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    1. Kit: , by (Yearly Subscriber) Roger Zimmermann is offline
      Builder Last Online: Oct 2019 Show Printable Version Email this Page
      Model Scale: 1/12 Rating:  Thanks: 1
      Started: 06-10-19 Build Revisions: Never  
      Supported Scratch Built Completed

      Since a boy, I was always fascinated by cars. There were some cars in the small village at the countryside where I grow up, especially VWs (I will never understand why this ugly thing, noisy, unpractical was sold in such quantities). I believe that one of both grocers from the village had a early fifties green 2-door Chevrolet; this was probably the king of the village!

      Ironically, my parents had no car et never had one. If by chance a Studebaker was parked at one of both cafés from that 300 inhabitant's village, I could stay hour(s) to look at it. The 1950 model was the one which started it all.

      We are going forwards for some years: in 1963, the Studebaker Avanti was shown at the Geneva Show; I'm sure that I was a nuisance for the stand's personal as I could not away from this stand!

      I will not relate here all my attempts to recreate cars during my youth using cardboard and a frame done with the Meccano kit. The last vehicle done with this hybrid material was a 1963 Chrysler. I did for this model an innovation: by wetting the cardboard, it could be better shaped in both directions at once.



      After the Geneva show adventure, I had to replicate this Avanti. At that time, I was 18 years old; my father, a wood worker, had not the right tools for my needs. Anyway, I began to do a frame using as a guide the image from the sales catalog I reluctantly got in Geneva. My father had some galvanized sheetmetal; I used that for that frame.
      Why did I choose the scale 1:12? Probably because the available skinny Meccano wheels were suitable for that scale. The construction went muck quicker than what I did in the recent years; there were less details and the resemblance was...marginal at best!



      I was proud from my front suspension and steering system miles away from the reality:



      The main idea was to do again a body using my "new" technique with wet cardboard. However, one of my colleague at the apprenticeship told me that I would get much better results using polyester and fiberglass (he was living in a town and me in the countryside, what a difference!). It was totally new for me and I had to do my experiences with that product. A small story about it I still remember: the instructions stated that it was important to have about 25°C to allow the polyester to set. I waited that my parents went away a Sunday afternoon to heat like hell the furnace in the living room using wood to get the desired temperature, even more, for my first experience. As it was probably autumn or winter, all windows were closed. I still hear the exclamations from my parents about the heat and the bad smelling when they came back!
      I learned quickly enough that a positive mold was necessary as first. Then, as a second step, a negative form should be done using the positive mold. Finally, the negative mold is to be used to get the final part. How easy it was with cardboard: not overheating needed, no bad smell and quickly done!
      How could I do the positive mold? I choose probably by accident the plaster. Not the one used by the sculptors but the cheap one to do walls and ceilings!
      It's easy to work with once it's dry (sometimes too easy) and it's doing a lot of dust. This later aspect was not important, the shop from my father was full of wood dust. A little more did not matter.

      The first result:



      Me at work, probably 1965 or 1966:




      The story about my 1:12 Studebaker Avanti
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  1. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Roger
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    November 11, 2009

    We are continuing with the rim work: I’m now turning the inside diameter. There are bits of brass everywhere !



    The machining of the rim is coming well along. On those parts, angles are never at 90°. The small tool is perfect to machine such surfaces at odd angles. They must be recorded to facilitate the work at the other remaining parts.



    The first rim is completed ; the weight is just 21 grams. For the 5 rims, I began with a 1 kg tube! Yes, there is a lot of waste.




    The story about my 1:12 Studebaker Avanti
    QUOTE QUOTE #92

  2. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    November 23, 2009

    After almost swimming into metal chips, I finished the 5 rims and began to do the wheel’s centers.



    November 27, 2009

    There is a lot of hand held tool work, especially at the rear of the wheel’s centers. I have to be careful with the fingers and with the tool. There are vibrations and, if the tool is not held correctly, it can get stuck into the part to be machined. The secret with this kind of work is to take away a maximum of metal but leaving enough to have a stabile part.




    The story about my 1:12 Studebaker Avanti
    QUOTE QUOTE #93

  3. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    November 30, 2009
    Not yet finished…and already something to repair?

    The hub from the front brake rotor is 0.1mm too large for the hole at the wheel center. It can happen when there is not enough precision! I had to remove the caliper to modify the rotor.
    For practical reasons, I could not enlarge the wheel’s center hole. Now, I have to do the same at the other side!



    December 01, 2009
    The first wheel is ready. I had to modify the inside diameter because there was an interference with the caliper.
    I just have to finish the 4 other wheels, fabricate the wheelcovers and the tires!




    The story about my 1:12 Studebaker Avanti
    QUOTE QUOTE #94

  4. markus68's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Very interesting to see how you do the wheels. Marklus
    QUOTE QUOTE #95

  5. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Thanks Markus! They are done the easy way, with a lot of wasted brass. And now, I'm doing about the same for the new project!


    The story about my 1:12 Studebaker Avanti
    QUOTE QUOTE #96

  6. markus68's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    I am curious. Markus
    QUOTE QUOTE #97

  7. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    Quote Originally Posted by markus68 View Post
    I am curious. Markus
    It's the 1932 Cadillac V-16 frame and engine. I began a thread on this forum.


    The story about my 1:12 Studebaker Avanti
    QUOTE QUOTE #98

  8. markus68's Avatar VIP/Sponsor
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    Thank you Roger. I have found the thread. Markus
    QUOTE QUOTE #99

  9. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    December 06, 2009

    All five wheels are ready. Two are seen at the back and the other ones at the front.



    The next step: either the wheelcovers or the tires, I don’t know yet!

    Regarding the tires: in contrary of my plan, I will do the tires for the Avanti first (at that time, the Continental Mark II was still in planning). The exterior diameter of the Toronado master tire is almost the same as a tire 6.70 (which is the tire’s dimension for the Avanti) but too small for a 8.20 tire for the Mark II.

    December 07, 2009

    I began today to modify the Toronado master tire.



    Compared to what I must have, it’s too wide and only 1 mm too tall. The white wall was very thin for the Toronado; it will be wider for the Avanti. I regret that the name « Good Year » will be destroyed with the modification. As usual, I don’t remember how I did it, but by looking carefully at the letters, it seems that I painted the surface, scratched the unneeded paint and added some with a brush to have more thickness.


    The story about my 1:12 Studebaker Avanti
    QUOTE QUOTE #100

  10. Roger Zimmermann's Avatar Yearly Subscriber
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    December 09, 2009
    Master tire

    The first operation is to remove the brass bands which are soldered to the main « tire ». I hope to salvage most of them:



    The master tire is coming on the lathe to modify it: a bit less tall and narrower. Most of the work is done with the conventional tools belonging to the machine; the sides are modified with a hand held tool, like you would do with a piece of wood. The difference is that the metal is harder to cut!



    The job is quicker than anticipated; the master is more or less ready: I have to add the bands for the profile and do the name.
    The groove on the side is for the white wall. It will be made with silicone and pushed into the tire.



    To do that groove, I used an improvised tool, very thin (the black arrow is showing it) ; due to its shape, that tool created a lot of vibrations. To maintain the white wall into the tire, the inside diameter of the groove is larger than at the outside.




    The story about my 1:12 Studebaker Avanti
    QUOTE QUOTE #101

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