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    1. Kit: , by (Yearly Subscriber) Roger Zimmermann is offline
      Builder Last Online: Nov 2020 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/12 Rating:  (3 votes - 5.00 average) Thanks: 5
      Started: 07-26-19 Build Revisions: Never  
      Supported Scratch Built

      Before the Mark II was finished, I was thinking that I need some rest and maybe stopping modeling completely.
      After a few months "without", I noticed that I'm missing something. But, what to do? A new 10-years project is out of question, I need something less complex.
      After a while, it was clear that I had to do something with Cadillac. But what? The answer came rather quickly: a 1930 to 1933 Cadillac V-16 engine and frame, as a rolling frame.
      I have some contacts with people restoring the second version: 1932/33 which differs framewise from the first version 1930/31.
      I will have to do new things, like wire wheels! I searched in this forum for a tutorial, but found nothing. However , I do remember that somebody did recently (1 to 2 years) wire wheels. Can somebody tell me where to search?


      1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
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  1. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    Quote Originally Posted by MODEL A MODEL View Post
    Diamond wheel ?
    For the slots? No, steel cutting tool; thickness 0.2mm (0.008"). Diamond wheels are too thick for that, about 0.5mm


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #452

  2. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    I thought so, but you might have access to "Super Tools!"
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #453

  3. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Don, they are commonly available here as jeweler tools.


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #454

  4. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Pretty common here too. Diameter must be smallish?
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #455

  5. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Yes, 4 mm. Sometimes I'm wishing that the diameter would be larger, but at this thickness, it would be very breakable.


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #456

  6. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    After adding all the tiny details to the oil pan, it's now ready. Well, not exactly: I now have to drill all the needed holes to attach it to the crankcase; there are more than 30. Then, I can do the same at the crankcase. The original studs are 3/8", at 1:12, they will be 0.8mm.

    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine-232-oil-pan-ready-jpg


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #457

  7. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Beautiful! Very nice!
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #458

  8. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    At first, I had not idea how to drill the numerous holes at the pan and into the crankcase. The easy method with a rule and tracing point is hardly applicable when so many holes must be drilled with a relative precision.
    For the oil pan, I put it on a wood block, attached it with 4 screws, inserted the whole into a jaw. After checking that the pan was parallel to the bank, I could move the carriage the desired distance and do the holes.

    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine-233-oil-pan-drilling-jpg

    The oil pan was then used as a template to replicate the holes into the block. To avoid unwanted rotational movement, I had to adapt a plate at the front. This way, the assembly was stabilized.

    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine-234-crankcase-drilling-jpg

    Now, all the holes are ready to accept the studs; for the moment, I'm using regular screws to attach the pan to the crankcase. On the original engine, studs were used almost everywhere because aluminum is not strong enough for regular screws (ask the Cadillac designers why they did not used that method on the Northstar engine and previous aluminum ones...)
    As you can see, the flange for the transmission has been trimmed; it's ready to be soldered to the transmission once it's done.

    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine-235-oil-pan-crankcase-jpg1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine-236-oil-pan-crankcase-jpg

    Now, I will do the engine blocks. Fortunately, they are the same left and right; it will be serie work!


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #459

  9. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Very nice!

    An unexpected effect of our forum is to start at the bottom of your posting, showing the finished work first, then scrolling up to your drilling. Unexpected is the reaction it generates! -seeing the "finished" crank-case, I (we), form an opinion of it's relative size, and then to see it on you itsy bitsy Unimat, and it looks enormous!

    I know how large / small the Unimat is, but it looks like some freakishly large machine when you set your engine on it! The cross-slide is only 75mm across?
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #460

  10. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    That's right, that engine is enormous! Wait till the blocks, heads and valve covers are on! Compare the other engine I did, this one is really impressive.
    The cross-slide is in fact 90 mm. I suppose you know that it's the Unimat SL which I'm still using for drilling.


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #461

  11. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Even if the engine blocks are rather easy to do, I spent more time as anticipated. Sometimes things are not going the way I like!
    By the way, when I'm hearing the name "engine block", I do see in my head something rather bulky and heavy. This is not the case with the V-12 and V-16 from that time. I'm first adding pictures from the real thing. The block is indeed the element into the pistons are moving. If you look at the second picture, you see that the cylinders are like a tube protruding from the block. Probably that strange solution was adequate for the low output and RPMs from that time; for me it has an evident lack of rigidity. After all, those engine were more intended for comfort than for power .

    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine-cylinder-block-fit-1-jpg1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine-img_1053-jpg

    The last picture is from my blocks, way from finished.

    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine-237-egine-blocks-jpg


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #462

  12. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Are the cylinder blocks Aluminum with Steel liners? -or are they Steel?
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #463

  13. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    They are cast iron, like the heads. As there is no liquid passages between the crankcase and engine block, the dilatation issue could be neglected.


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #464

  14. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Engine must have run pretty hot 1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine ?

    What did the radiator cool?
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #465

  15. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Water circulated into the heads and block. The capacity was 7 gallons. Oil was/is also a cooling factor: there were 10 quarts oil in the crankcase.


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #466

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