside diameter is 1mm and the boot must contract and retract with the movement of the brake pedal. I used once to buy Plasti-dip from the US when surface mail was still possible. I'm sure that product or equivalent can be found locally but the method I described above is at 99% a sure possibility.
    Anyway, thanks for the suggestion!


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #651

  6. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    1mm ID!

    Too small for me!
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #652

  7. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    I know, I know! These are the difficulties from scale 1:12. Scale 1:4 has other difficulties I could not overcome!


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #653

  8. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    Still working at the brake system. I added 3 lever on the rear rocker shaft and did the clevis for the booster. There should be a rubber boot between the brake pedal lever and the booster; it will be added later.
    More levers/small pieces will next be added to the system.

    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine-315-brake-system-jpg


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #654

  9. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    The previous picture was showing the rear rocker shaft which is responsible for the rear brakes. Now I did the one for the front brakes. As the actuating levers are located outside the bearings, they must be removable. Fortunately, I kept the "tooling" for the actuators located at each drum, so I could do the necessary splines. Maybe the shaft is a tad too small (0.2 - 0.3mm) and on those levers, there are more than 6 splines. To reproduce that exactly would be too much work. However, I noticed a strange detail when looking at my pictures: the LH actuating lever is looking like a blade (mine is probably too thick) while the RH actuating lever is a more conventional in design. And this is not an error on that car: I have also pictures from a 1932 V-8 brake system, it's identical. The parts book is also clear; the RH lever has not the same part number as the LH one.
    My theory is the following: the LH actuating lever must have some flexibility, and the RH one is rigid. Maybe when doing an heavy braking, the LH lever is flexing if the RH one can go further, like a differential actuation. I don't see a different explanation but I don't know everything!

    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine-316-front-rocker-shaft-jpg1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine-317-rh-actuating-lever-jpg1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine-318-lh-actuating-lever-jpg


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #655

  10. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    Interesting?
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #656

  11. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    Still working on the brakes. Both rocker shafts are now complete and temporarily installed. I saw that the levers actuating the front brakes were too short and the rods going to the front wheels would interfere with the cross member #2. Probably my measurement in Germany was correct, but the rocker shaft may be located too low or the crossmember not 100% correct. To avoid the issue, I made the a tad longer with some modification.
    The cotter pins you may be able to see are not the definitive ones; I had to do something simple for the testing.
    As far as I can see it, the brake system will be really functioning. Certainly not perfectly, but at the speed the model will be used, there is no danger and no recall will be issued!

    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine-319-brake-system-jpg1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine-320-brake-system-jpg


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #657

  12. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    Worried about 1/12th scale consumer confidence?
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #658

  13. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    Not too much!


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #659

  14. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    Brakes, continuation. Indeed, I was almost closing this chapter by finishing the hand brake. And then, the trouble began: when the clevis with the rod was installed on the hand brake lever, I saw to my dismay that the décor on the transmission side was pushing the lever to the side and the pawl was no more contacting the ratchet. I bent a tad the lever to clear the transmission side. No interference anymore, but the pawl did not contact the ratchet anymore. No problem, two thick washer will correct the distance.
    But...but if I'm doing that, the starter motor will be impossible to install.
    The sole solution was to diminish the thickness of the décor, which was done after removing the engine from the frame and separating the transmission. After I was thinking there is enough material away, a quick check said that I'm right. The power train was again installer on the frame (it quickly done) and I could try the brake system. Another trouble: by pushing the brake pedal 1/3 of his travel, the rod from the hand brake was contacting the actuating lever for the RH rear brake. Even if I tried to make my parts as precise as possible, I certainly missed some details. I solved the situation by shortening the actuating lever and doing a longer link for the hand brake.
    Now, it seems that the system is functioning as I hoped it would do.
    First picture: the brake system is not actuated.
    Second picture: the hand brake is on; the elongated holes at the clevis from the brake pedal allowed the main rod to go forwards, without disturbing the brake pedal.
    Third picture: the brake pedal is pushed, moving all actuating levers; the link I had to redo is tilting to the rear, allowing the hand brake lever to stay at his place.
    Hydraulic brakes eliminated all those problems but created others!

    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine-321-action-jpg1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine-322-hand-brake-jpg1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine-323-pushed-pedal-jpg


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #660

  15. markus68's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Markus
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    Looks good. I think you are working day and night. ;-) Markus
    QUOTE QUOTE #661

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