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    1. Kit: , by (Yearly Subscriber) Roger Zimmermann is offline
      Builder Last Online: Jun 2022 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/12 Rating:  (4 votes - 5.00 average) Thanks: 8
      Started: 07-26-19 Build Revisions: Never  
      Supported Scratch Built

      Before the Mark II was finished, I was thinking that I need some rest and maybe stopping modeling completely.
      After a few months "without", I noticed that I'm missing something. But, what to do? A new 10-years project is out of question, I need something less complex.
      After a while, it was clear that I had to do something with Cadillac. But what? The answer came rather quickly: a 1930 to 1933 Cadillac V-16 engine and frame, as a rolling frame.
      I have some contacts with people restoring the second version: 1932/33 which differs framewise from the first version 1930/31.
      I will have to do new things, like wire wheels! I searched in this forum for a tutorial, but found nothing. However , I do remember that somebody did recently (1 to 2 years) wire wheels. Can somebody tell me where to search?


      1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
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  1. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Before I began with the complex casting 1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine supporting the brake and clutch pedals (for which a member from the AACA forum sent me critical dimensions, thanks again Alex!), I did both covers which were missing: the one for the idle gear and the one for the clutch ventilation. Now I can, with the help from many pictures, design that support attached to the transmission.

    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine-300-covers-jpg


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    Last edited by Roger Zimmermann; 04-17-21 at 07:35 AM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #632

  2. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    That tiny stupid support for the pedals took me a long time to understand its general shape! Finally, I got it more or less right; I hope that the position of the pedal's shaft is not too far away from the reality.
    When I did the pictures from that frame and engine, the free-wheeling system was removed or was never installed as I don't know if it was standard or optional. As the bracket is the same for all V-12 and V-16 engines, "my" bracket has the provisions to install the valving (there are the tiny holes flanking the shaft), but will stay that way. Anyway, as I have pictures from a 1932 V-8 equipped with that system, I'm wondering how both boosters could be attached to the frame; I have the impression that there is not enough space.
    I did also the 4 "yoke adjusting quadrants" and temporarily installed them. It was wise: I noticed that the screw behind the hand brake lever was interfering with the lever. I made it thinner 1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine in that location and reduced the height of the bold attaching that quadrant.

    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine-301-pedals-support-jpg1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine-302-pedeal-support-jpg

    The next goal? The gear shift. A member from the AACA forum gave me its length (another dimension I skipped when I could have measure it) and it's time for it.

    Most all my brass parts are silver soldered. For years, I had Castolin 1802 rods in 1 mm or 1.5 mm diameter. That specific solder is no more available because it contains cadmium. The manufacturer is now selling the Castolin 1800 which is cadmium free, but has a higher content of silver. The temperature needed is almost the same, so I can do the switch. There is just one problem: nobody is selling those rods by the piece as it was the case years ago. The minimum quantity is 1/2 kg for about $ 650.00. Finally, I gave up with my researches and ordered that minimum quantity. I will probably have silver soldering material for the next 100 years! Anyway, a local jeweler is interested to buy some quantity from that material, but I don't know how many rods...


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #633

  3. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    I too, have over-stocked all the solder I'll ever need for the rest of my life!

    I also can't resist buying woods. Well figured or attractive colored woods. Pear, Almond, Apple, Box, Wenge, and Holly. ( . . . )
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #634

  4. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Back to your modeling, -really excellent work Roger!

    I know you don't like getting ahead of yourself, but I have to ask. What is the final finish of these parts? I'm not that familiar with 30's Cadillacs, and can't really, even guess.

    Again excellent work! You should teach!
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #635

  5. Jo NZ's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    For silver soldering brass I still use silver solders. I get them from jewellers suppliers, in 0.5mm sheets (for cutting into paillons - little bits!) or 1mm silver solder wire. It's available in 3 grades - easy, medium and hard - but I generally cope OK with easy. The melting temperature for hard solder is perilously close to the slump temperature of brass, so you need to be very careful using this grade.

    I'm also using a liquid flux - basic gold/silver flux that seems to work with most materials.

    Melting temperatures are:
    Hard 773C
    Med 747C
    Easy 711C

    Easy Flo is 681C
    Brass 954C

    Incidentally I have found a new source for pickling acid. I've been using "sparex" pickle, which is crystals of sodium bisulphite (mix with water). It's also sold as spa pool PH reducer from your local pool shop.
    QUOTE QUOTE #636

  6. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Thanks for the comments!
    @ Joe: the soldering rods I will get have a high silver content; the melting point is about 680C. The jeweler who is interested to buy some rods gave me some samples: a rod diameter 0.5mm and two small plates to be cut as paillons. The melting point is higher and the rod is too small: it's melting too early because my torch has not a focused flame. He offered to resell material he can get from his source but I prefer to use the material I'm accustomed.

    @ Don: Thanks for the comments! Me, teaching? sorry, my office/workshop is too small for that and going outside is a no go!
    By the way, the small support is an assembly of 10 separate parts, all silver soldered one after the other without getting a mess. The shaft is mild steel as the brake pedal may put some stress on it.

    The crankcase will be aluminum color; the block and heads will be black, like the bellhousing and transmission. Many parts were chromed which set the V-12 and V-16 apart from the regular engines. The frame will be "customer's choice" (standard was black) and for the moment I did not yet choose a color for that.


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #637

  7. PaulPK's Avatar Active Member
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    Roger, that is 1256F. Does that high a temperature warp thin brass? I did not realize you were soldering at such high temps.
    QUOTE QUOTE #638

  8. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    When I silver soldered the trunk floor from the Mark II, it was basically a flat piece of brass, not so thin, but I got effectively some warpage. I got rid of that with embossed reinforcements.
    Most of the time, what I'm silver soldering are short pieces rather thick and there is no problem. By silver soldering brass, the metal will be annealed and therefore weaker. That's something to take in consideration.


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #639

  9. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Indeed, a shifter is not that difficult to do, except that its diameter is not constant. It's not possible to machine it the usual way because, due to the length, its too flexible. I had to improvise doing a bit after the other, taking care that the shaft is not like a camel.
    As I like difficulties, I added a "H" grille into the transmission, used a ball from a bearing, added some small parts and now, the lever can be shifted to all four positions. Totally unnecessary, but fun!

    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine-303-grille-jpg1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine-304-shift-lever-jpg

    The next job: the brake and clutch pedals. I will do first the basic; the multitude of levers, springs and so on, especially for the brake system, will be added when the suspension will be added as I need the axles for the various rods.


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #640

  10. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Elegant !
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #641

  11. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Due to maintenance at my old cars scale 1:1 1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine , there was a slow activity with the model. Anyway, there is some news. I began the clutch and brake pedals. As I had not enough material 2mm thick, I silver soldered two 1 mm elements to have the adequate thickness at the base. The thickness at the top is about half; the pedal at the left is now ready for further working on it, the pedal at the right must still be "thinned".

    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine-305-pedals-jpg


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #642

  12. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Those crude brass parts evolved into something more near to the reality. On the first picture, the clutch pedal is on the left. In the reality, but pedal stops are adjustable; on my model, only the clutch pedal has its adjusting screw because I could not position the stopping hub in a position to skip the adjusting screw. The original hub is positioned on the shaft with splines, I just put a screw as the effort will not be that huge.

    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine-306-pedals-ready-jpg1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine-307-pedals-installed-jpg

    The next step: create the clutch lever which will be actuated by the clutch pedal. I'm skipping the freewheeling system to avoid too much complication.


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #643

  13. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Nowadays, a brake pedal is a pad with a lever on a shaft, period. It can push a rod or be connected one way or the other to an ABS system, but the pedal itself is easy. Not so with a car from the thirties with power brakes. There is a reaction lever attached to the pedal and an acting lever which is pulled by the vacuum system. I'm skipping further details as this is irrelevant for the model. I tried to build that system by simplifying some aspects, but in general the look is there. All is indeed simple, but the shape of the parts is not.
    On the pictures, you can see on the top the clevis which will pull a rod to activate the brakes. That clevis has an elongated hole; this is the method to avoid that the brake pedal is moved when the hand brake is activated.

    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine-312-brake-pedal-jpg1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine-311-brake-pedal-jpg


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #644

  14. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    While I was at the brake system, I did continue with the booster. Not a too difficult part do do, even if the rivets at both ends were maybe unnecessary to reproduce. The booster is attached to the frame with a support, for once not a casting 1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine but two stamped sheet metal parts spot welded together. It's what I did, with soft solder instead of spot welds. Unfortunately, that support is no good: it's too thick and should be positioned a tad towards the center of the frame. I will have to do another one, with thinner 1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine material.
    Why all that complication? Because the way it is now, I could not attach the rod coming from the brake pedal to the (not yet born) lever welded to the rocker shaft. With a gain over .5mm (0.02"), the rod position will be fine!
    Some explanation about the picture: the rod connecting the booster to the brake pedal is indeed a drill bit, with it I saw that the booster is not contacting the transmission's support and the future rod will be parallel to the frame's axis. The short axle to the booster is a temporary one.

    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine-314-booster-jpg


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #645

  15. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    It seems that I will continue with the brake system. One of the missing links is the connection between the brake pedal and the booster. A rod will be sliding into the booster and, as you can see it on the attached picture, that rod is protected by a rubber boot. With the material I have, it should be possible to make one which will effectively contract and expand, but it's a lot of work for a single part. Who has a better idea? That boot should be 11.3mm long (0.45"), a outside diameter of 3.6mm (0.14" and will have a stroke of 6mm (0.24").
    I searched into a scale model catalog, but found nothing suitable. Who has an idea?

    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine-dsc01316-jpg


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #646

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