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    1. Kit: , by (Yearly Subscriber) Roger Zimmermann is offline
      Builder Last Online: Oct 2020 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/12 Rating:  (3 votes - 5.00 average) Thanks: 4
      Started: 07-26-19 Build Revisions: Never  
      Supported Scratch Built

      Before the Mark II was finished, I was thinking that I need some rest and maybe stopping modeling completely.
      After a few months "without", I noticed that I'm missing something. But, what to do? A new 10-years project is out of question, I need something less complex.
      After a while, it was clear that I had to do something with Cadillac. But what? The answer came rather quickly: a 1930 to 1933 Cadillac V-16 engine and frame, as a rolling frame.
      I have some contacts with people restoring the second version: 1932/33 which differs framewise from the first version 1930/31.
      I will have to do new things, like wire wheels! I searched in this forum for a tutorial, but found nothing. However , I do remember that somebody did recently (1 to 2 years) wire wheels. Can somebody tell me where to search?


      1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
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  1. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    Thanks Don! It seems that you have a good memory for the rather complicated parts I did in the past!
    As Gerald Wingrove wrote, each complicated part has to be reduced into simple elements. It's what I'm doing. Of course, those engine sides are not just flat, some "decor" will come on them, some functional like the studs to attach the engine blocks to the crankcase.


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #407

  2. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    To continue the crankcase, I began to delimitate the place for the engine blocks. The RH one has an offset equal to the width of a connecting rod's journal, 2.4mm on the model (0.095"). Then, I did the narrow wall ending the crankcase at the engine blocks. I still have to do the same at the rear.
    Then I soldered the rear part of the distribution case but larger than the final shape. Then came the big question: how to proceed further? The most reasonable solution was the shape the flange on which the end cover will be attached. One small flange was soldered at the LH crankcase and holes drilled to attach the end cover.
    Once the flange was shaped correctly, I did the band closing the distribution case. That band was soldered to the mounting flange, letting a small raised edge like you can see on the original picture.
    The question of the day was: can I solder the outer distribution case to the crankcase and have a correct position for the end cover? With careful adjustment and some trick, my gamble went quite well: the end cover is installed at the right position. My description of the various steps can be confusing; this was indeed a complex undertaken.
    There are still missing details on that distribution case; I will probably add them with soft solder.

    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine-206-crankcase-jpg1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine-205-crankcase-jpg1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine-207-crankcase-jpg1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine-208-crankcase-jpg


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #408

  3. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    On top of the distribution case, there is an integrated casting 1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine for the distributor and to attach the cooling fan. I decided to make that piece from a brass block with milling/filing. Once the part was ready, I began to mill/file an aperture at the distribution case which was not an so easy task.
    When the fitting of the past pleased me, it was silver soldered to the assembly.
    On one picture, there is a hole at the back of the distribution case; this is the pilot hole for the generator. I did also the hollow at the crankcase for the generator clearance.
    Just for the fun, I did the last picture with the fan installed; when the engine blocks, cylinder heads and valve covers will be installed, the top of those elements will be a tad under the top of the fan. Imagine that in a modern styling, the hood could not be installed!

    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine-209-rework-jpg1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine-210-distributor-mount-jpg1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine-211-tall-engine-jpg


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #409

  4. markus68's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    This is really inspiring, thank you, Roger.
    QUOTE QUOTE #410

  5. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Again you prove how valuable this forum is!

    Documenting step by step, the incremental steps made, and then pausing to assess your progress!

    Your thread representing the "Old School" and Nick's the "New".

    Thank you for sharing!
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #411

  6. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Thanks Markus and Don! Sure, my "method" is really old school; at the end, it must please the one who is building and have a decent result.

    The last days I prepared and added the ridges on the side of the crankcase. Of course, my crankcase is not looking exactly the same as the original one, but the ridges will have the studs to attach the engine blocks.
    I added also the flanges for the fuel pump and the breather; there are some small details on the block; they will be added later as I intend to soft solder them.
    Thanks to Johan (a member from the Cadillac club) from the Netherland: he sent me a load of pictures from the block without accessories as well as from the transmission and other elements. I'm especially grateful for his pictures from the block; I'm now in a position to continue with the back.

    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine-212-details-jpg1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine-213-details-jpg


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #412

  7. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    don
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    Roger,

    I don't know if you realize the scrutiny your work receives? -I zoom in and look at every join and seam of your work! -To "Hard Solder" so many small pieces on a relatively small "Box" without having previous work fall off?

    You must work very hot 1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine and pretty fast! -with great focus on what your doing!

    I assume that you use safety goggles of course, and gloves. I only mention this now because it is something that none of us have ever talked about. And for those who haven't ever tried to do this kind of work, they should understand that it is not like "Soft Soldering" , which has it's own techniques, but is a relatively intuitive process. Holding an iron like a pencil. Safety is something we all have to keep in mind when we work. Too many modelers work with a cluttered desk and that could be a fire hazard for those of us who use torches!

    I know you are a meticulous worker. Who knows what he is doing. Doing the precise work that you do, while gloved and wearing goggles or a tinted face shield just adds to the accomplishment.

    So? Do you use lots of little clamps? I see that the bosses have tabs? did they just slide into grooves? You really must do a lot of filing to each part to fit them so well!
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #413

  8. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Well, Don, this is more or less a gamble each time I'm silver soldering elements on an assembly which has already other parts silver soldered. You have to know also that the temperature needed for a new joint is lower than to have an old joint liquid again. This characteristic is helping a lot. Of course, the difference is probably not that large, but sufficient to don't have a catastrophe each time new elements are added. In this case, the crankcase is large enough to solder new items without disturbing older ones due to the heat dissipation. With my torch, it takes some time to get the temperature letting flow the soldering. Oxy-acetylene would be quicker but I cannot do have that equipment into a flat.
    My desk is indeed cluttered with the shop manuals and papers. It seems that I'm careful enough not to have the house in flames! Gloves and goggles? No, certainly not! I just know that to manipulate parts in "treatment", I need pliers!
    You have good eyes. The little slots at the top of the crankcase were used to have a regular spacing between each ridge. Brass on brass is very slippering and clamps get destroyed with intense heat. Therefore, the parts are either temporarily attached with a crew (like the flanges for the fuel pump and breather) or slots. The ridges (done from a rod) were first milled to have that narrow tang at the top and then reduced with a file to have the proper profile. This is why the update came so late, it was indeed some work to do that.


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #414

  9. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Thank you Roger for the explanation., I really enjoy looking over your shoulder! -No eye protection?
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #415

  10. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Yes and no: I just have my glasses.


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #416

  11. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Thanks to the new pictures I have, the planning for the rear of the crankcase went without too much difficulties. If I had them at the begin of the crankcase's construction, I could have bent the sides at the rear to form the engine supports. Therefore, I had to cut the excess material at the rear and add "ears". Then I add the wall (which may not be the appropriate word for that) at the end of the engine blocks.
    The flywheel housing was done with a flat piece of brass shaped to the proper diameter and silver soldered to the end flange. I was ready to drill the holes to attach the transmission; fortunately, I realized that I could not drill the hole at the transmission's flange with enough precision with the flywheel housing attached to the crankcase.
    The flange for the transmission is rather thick; of course, I had not the proper material available, therefore I silver soldered 2 pieces of .8mm together, getting this way the proper thickness. The flange at the transmission is not circular; the indentations will be done later, as well as the shape allowing the starter motor to be attached.
    I pre-drilled the holes to both elements; the right diameter's holes can be done later.
    The next job was to adapt the flywheel housing to the existing construction, taking care to be square; finally that sub-assembly was silver soldered to the crankcase. Some excess soldering is still not removed; this will be done later.
    Many elements must be added: the engine supports, the flange for the vacuum pump and so on. Some will be silver soldered; then, as the heat needed to get the proper temperature for each soldering task is getting indecent, remaining small details will be soft soldered.

    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine-214-flywheel-housing-jpg1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine-215-soldered-housing-jpg


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #417

  12. MODEL A MODEL's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Looks like a small cathedral!
    -craftsmanship is a lifelong project of
    self-construction and self determination
    QUOTE QUOTE #418

  13. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Maybe was it the goal from the designers?


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #419

  14. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    The flywheel housing is flat at the top to allow the support for some features to be attached. To have a precise dimension and to be parallel with the bottom, I milled that surface.

    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine-216-milling-flywheel-housing-jpg

    I added then various flanges: the one for the water pump, on the RH side of the engine and the one for a small cover. The mechanic, during maintenance, could rotate that cover to check the timing point.
    Two ridges were also added; they house the guiding bar to assemble the transmission to the engine.

    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine-217-details-added-jpg1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine-218-details-added-jpg

    The next elements added to the crankcase will be soft soldered.

    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine-helping-dog-jpg

    The last picture is showing a great help: since one year we have a "new" dog; he comes sometimes to me to help, or at least its his thinking.


    1:12 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine
    QUOTE QUOTE #420

  15. gbritnell's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Still following along. Truly outstanding work as usual!
    QUOTE QUOTE #421

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