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    1. Kit: , by (Yearly Subscriber) Roger Zimmermann is offline
      Builder Last Online: Apr 2021 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/12 Rating:  (4 votes - 5.00 average) Thanks: 7
      Started: 07-26-19 Build Revisions: Never  
      Supported Scratch Built

      Before the Mark II was finished, I was thinking that I need some rest and maybe stopping modeling completely.
      After a few months "without", I noticed that I'm missing something. But, what to do? A new 10-years project is out of question, I need something less complex.
      After a while, it was clear that I had to do something with Cadillac. But what? The answer came rather quickly: a 1930 to 1933 Cadillac V-16 engine and frame, as a rolling frame.
      I have some contacts with people restoring the second version: 1932/33 which differs framewise from the first version 1930/31.
      I will have to do new things, like wire wheels! I searched in this forum for a tutorial, but found nothing. However , I do remember that somebody did recently (1 to 2 years) wire wheels. Can somebody tell me where to search?


      1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
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  1. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    Yes of course the suspension and drive train. -My opinion is that the most graceful fender line is that of the Mercedes 540K, but the Cadillac's is not too far behind. Once you have completed the drive train, and suspension, oh! -I just realized, you haven't made tires yet. So I guess it's clear what you'll be doing through summer.

    Really great work Roger! Thank you for sharing! -Don
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #602

  2. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    Sometimes, I'm wandering from one element to another one, without relation between both. After the frame was ready, I was faced with the same question: and now? There are still hundreds of parts to be made, the choice is large enough! This time, I decided to finish one element: the transmission.
    The closing cover was just not yet done, not a big deal. This small part let me do many errors by not paying attention at what I was doing.
    I first did the flat part from the cover with a thick brass plate. Easy. Then I did the holes for the screws. As the location for the holes is done just with a rule, they are not perfectly spaced/aligned and I know that. With the flat element ready, I used it to drill the holes into the transmission's case. This implied that just one position of the cover's base would be right.
    When I silver soldered the curved part on the base, I managed to flip it over; in other words, I soldered the next part on what should be the surface contacting the transmission's case. Result: the hole were no more perfectly aligned. I enlarged 3 from the 6 until I could insert the screws.
    Then it was time to make a large hole in the curved part for the shift lever "tower". The position of it is not in the middle and here, I managed to do it at the wrong end! I had to enlarge more holes to be able to screw the cover...Fortunately, the bolt's heads are large enough to cover the holes...
    The remaining elements were added without problem. One of them is the shaft for the hand brake. The small cylinder at one end is representing the switch for the back-up lamp.

    The hand brake lever is therefore part of the transmission... I will continue with that. This is a monstrous lever half meter long which recall me the brake lever the "driver" from the cable cars in San Francisco are using, at least is what I saw in the seventies.

    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine-291-transmission-cover-jpg1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine-292-cover-installed-jpg


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #603

  3. Fresno's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Fred
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Zimmermann View Post
    Finally, the frame is ready: I fabricated the supports for the transmission and silver soldered them to the second cross member. With that done, it was rather easy to put the cross member into the frame (thanks its elasticity, I had not too much trouble to insert and remove it several times times) and soft soldering it. The rivets are not yet in place as you can see.
    The rubber bushings at the rear transmission was a wise decision, with my construction's variations, the holes in the supports are not perfectly aligned with the bushings.
    That second cross member is giving a significant torsion's resistance to the frame, but I'm sure that those frames are not very rigid and the road behavior was certainly miles away as what we have today. As almost all cars were made is a similar fashion, it was considered as "normal".

    Attachment 36219
    Beautiful! I wish I had the skills and the patience. Very inspiring. Thanks for sharing this build.
    QUOTE QUOTE #604

  4. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Hello Roger.

    The dark material is ?
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #605

  5. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    Thanks Fred!
    Don: That dark material is mild steel. This is the pivot for the hand brake; I wanted to have it strong enough. That pivot (or axle) has a threaded hole at its end for the vent system, therefore I could not do it with spring steel.


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #606

  6. markus68's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Patience is really important. Very nice part.
    QUOTE QUOTE #607

  7. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Thanks Markus! Patience is one thing, available time is also a factor!


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #608

  8. markus68's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Available time is the problem by now.
    QUOTE QUOTE #609

  9. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Yep...That's one element which is difficult to have when you have a job and a family...

    The hand brake lever is looking a lot like a sculpture from the Swiss Giacometti, but has no value compared to his "marvels"!
    For the moment, there is just the profile from that lever and the lower part is far from finished: there will be a fork for the pawl. I will first doing the upper part and then the lower one.
    On the real car, this lever is about 20" tall from the axle to the end...Imagine that into a car from today!

    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine-293-hand-brake-lever-jpg


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    Last edited by Roger Zimmermann; 04-06-21 at 10:44 AM.
    QUOTE QUOTE #610

  10. Nortley's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    "Imagine that is a car from today!" My old chevy pickup was 20 years newer than the Cadillac, yet many features such as the starter and drive line ball joint are repeated. I suppose GM stuck with something that worked.
    Scorpio - Builds models the way the prototype should have been built.
    QUOTE QUOTE #611

  11. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Buck, torque tubes were used a long time; Buick cars had that till 1960. For the '61 model year, the torque tube was gone.


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #612

  12. PaulPK's Avatar Active Member
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    Just one of those days when things go horribly wrong ... but you recovered it. Looks good.
    QUOTE QUOTE #613

  13. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    Hello Roger, the drive line "Ball", is that of Steel as well? It doesn't look like Brass. Maybe Markus has you trying German-Silver?
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #614

  14. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    Don, it's steel too. The flange for the torque tube will be painted, the "ball" will stay natural with a little grease to prevent rust.
    I bought some small German silver rods for the grease fittings. However, there are so many and not looking all the same I'm not sure if I will ad them.


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #615

  15. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    The contours of the nipples? They are probably small enough that one shaped cutter, dedicated to a specific job of "Grease Nipple Cutter" could be made, insuring consistency. Putting a small ceramic disc in your lathe and using that to cut a contour in a High Speed Steel cutter, placed in the tool holder of the lathe?

    Then of course using that "New" contoured cutter to create that profile in a series of grease fittings.

    (You know all this I'm sure, -but for those who don't do this kind of work? -how small are these things anyway?)

    How is Spring in Switzerland? We're having Summer-like weather here. 80 degrees F.
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #616

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